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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Just got mine. 1943 tula, numbers match on barrel, bolt and buttplate, the scope mount has a scratched on matching serial number. The scope is dated 1941 has a refurb mark,and is crystal clear, and in very good shape.

Now here are some interesting observation and questions. The magazine is Izhevsk, the previous number is crossed out and a matching serial number has been added. The bolt handle is bent at an angle, how common is this?

Overall I am happy with my purchase. My only complaints are that the upper handguard is cracked. And that the bore had some rust in it, I cleaned it out, there seems to be no pitting, the rifling is good the crown is great. But still, the presence of some rust in the bore was a tad disappointing.
 

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The scope is dated 1941 has a refurb mark,and is crystal clear, and in very good shape.
Your scope is an SVT style scope.
Is CB marked?

Regards.
 

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The fact that the scope is 1941 dated is very intresting.
There was an intresting discussion on the old.gunboards about 1941 dated PU sniper rifles.

Officialy the Mosin Nagant with PU scope was introduced in 1942.


Surelly your scope is CB marked ( It seems by the pics),and that means that it was calibrated for the Mosin Nagant rifle.(I don't think that an "incorrect" scope was put into storage with some PU Mosin Nagant sniper rifles.)

Really I don't know if the scope was born to be used on the Mosin Nagant in 1941 or if it was converted for that rifle during refurb. process.

This is just my theory.
I would like to know more opinions and advices.


Best regards.
 

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Ohhh!!!!!!!!I arrived too late!!!!!!!!!!

My opinion is totally wrong.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The fact that the scope is 1941 dated is very intresting.

Surelly your scope is CB marked ( It seems by the pics),and that means that it was calibrated for the Mosin Nagant rifle.


Best regards.
Where would this mark be located?
 

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Ohhh!!!!!!!!I arrived too late!!!!!!!!!!

My opinion is totally wrong.

Thanks.

Maybe it is not wrong.....:)


Regards.
 

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Nice looking rifle voland. Being a 43 is really nice. I'd love to see more pics and details. This bunch of rifles sure have some interesting features.



Mike
 

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Oh yeah, another sweet sniper from R-Guns. These certainly are wonderful rifles, and an outstanding opportunity for collectors and shooters to acquire an excellent example of one of the most famous and historical combat sniper rifles of WW2.

Cracked handguard? No problem. A couple of my 91/30 snipers, including one of my Finn captured examples, have cracked handguards. Nothing a little cryanoacrylate "Superglue" won't fix, and considering the battlefield conditions these rifles endured and their age, a small thing to put up with. As is the light surface rust in the bore - I've encountered this in other rifles that have been in long term storage (including some of my Mosin snipers) or that have sat in someone's basement, attic, garage, or closet for a long time (some as far back as the U.S. "War of Northern Aggression Against The South"), and as long as it cleans out with no problems, it can actually be a good thing. I've gotten many a rifle pretty cheap due to a dark and crappy looking bore that turned out to be only light surface rust, lint/dust, old dried oil or grease, etc. that disappeared with a good cleaning that revealed a mint, pristine, mirror bore underneath.

The 1941 dated SVT PU scope -this model is often referred to by collectors and sources in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union as a "Model 1940 PU scope", and the 91/30 version as the "Model 1942 PU scope" - is a nice bonus, and the stock appears to be the proper type for a '43 Tula, with the pressed in sling slot escutcheons - almost all wartime Tula snipers seem to have used these instead of the ones with the stamped and folded sheet metal "half-liners" most Izhevsk rifles used in the mid-late 1942 and 1943 period.

The bolt handle is rather unique for a Soviet Mosin sniper. Sniper bolt handles often lean a little bit forward or back, especially ones hurriedly manufactured in the late 1942 and 1943 period. However, this one seems to have been deliberately bent back some, in the manner of a commercial hunting rifle or the sniper rifle bolts used by other nations...it is not unusual to see Finn made Mosin sniper bolts with a bent back handle like this or that also differ in other ways from a standard Soviet sniper bolt. However, it is not completely unknown or unusual to encounter Soviet Mosin snipers that exhibit unique and "non-standard" features that were added or modified by the various organizations or individual shooters who these rifles were issued to over the last 60+ years.

I really like that bolt, and documenting it by featuring it on this site is a good idea, as it establishes that this is an original Soviet military feature, not something done here.

I don't know how many of these rifles have been imported by R-Guns, or how many might remain in former Soviet arsenals, but I have the feeling that these will disappear rather quickly, that these may be the last of the remaining Soviet Mosin snipers that will be imported or at least are likely to show up for quite a while, and that in a relatively short time the price of and demand for these will go way up. Get 'em now, friends, so you can feel real good about it later!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The bolt handle is rather unique for a Soviet Mosin sniper. Sniper bolt handles often lean a little bit forward or back, especially ones hurriedly manufactured in the late 1942 and 1943 period. However, this one seems to have been deliberately bent back some, in the manner of a commercial hunting rifle or the sniper rifle bolts used by other nations...it is not unusual to see Finn made Mosin sniper bolts with a bent back handle like this or that also differ in other ways from a standard Soviet sniper bolt. However, it is not completely unknown or unusual to encounter Soviet Mosin snipers that exhibit unique and "non-standard" features that were added or modified by the various organizations or individual shooters who these rifles were issued to over the last 60+ years.
After examination I have no doubt this sniper is genuine!!!
However the bolt handle is very interesting. The number on it matches the reciver, and it is the original factory number. It has all the right period tula markings ETC...

I will post more pics today.

I wonder if Vic can shed some light on this? Did you see any bolts like mine at R-Guns?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well the police connection might shed some light on my mystery bolt... Perhaps it is a recent mod.

Here are more pics.
 

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As I stated I can not tell you for a fact this is correct. It might well be plain wrong. The source is very good but even that does not mean it is correct.
 

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Well the police connection might shed some light on my mystery bolt... Perhaps it is a recent mod.

Here are more pics.
I had that exact rifle in my hands at RGuns last week. I was soooo itching to buy it but chose another instead. I just couldn't do because of the items you mentioned...the filthy bore, cracked handguard, and rearward bent bolt. I was willing to overlook the handguard, but the combination of the bent handle and filthy bore scared me away from that particular rifle. I'm glad to hear it cleaned up nice. I even asked one of the employees if he had a rod I could run through it, but was told no. That bore was so filthy there was nothing visible thru it and there was only one other I saw like that. The rearward bent bolt also had me concerned. Keep in mind my visit and purchase was before Vic visited RGuns so my confidence level wasn't as high then as it is now. (Thanks Vic!). Anyways, I'm glad your rifle's bore cleaned up well. I figured it would, but wasn't willing to take the chance for that kind of dough. Instead, I picked a '44 Izhevsk that I pictured in the First Impressions Thread.

The rifle you received has a lot of character, in a positive way! Congrats!
 

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Well, I saw that rifle too, wanted to buy it but could only afford one Izhevsk and one Tula, I knew that kinda 1903 Remington bolt was not bent because of some incident or being in combat, it looked like a nice job done either by professional armourer or at the plant. My confidence was high from the moment I saw these rifles and scopes/mounts week ago and I am going to make another visit soon, hopefully, before Vic and his friend come back again or even better - at the same time.

And like I said before, on my first and second visits I saw legit Tulas with scope numbers (more than one) on left side of barrel shank, I saw Izhevsk without scope numbers on left side of barrel shank due to being ground off, SVT scopes, different types and levels of refurbishing, different stocks, bolts, cleaning rods in white, original rifle crates and etc., etc.
Maybe we should conduct a survey of these rifles in near future?
 
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