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Here's a pic of my 1924b trigger guard and floor plate if it helps:
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
This picture is of an intermediate action. The Gew 98 which is a standard or long action has the locking or "capture" screws on the opposite side of the trigger guard screws.
I am getting more confused than when I started this thread. ;)

1) Is the conclusion that the stock is NOT correct for this rifle?

2) If stock is not correct, what rifle is it thought to be from?

3) What trigger guard do I need? GEW fits except for the capture screw extension at the front.
 

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I am getting more confused than when I started this thread. ;)

1) Is the conclusion that the stock is NOT correct for this rifle?

2) If stock is not correct, what rifle is it thought to be from?

3) What trigger guard do I need? GEW fits except for the capture screw extension at the front.
1) Stock is not correct

2) Probably for a Yugo Model 1924

3) Your trigger guard is the correct type, standard length, what you need is a stock for a standard length receiver.
From what others have stated ( I am not that familiar with the model 1924B) the original stock for your rifle would have been a modified
German Gew. 98 stock. Others that should fit, Yugo Model 1930 stock, German K98k stock, Czech VZ-24 stock, and any other made for a standard
length large ring receiver. If you decided to go with a Yugo Model 1930 stock, I think they are still available from Springfield Sporters or other
surplus dealers.
hope this helps, runner
 

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The K98k stock might fit, but would present an issue with the handguard/rear sight arrangement. A VZ24 might work good if you use the VZ handguard and bands. The Gew 98 and other long, std. action stocks would have to be cut down and modified to fit.
 

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This picture is of an intermediate action. The Gew 98 which is a standard or long action has the locking or "capture" screws on the opposite side of the trigger guard screws.
I used to think this also, until someone on this forum corrected me. Check your 1930 Venzualian FN Mauser, lock screw behind and standard bolt will go and lock. It seems to be something FN did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I used to think this also, until someone on this forum corrected me. Check your 1930 Venzualian FN Mauser, lock screw behind and standard bolt will go and lock. It seems to be something FN did.

I thought I had seen this arrangement before. Sold a sporterized Venezualan last year, which is likely where I saw it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
1) Stock is not correct

2) Probably for a Yugo Model 1924

3) Your trigger guard is the correct type, standard length, what you need is a stock for a standard length receiver.
From what others have stated ( I am not that familiar with the model 1924B) the original stock for your rifle would have been a modified
German Gew. 98 stock. Others that should fit, Yugo Model 1930 stock, German K98k stock, Czech VZ-24 stock, and any other made for a standard
length large ring receiver. If you decided to go with a Yugo Model 1930 stock, I think they are still available from Springfield Sporters or other
surplus dealers.
hope this helps, runner
It does help, thank you.

I have a VZ24 stock on hand. The upper/front wood piece fits, but the band location is different than the existing stock.

Help me understand the difference, briefly, between this Model 1924B and the "Yugo Model 1924" if you don't mind.

Does this stock have any value? It is the work of minutes to inlet the GEW metal and complete this rifle with the components I have on hand. (I am not a collector). I will not sporterize this action, as it clearly has collectable status. I do not have much interest in spending the time/money putting it back to original.

If the stock has value, I'll sell them separately instead of altering it.
 

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There has been a fair amount of misinformation about trigger guards presented so far in this thread.

The FN1924 TG length is approx. 8 3/8 inches. The action screws are closer together than on a G98.

The FN1930 TG length is approx. 8 7/16 inches. The action screws are the same spacing as on a G98. The lock screw is to the rear of the front action screw.

The G98 TG length is approx. 8 9/16 inches. The extra length is forward of the front action screw. The lock screw is forward of the front action screw.

If I had the subject rifle I would want to restore it because of the matching bolt. The current stock is FN and is unsuitable. I would buy a M1908 stock and handguard, those being readily available, and I would buy a G98 trigger guard, floorplate, follower, and magazine spring.

The M1908 stock would need to be shortened to match your barrel. The easy way to measure would be to put a bayonet on the bayonet lug (removed from the stock). Put the bayonet next to the barrel in the correct position and the bayonet lug will show where to cut the stock.

Looking at the photo of the band springs in post 11, it seems the rear band will need to be moved rearward in order to get enough spacing between the two springs. The location of the front spring is determined by the location of the front band and the location of the front band is determined by the location of the bayonet lug. The bayonet lug was located by the position of the bayonet next to the barrel.

