Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 20 of 85 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,060 Posts
Yes, I believe at leave the lead Sherman (Fury) is an EZ-8 with the HiV. gun. Lots of discussions about this on the modelling forums. Those guys can really get into specifics! I had wondered if these running Shermans may have be Israeli surplus Ishermans or M51's. Consensus is, maybe, but probably not. It is believed these came from Bovington.
 

·
Gold Bullet Member
Joined
·
4,569 Posts
Yeap, from what I saw from the teaser, at least they got the Tiger I correct, you may duplicated one real Tiger in Hollywood to a company size. BB the M4, I believe were 76mm Firefly with muzzle break. About the movie, Time will tell!
 

·
Super Moderator
Field Editor ~ GUNS Magazine, Co-Author ~ Serbian Army Weapons of Victory &PH - Kudu Safaris
Joined
·
11,754 Posts
Hello Gents,

The elderly Gentleman who my Brother and I understudied for years in the foundry business was a tank commander in Patton's 3rd Army during the war. Bob McClelland commanded a platoon of tanks that landed on D+15. Due to losses, by the time Bob crossed the Rhine and entered Germany, he was in command of a Battalion of tanks. During that time, Bob had four tanks shot out from underneath him and lost more than half of each of the four crews of five men he served with in action. Bob told us that his company was frequently called on to form the spearhead of the continual attacks of the 3rd Army.

Bob used to compare a German AP round penetrating the lighter armor of the M4 Sherman medium tank as being pretty much like hitting a golf ball with a driver in a small tile bathroom.

I studied tanks quite a bit in my younger days and at least based on the trailer for "Fury", it appears that they are using an original M4A3E2 late war variation of the Sherman with upgraded armor and the high velocity 76.2mm gun as the "main character" in the movie rather than the earlier variations of the Sherman with the short barreled 75mm gun. Even then, when U.S. armored units encountered Tiger I's or Panthers, according to Bob, on average it cost 5 U.S. tanks to knock out a single German Tiger or Panther. Even with the 76.2mm AP round, to penetrate the frontal armor of either German tank, Bob said they had to get inside of 100 yards to have any chance at all, while both German tanks could put an AP round through the front of a Sherman's armor, the crew compartment and then clean through the engine and out the back of the tank from a range of 3000+ yards! OUCH!

Bob won his first Silver Star by going back to save the life of the paralyzed driver of his tank as it started to burn. He said they used to plaster mud over the white star insignia on their tanks to reduce the chance of being spotted. One night while they were in Belgium, it rained and the mud had washed off of the stars on his tank. They rolled out of a tree line, where they had spent the night, onto a dirt road that crossed an open farm field. From a range over 3000 yards, the German gunner of a Tiger I put the first 88mm AP round right through the center of the star on the frontal armor plate of his tank. The round killed the assistant driver, the gunner and the loader and took out the driver's spine via shrapnel in his lower back. Standing up in the turret as commander, Bob was wounded in both legs and his hip by fragments of the first AP round. Bob bailed out of the top of the turret as the second German round hit the star as well, the second shot slightly elongating the hole created from the first round! Two rounds in exactly the same place on the target from over 3000 yards away! Bob used to tell me that while the German gunners aimed at specific parts of the allied tanks, his crewed aimed at the German tanks as a whole based on the optics of their main guns.

The Sherman started to burn when Bob had taken cover in a drainage ditch on the side of the road. He looked back at his tank and saw the driver rise up, then fall back down into the hatch, then rise up again with the same results. About that time, a barrage of what Bob guessed were 155 HE rounds started to land in and around the field of his knocked out tank. Without thinking he ran back to the tank and while he was wounded again from a shell fragment from the arty, Bob lifted the paralyzed driver up and out of the tank and got him into the ditch alongside the tank as the ammo in his Sherman began to cook.

In what Bob used to say was one of those totally absurd surrealistic occasions in combat, with the 155s still landing all around, a totally lost medic's jeep showed up behind his burning tank with two stretchers rigged on the back of the jeep. With 155s rounds exploding everywhere but on top of the jeep, Bob strapped his severely wounded driver onto one of the stretchers, jumped on the other stretcher and told the driver to "GET THE HELL OUT OF HERE!" Through the rest of the war, Bob never knew what became of the driver whose life he saved. Years later after the war, at a 3rd Army reunion, Bob met the man whose life he had saved. He was confined to a wheelchair, but had lived to come home to his wife and children.

It was an honor to work alongside Bob for the 16 years we spent together. After returning from the war, he froze at the wheel of his car (PTSD!) and could never drive again. In the 16 years we worked together, six days a week I used to get up at 4am and drive over the 405 Fwy to pick up Bob in Brentwood and then return to Northridge in the San Fernando Valley where the foundry was located. At the end of the day, after traffic, I would drive Bob home then return to my condo in Porter Ranch, arriving home at around 8pm or 9pm at night. The stories Bob shared with me over the years were absolutely amazing. He passed away in his sleep at the age of 76. He was indeed a charter member in the "greatest Generation." It was an honor to understudy such a great man who had lived such a remarkable life.

Hopefully, "Fury" will measure up to the real life story of the German and Allied tank crews who fought to the death in support of the crew members who they served with.

God bless them all.

JPS

 

·
Gold Bullet Member
Joined
·
4,569 Posts
JPS: Thanks for sharing this touching story/memor.
"Hopefully, "Fury" will measure up to the real life story of the German and Allied tank crews who fought to the death in support of the crew members who they served with
." Very well said. God bless them all.
 

·
Super Moderator
Field Editor ~ GUNS Magazine, Co-Author ~ Serbian Army Weapons of Victory &PH - Kudu Safaris
Joined
·
11,754 Posts
One of the worst movies of all time...
It was so bad as to be unwatchable! One serious advantage that "Fury" has going for the movie is the fact that Tarantino has NOTHING what-so-ever to do with the film!

Thank God!!!!
 
1 - 20 of 85 Posts
Top