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I bought my first gun and first mosin not to long ago. After making an account on a dedicated mosin forum I had asked a few questions which were answer swiftly and with a great answer. However they seem to be very against modifying any mosin in any way. So I come to this forum to ask your opinion mostly on stock refinishing. My mosin is a typical refurb with a rather ugly finish. I had considered refinishing the stock to make its overall appearance better and more pleasing to look at. What are your guys thoughts?
 

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Not many purists here. It's your rifle - do as you wish. And provide before and after pictures, please.
 

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One trick that the Finns used was a layer of either brass or steel shims directly under the receiver ring on the moisin nagant. If one of your rifles has these shims don't throw them away. They were part of someone's accurizing program. I have a 1935 Finn M27 with these shims. The rifle shoots cast bullets extremely well. Frank
 

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MoistNug if you are who I think you are......you are now in the right forum for the questions you are asking. Ask a little more direct on your questions though. This is the place for it. Even though you know I am pretty much a purist myself when it comes to Mosins, these guys are good very knowledgable people here. If nothing else, I hope I could help you find the right people to help you with the right way to do what you want to do with your rifle..........OK purist coming out in me, just don't modify anything that is rare and really collectible. Sorry couldn't help myself.....
 

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ok , typically things go up in value over time. based on rarity...the up swing can jump....look at swiss k31 from 100 to 350 plus in 5-6 yrs...the import supply seems to have dried up, so prices will drift up..and they shoot.
look at chinese sks in commercial form...from 100 to 250 in 7-8 yrs......not importable they ,in stock from, are going up. ammo has more than doubled since the chinese ammo ban...so not as much cheap blasting as in the past.

now mn's....rumor iss there are between 17,000,000 and 22,000,000 out there. price has gone from 59 to 100 dollars in 10 yrs......i still buy right at 100.


so while some time in the very distant future, your rifle maybe worth..200...it aint gonna be soon...so if playing with it gives you some enjoyment....do it!



i'm building a 91/30 pu sniper, and built the 91/12 sniper....i own a 28/30 ,a new unfired polish 44,, a 59, and a couple of 39's..and a stack of 91/30's and a bunch of other milsurplus rifles...some original, some not.

mike in co
 

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There are "collector" guns where the "purist" will get all hot and bothered over a serial number or proof mark, and then there are the millions of guns with no particular historical significance and of little value or interest to a collector. Such a low value and inexpensive military surplus rifle may be a great platform to modify into a "shooter" highly prized by the owner and appreciated for what it is.
DO: Investigate the gun first and make sure it has no collector value or something that sets it apart from the crowd. It is a shame to see a valuable collector piece ruined by Bubba.
DO: Plan out your project and decide what you want to make out of it before getting out the tools. Have a solid game plan for what you want it to become.
DO: Thoroughly test it out and determine if it is good enough to invest a lot of time and money on the project. Many have worn out or shot out bores incapable of ever being improved no matter how hard you try.
DO: Research all the discussions on how to make improvements, what parts to buy, and what has worked best for other people.
DON'T: Assume you can make a silk purse out of a cow's ear by taking any old hunk of junk and dressing it in fine clothing.
DON'T: Think you can make a wonder gun overnight by swapping a few parts or having at it with simple hand tools.

If you are not going to invest the time, effort, research and money to make it better than what it already is, leave it for Bubba and go buy yourself a brand new gun with proven results.
By the time you add up your cost in parts and labor,you may have exceeded the cost of a new gun and still end up with something of little intrinsic value to anyone but you.
 

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Not many purists here. It's your rifle - do as you wish. And provide before and after pictures, please.
^this^ Pictures are always good. Don't ever worry about what others think of your projects. I think you will be surprised how many people at a range will pay you a nice compliment on a good looking rifle or handgun, and if they don't like it, who cares. Every time I have taken "Moberg" out there is always one person who will ask why I ruined a M-44 stock (without knowing the story behind it), I smile and say "because I could". Good luck on your project.
 

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In all honesty, you should follow the above advice. Once you find that you have a run of the mill gun you can do a simple strip and finish on the wood and use whatever you like. Below is a post re. a pine tar finnish that would be neat and not un-correct on a Mosin. You can stain and oil finish or simply wax the gun if you like. Do yourself a favor, avoid urethane finishes as they are a pain in the butt to ever strip and (I feel) mar too easily.

Post before and after pics.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
One trick that the Finns used was a layer of either brass or steel shims directly under the receiver ring on the moisin nagant. If one of your rifles has these shims don't throw them away. They were part of someone's accurizing program. I have a 1935 Finn M27 with these shims. The rifle shoots cast bullets extremely well. Frank
can you point me in the right direction to find pictures and possibly a how to on how to do this to my 91/30. I've heard if shimming mosins but have never really been sure what was meant by that besides a shim on the trigger spring.

Also I've heard of adding epoxy at the rear of the receiver between the stock and receiver. I'm assuming to reduce the movement of the receiver when firing. Can someone also point me in the right direction for a how to so I can do it properly

are there any other modifications I could do to improve accuracy.

