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Is there a standard amount needed to reduce the load when using 30-06 brass to make the cases as opposed to 'real' 9.3x62mm brass, or just load from the same charts (with suitable reduction and work up as with any new load/components)?
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Also, (new to me, but maybe not to those who are more familiar with the round), I saw a chambering reamer offered in this caliber based on the 30-06 case head size. Rechambering or new chamberings with it would set aside any worry of the slightly undersize '06 case head causing a problem I guess. Wouldn't a new set of reloading dies also be in order?
 

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Add the 03 Springfield to the list of twin front lug actions with a third safety lug, just a copy of Mauser design anyway. The Mannlicher military bolt actions including the Schoenauer system all use the bolt handle base/guide rib as a safety lug against the wall of the right side of the receiver. Just as large and heavy or more so than the 3rd lug of the 98. Plenty of designs with a third lug. The bolt shroud design of the 98 has to be considered a definate plus with the deflection flange should a cartridge case let go and the gas make back that far to the shooters face and eyes. Even the 1902 New Model Mannlichers had that. Something the pre 98 Mausers lack, but the thumb cut of the military actions would probably release most of the problem at that point coming along the left side lug raceway. The '03s cone shaped barrel breech doesn't support the cartridge base as well as a Mauser and is a presumed weak spot when it comes to a rupture. When one does happen, all the gas pressure needs to go somewhere and the gas ports no matter what rifle usually point it into the magazine and/or the bolt race ways. The Lee Enfield however uses the gas ports on the left side of the receiver opposite the bolt head. The great advantage of the rimmed cartridge, flat faced bolt and near complete encircled case head makes a very strong breech. The small extractor cut in the barrel has a matching relieved cut in the receiver on the right should a failure occur there. Many Military L/E rifle bolts only engage on one lug, or just barely onto the second. Some setback occurs to correct the situation through use. Headspace expands as a result, but is easiest of the lot to correct with the separate bolt head. L/E are strong, but do have limits. The gas handling abilitys are limited by the very small ports and the action does have it's strength limits too. I've have seen them blown but that prooves nothing. Anything can be destroyed. Ackley did alot of the blow 'em up tests on different military rifles after WW2 and came to the conclusion that the Arisaka was the strongest of the lot. There hasn't been a run on custom built sporting rifles on Arisaka actions just yet but it's an entertaining read.
BTW I do personally rate my Lee Sporting rifles right up there with anything else I own. One is in 400/350 and it handles it just fine.
This has been a great thread with interesting views and information.
 
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