The rear spring is located rear of the front spring to match the photo in post 11. The only hard part will be the inletting for the two band springs. Both the stock and the handguard will need to be modified for the new rearward location of the rear band.

It seems to me to be a worthy project. The M1908 stock will lack the bolt disassembly disks of the G98, but early G98 stocks did not have those disks anyway.

The Yugo M24 is the same as an FN1924. Both have an intermediate length action, shorter than the standard length G98/FN1930/K98k/VZ24. The first M24 rifles were made for Yugoslavia by FN; later ones were made by the Yugos. Later still they were rebuilt and remarked as M24/47. The same design with a bent bolt and K98k style stock became the Yugo M48.

The M1924b was the G98 and M1912 rifles rebuilt by the Yugos to resemble the M24. M1912 rifles were being made by Steyr in 1914 for Mexico, Colombia, and Chile. Those remaining at Steyr when WWI started were taken for use by the Austria-Hungarian Army. Some remained in Yugoslavia after WWI. If I remember correctly, those M1912 changed from 7mm to 7.92mm were called M1914.

Your stock has some value as a FN1930 stock so long as you do not cut out wood in front of the trigger guard to make a G98 trigger guard fit.

Regards,
Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
If I had the subject rifle I would want to restore it because of the matching bolt. The current stock is FN and is unsuitable. I would buy a M1908 stock and handguard, those being readily available, and I would buy a G98 trigger guard, floorplate, follower, and magazine spring.

I have finished assembly of the bolt with the correct era parts and have the trigger guard. Have not yet checked my parts stash for the correct follower, spring a floorplate, but the future owner will have less work to do.

It seems to me to be a worthy project. The M1908 stock will lack the bolt disassembly disks of the G98, but early G98 stocks did not have those disks anyway.

It does sound like a worthy project. For the right person. That would not be me. That is why I ask these type of questions. I have a drawer full of Mauser actions. So, no pressing need to take this one apart.


The M1924b was the G98 and M1912 rifles rebuilt by the Yugos to resemble the M24.

Thanks. That is how I was thinking, but your clarification is what I was looking for.

Your stock has some value as a FN1930 stock so long as you do not cut out wood in front of the trigger guard to make a G98 trigger guard fit.

That was why I asked. I knew if it had any value, it would go away with the inletting.


Regards,
Bill

Thanks for clearing up some questions and giving me the information I needed to make an informed decision.
 

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It is an often repeated myth that you can differentiate between the Model 1924 and Model 1930 by the placement of the lock screws. The Model 1930 was made with the lock screw both to the rear and in front of the front guard screw. I have two model 1930s with the lock screw in front of the front guard screw: one a prewar chinese export with the large FN crest, the other probably postwar, made for the IDF. I also have 1930 models with the lock screw behind the front guard screw; one with large FN crest over the date 1938 (another Chinese export) a model 1930 Greek and a Model 1930 Columbian, these three have the lock screw behind the front guard screw. All five rifles are standard length actions.

Also the OP existing stock is not a FN model 1930, if it was it would be a standard length action and his Gew. 98 trigger guard would fit. He has a FN or Yugo stock for a model 1924 which is the intermediate length, that is why his Gew. 98 trigger guard does not fit. IF he had a model 1930 stock he would be good to go.
 

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It is an often repeated myth that you can differentiate between the Model 1924 and Model 1930 by the placement of the lock screws. The Model 1930 was made with the lock screw both to the rear and in front of the front guard screw. I have two model 1930s with the lock screw in front of the front guard screw: one a prewar chinese export with the large FN crest, the other probably postwar, made for the IDF. I also have 1930 models with the lock screw behind the front guard screw; one with large FN crest over the date 1938 (another Chinese export) a model 1930 Greek and a Model 1930 Columbian, these three have the lock screw behind the front guard screw. All five rifles are standard length actions.

Also the OP existing stock is not a FN model 1930, if it was it would be a standard length action and his Gew. 98 trigger guard would fit. He has a FN or Yugo stock for a model 1924 which is the intermediate length, that is why his Gew. 98 trigger guard does not fit. IF he had a model 1930 stock he would be good to go.
You miss the point that the FN1930 and G98 trigger guards have a different overall length (see post 28). The stock is for a FN1930, or more likely with that buttplate, an FN1950.

