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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Purchased from an online auction that had it described as a "VZ-24".

I understand the history from doing some searches here and elsewhere. What seems to be odd, it that this rifle seems to be missing markings compared to what I found online.

No evidence of it being scrubbed. It was missing the bottom metal, shroud and firing pin assembly. I bought it with the plan to sporterize, but always try to research before I take a rifle into pieces.

From these pictures, what of the history can you tell me?

Thank you!













 

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The M1924B rifles were made from leftover/captured German parts... yours has German proofs on all the parts. If you have the complete gun, I wouldn't sporterize this one. There are many other less interesting rifles to chop, or find a chopped one.
+1

I like it.. a sportized mauser can be found all day long.. this one you pictured - not so much. That looks like a nice action and unique.
 

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That's not a 'regular' Model 1924 Yugoslav Mauser, but a Model 1924b. The latter are significantly harder to locate, especially in anything but worn, beat condition. This is summarizing things quite a bit, but they were made from German Gewehr 98 parts, and then brought up to Model 1924 specs. That's why so many of your small parts bear Imperial German stamps, numbers and frakturs.

These aren't usually found with matching bolts, so yours is definitely a plus. Where's the rest of the rifle?
Congrats,
Pat
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
These aren't usually found with matching bolts, so yours is definitely a plus. Where's the rest of the rifle?
Congrats,
Pat
No idea about the parts that are missing. Came from an estate. I have the stock, and one band.

I have some GEW pieces including bottom metal.
 

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A pic of the stock would confirm if it's correct or not. The other pieces needed can of course be sourced from G.98 parts, as you noted.
Pat
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The M1924B rifles were made from leftover/captured German parts... yours has German proofs on all the parts. If you have the complete gun, I wouldn't sporterize this one. There are many other less interesting rifles to chop, or find a chopped one.
Yep, this is why I always look into rifles and actions that I don't know about.

I have a dozen actions ahead of this one, so it will be set aside or parts found to put it back together. I have recently acquired a stash of Mauser parts, so I'll see if I can match the serial number on some of the parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
More pics.

Bottom metal doesn't fit the inletting? This is a magazine box with "Imperial" proofs, I think. I'll take a closer look tomorrow. Have another auction to attend tonight.




 

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That's definitely not the stock that the Yugoslavs put it into. It should have a cut-down Gewehr 98 stock, and should have the bolt take down ferrules and Imperial proofs, among other aspects.
Pat
 

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"Bottom metal", magazine trigger guard actually, is from a standard length action. I am not familar with the 1934B but it must have had a medium length like the FN 1924's? From looks of butt plate, stock came off a FN rifle of the post war period. I doubt you will find a TG with German proofs in a med. action, may be wrong on that.
Does the reciever fit in the wood? Does TG fit the reciever?
 

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Here is my matching 1924b

As others have said its a rare treat to find a matching bolt on one of these

 

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Correct me if I'm wrong but if the 24Bs were made from left over Gew 98 parts, they would be long actions wouldn't
they? Gew 98 parts should be fairly easy to find, I'm not sure about the stock. This stock looks Columbian (buttplate). One thing for sure, I would definitely NOT sporterize this one.
 

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The stock is from a FN, but is for a model 1924 which had a intermediate length receiver. FN also made the model 1930 which is a standard length receiver, your rifle should drop right into one of those and would be "correct" as a Yugo rework. I think FN made both a model 1924 and a model 1930 that used the waffle buttplate.

That's definitely not the stock that the Yugoslavs put it into. It should have a cut-down Gewehr 98 stock, and should have the bolt take down ferrules and Imperial proofs, among other aspects.
Pat
 

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How would it be 'correct as a Yugo rework' if dropped into a FN stock? The Model 1924b series never used anything but Gewehr 98/Mexican Model 1912 and domestically produced Yugoslav components.
 

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How would it be 'correct as a Yugo rework' if dropped into a FN stock? The Model 1924b series never used anything but Gewehr 98/Mexican Model 1912 and domestically produced Yugoslav components.
you are right. I was thinking of a FN made model 1930 receiver, when this is a recycled German receiver. The model 1930 stock should fit, and as these rifles were made/modified by the Yugo's to mimic the FN, the look would be appropriate, but as you point out not technically correct.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Here is my matching 1924b

As others have said its a rare treat to find a matching bolt on one of these
Do you have a picture of the bottom metal/trigger guard? Does it have lock screws?

I have tried a half a dozen different ones. (Even a couple from post war FN sporting rifles) The one shown fits the best, except the front is too long as pictured.

It is a standard length action. I put 3-4 different bolts in it. All closed including one from a Interarms Mark X.

Action does fit the stock, which does not appear to have been altered.
 

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Do you have a picture of the bottom metal/trigger guard? Does it have lock screws?

I have tried a half a dozen different ones. (Even a couple from post war FN sporting rifles) The one shown fits the best, except the front is too long as pictured.

It is a standard length action. I put 3-4 different bolts in it. All closed including one from a Interarms Mark X.

Action does fit the stock, which does not appear to have been altered.
The trigger guard on a Model 1924 measures approx 8 1/4 inches. On a Model 1930 approx 8 1/2 inches. Measure the opening on your stock, if it measures less than 8 1/2 inches it is a model 1924 stock and your Imperial German trigger guard, which is standard length, will not fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Rifle is locked up for the evening, but from Google, it would appear that I need a trigger guard with the lock screw behind front screw like this one.
Bummer. I have many actions and trigger guards, but none with this arrangement. I did go through my parts and come up with a shroud and safety lever with Imperial stamps.

 

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Rifle is locked up for the evening, but from Google, it would appear that I need a trigger guard with the lock screw behind front screw like this one.
Bummer. I have many actions and trigger guards, but none with this arrangement. I did go through my parts and come up with a shroud and safety lever with Imperial stamps.

View attachment 772774
This picture is of an intermediate action. The Gew 98 which is a standard or long action has the locking or "capture" screws on the opposite side of the trigger guard screws.
 
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