For the record my mosin is a typical refurb. No matching numbers and a mix match of izveshk and Tula parts. I had planned on refinishing the stock because the stock right now is rather ugly and boring. It is shiny in some parts and dull in others. It has very nice colors to it so i would love to give it a new an fresh look. I don't want a shiny finish. I want somethin kind of dull. I'm thinking of using a type of oil that doesn't alter the color of the wood but will still protect it. What would you guys recommend?

MoistNug if you are who I think you are......you are now in the right forum for the questions you are asking. Ask a little more direct on your questions though. This is the place for it. Even though you know I am pretty much a purist myself when it comes to Mosins, these guys are good very knowledgable people here. If nothing else, I hope I could help you find the right people to help you with the right way to do what you want to do with your rifle..........OK purist coming out in me, just don't modify anything that is rare and really collectible. Sorry couldn't help myself.....
Oh yes I agree 100%. If it was rare in any way I would leave it as is. But since its just a typical refurb I don't mind making minor modifications to improve accuracy and the overall appearance. Down the line I would like to get a m38 and I will be sure to keep that one exactly as I buy it.
 

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They look much better to me with an oil finish. Nice and dull.
I use Boiled Linseed Oil rubbed in with OO steel wool. Soothes the rough edges/spots without being too smooth.
A little Pine Tar mixed with it darkens the wood some, adds a good smell, and it's almost what the Finns did.

Scraping the shellac off with a utility razor blade removes almost no wood, and gets rid of splinters. (Don't use sandpaper.)

No need for epoxy. Metal shims under the receiver are what the Finns did. (I like to copy them.)
Usually one 0.030" brass shim, just behind the recoil lug is what mine need.

There's lots of information here on all this stuff, use the search function. Or ask for specifics.
Pictures are very important to us, post lots.


Phil
 

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Value is based on demand, or rarity, considering there are more M-Ns' than Doans liver pills? both of these traits are gone. What is slowly driving the prices of M-Ns' up is, the same thing driving the prices up for everything else. I'm not saying there are not collectible M-Ns', but the average person in the market will probably not pay what a true collectible is worth. After all, there are millions of them out there. So if you have a true collectible, I wouldn't mess with it, you will devalue it. If it is one of the millions, it's you rifle, do as you wish. If a purist is upset about it, offer to sell it to him and see what he says. I have tried, they don't buy.
 

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I have an original Sako barreled Finn Model 39 which will never touch. But I picked up a $25.00 prebubbarized Tula MN which was beyond redemption. So put a 29 dollar fully click adjustable ghost ring aperture sight on it, a butt extension, made a lace up leather cheek riser and stained the wood.

Frankly, it is one of my best shooters with cast boolits and is now my dedicated truck gun.

 

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I bought my first gun and first mosin not to long ago. After making an account on a dedicated mosin forum I had asked a few questions which were answer swiftly and with a great answer.
Hey sounds like my story to a tee. I got deleted over there based on what I had in a private message sent to another new mosin owner. So dont feel bad. They loathe people posting pictures of yet another mundane refurb rifle with a crappy shellac job of unknown origin. Then they usually castigate the person for wanting to alter the same precious one-of-a-kind time capsule of the all but forgotten mythical Russian museum piece. It is good to be king, so I dont fault them, but it does get a bit tiresome.

http://www.aimsurplus.com/product.aspx?item=X9130Set

Refurb stocks are 17 bucks each plus shipping when you buy three. If it soothes your soul, buy three poorly finished stocks to replace the one you clean up. :)
 

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Anything you do to move your rifle away from it's original design decreases the collectibility and value for potential resale. If you never plan to sell it (and you never should sell your first rifle!) feel free to do whatever you like. My advice is to buy a replacement stock and modify that while retaining the original in original condition when you change your mind and want it back 5 years from now.
 

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Anything you do to move your rifle away from it's original design decreases the collectibility and value for potential resale. If you never plan to sell it (and you never should sell your first rifle!) feel free to do whatever you like. My advice is to buy a replacement stock and modify that while retaining the original in original condition when you change your mind and want it back 5 years from now.
Well, a tomato stake is a tomato stake...
 

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My opinion is pretty much in line with the "do no harm" ethic, generally, but it's your rifle. If you know, going-in, that the value to a collector will be diminished by refinishing, and you are OK with that, then press on. For those who prize aesthetics over originality, the value may be increased. Certainly, in my earlier days, I did these sort of things starting with barreled receivers, and building them from parts (never with a complete rifle), and found that I could sell them off my back pretty quickly at a gun show. Never once made my money back, though.
 

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If your personal abilities at real gunsmithing are limited like mine, Jim The Bolt Man (a sponsor here.) Does some really fine work. I had him modify an extra Mosin Nagant bolt into the Z shape handle, add a ring cocking knob, and bead blast it. It is really a nice job. Really nice. I highly recommend his work.
 
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