Your Chinese FN1930 probably has a Chinese or other non-FN trigger guard. The original would have been shorter overall and with the front lock screw to the rear of the front action screw. The FN1950 rifles made for Israel were an exception. They had a K98k (G98) type trigger guard and were also put in a semi-clone K98k stock.

Regards,
Bill
 

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Geladen, Thanks for sorting this mess out!
 

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Geladen, Thanks for sorting this mess out!
Hi Jim,

I could only do it because I first had to sort out my own rifles, some of which had mixed parts when I got them.

Regards,
Bill
 

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Geladen, I respect your opinion, and I am not trying to be agruementative, I have rechecked my rifles. The FN with the standard length trigger guard is the same length as a Gew. 98 trigger guard. As you know FN did not number the trigger guards or floor plates on the model 1930, so I can't say for certain if the trigger guard is the one it left the factory with. It has no chinese marks, but no FN marks either. (my other model 1930 trigger guards that have the guard screw inside the action screw are unmarked as well. I think part of the confusion is with the nomenclature , FN model 1950. I don't think FN ever made a rifle they classified as a model 1950. My belief is that is a collector term for post war rifles that are double broach cut. In my mind the IDF rifle is just a late production model 1930.

having said all that, you are obviously more familiar with the model 1924B than I am. I just purchased the collectors book on Serbian and Yugo Mausers, I guess I better start reading it. Anyway this has been an informative and enjoyable thread, and we all agree the rifle is worth saving.

regards, frank aka runner

You miss the point that the FN1930 and G98 trigger guards have a different overall length (see post 28). The stock is for a FN1930, or more likely with that buttplate, an FN1950.

Your Chinese FN1930 probably has a Chinese or other non-FN trigger guard. The original would have been shorter overall and with the front lock screw to the rear of the front action screw. The FN1950 rifles made for Israel were an exception. They had a K98k (G98) type trigger guard and were also put in a semi-clone K98k stock.

Regards,
Bill
 

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Geladen, I respect your opinion, and I am not trying to be agruementative, I have rechecked my rifles. The FN with the standard length trigger guard is the same length as a Gew. 98 trigger guard. As you know FN did not number the trigger guards or floor plates on the model 1930, so I can't say for certain if the trigger guard is the one it left the factory with. It has no chinese marks, but no FN marks either. (my other model 1930 trigger guards that have the guard screw inside the action screw are unmarked as well. I think part of the confusion is with the nomenclature , FN model 1950. I don't think FN ever made a rifle they classified as a model 1950. My belief is that is a collector term for post war rifles that are double broach cut. In my mind the IDF rifle is just a late production model 1930.

having said all that, you are obviously more familiar with the model 1924B than I am. I just purchased the collectors book on Serbian and Yugo Mausers, I guess I better start reading it. Anyway this has been an informative and enjoyable thread, and we all agree the rifle is worth saving.

regards, frank aka runner
Hi Frank,

You are of course correct that FN1950 is only a collector term for FN rifles that are double broach cut. It also is a general term for post war FN rifles. What we call a FN1950 carbine was known by FN as a M1935 Gendarmerie carbine.

So far as I know - and I can always be corrected - only the Israeli FN1950 was made with a trigger guard of G98/K98k length.

Regards,
Bill
 

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Anyway this has been an informative and enjoyable thread
As they all should be. And, what makes this venue a joy to visit. Just shows to go ya. "Discussion is an exchange of knowledge. An argument an exchange of ignorance" Can't beat a free education.
 

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Do you have a picture of the bottom metal/trigger guard? Does it have lock screws?

I have tried a half a dozen different ones. (Even a couple from post war FN sporting rifles) The one shown fits the best, except the front is too long as pictured.

It is a standard length action. I put 3-4 different bolts in it. All closed including one from a Interarms Mark X.

Action does fit the stock, which does not appear to have been altered.
Looks like its been sorted out but for what its worth here is the pic.

Tool
Shotgun Wood
 

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Bill/Frank thanks for modeling so well how to exchange knowledge in a civilized and respectful manner. Your exchanges are very educational and interesting to us neophytes - but more importantly you are class acts.
 

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Bill/Frank thanks for modeling so well how to exchange knowledge in a civilized and respectful manner. Your exchanges are very educational and interesting to us neophytes - but more importantly you are class acts.
As Billy Meier said, "Thanks for the flowers". I learned a lot of what I know about Mausers from John Wall - who really is the class act to emulate.

If you want to see the opposite, take a look at the Japanese forum.

Regards,
Bill
 
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