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This self defense was a justified response to illegal and inhuman treatment. I fully expect the participants will each be given medals and pretty ribbons in a White House ceremony.

Satire off.
You may resume your normal conversation.
 

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...There were further mutinies in the Phillipines at wars end, by troops refusing to work until they were given a certain date of repatriation. Likewise, Merrills Marauders mutinied after they were brought out of Burma because of ill treatment. Photo's of some of the Phillipine mutineers can be seen in the Truman library online.
 

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Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
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From the Johnson Presidential Library site:

On June 21, 1940, Lyndon Johnson was appointed Lieutenant Commander in the U.S. Naval Reserve (USNR). Reporting for active duty on December 10, 1941, three days after Pearl Harbor, he was ordered to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Navy Department, Washington, D. C., for instruction. He began working on production and manpower problems that were slowing the production of ships and planes, and he traveled in Texas, California, and Washington, assessing labor needs in war production plants. In May 1942, he proceeded to Headquarters, Twelfth Naval District, San Francisco, California, for inspection duty in the Pacific. Stationed in New Zealand and Australia, he participated as an observer on a number of bomber missions in the South Pacific. He was awarded the Army Silver Star Medal by General Douglas MacArthur and cited as follows:

"For gallantry in action in the vicinity of Port Moresby and Salamaua, New Guinea, on June 9, 1942. While on a mission of obtaining information in the Southwest Pacific area, Lieutenant Commander Johnson, in order to obtain personal knowledge of combat conditions, volunteered as an observer on a hazardous aerial combat mission over hostile positions in New Guinea. As our planes neared the target area they were intercepted by eight hostile fighters. When, at this time, the plane in which Lieutenant Commander Johnson was an observer, developed mechanical trouble and was forced to turn back alone, presenting a favorable target to the enemy fighters, he evidenced marked coolness in spite of the hazards involved. His gallant actions enabled him to obtain and return with valuable information."

In addition to the Army Silver Star Medal, Commander Johnson has the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal and the World War II Victory Medal.

On July 16, 1942, Johnson was released from active duty under honorable conditions. (President Roosevelt had ruled that national legislators might not serve in the armed forces). On October 19, 1949, he was promoted to Commander, USNR, his date of rank, June 1, 1948. His resignation from the Naval Reserve was accepted by the Secretary of the Navy, effective January 18, 1964.

Dates make it possible (96th Engr Bn arrived in Australia April 9, 1942, and at Port Moresby April 28th - doesn't give it much time to get in trouble at Townsville) , but fairly unlikely, Johnson was in fact involved.

As far as keeping things quiet, the military of the time tended to keep things like that under wraps as publicity would not be good for morale, and might give folks ideas (unwanted ideas).

Will be interesting to see what eventuates from the research.
 

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Diamond with Oak Clusters Bullet Member
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This self defense was a justified response to illegal and inhuman treatment. I fully expect the participants will each be given medals and pretty ribbons in a White House ceremony.

Satire off.
You may resume your normal conversation.
Could very well be what happens.
 

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I don't doubt it happened...there was a near riot here at about the same time,between American marines and Maori soldiers (allegedly caused by racial remarks from the marines towards the maori).But it was hushed-up and the 2 groups seperated to prevent similar incidents.All sorts of things happen that get swept under the rug...in the name of morale and order.
 

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Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
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This self defense was a justified response to illegal and inhuman treatment. I fully expect the participants will each be given medals and pretty ribbons in a White House ceremony.

Satire off.
You may resume your normal conversation.
Sorry - machine-gunning the officer's quarters is NOT a lawful or justified response to illegal and inhiman treatment (which doesn't seem to have been happening in any case, until more evidence surfaces). A trip to the IG, on the other hand, would be proper and likely to get results.
 

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Wasn't there some odd desertions to the Chinese/NK by some black troops of the 22nd (IIRC) Division during Korea? The men later posed for NK propoganda photos.

I remember reading a snippet about that long ago but....like many such matters....I could find nothing further.
 

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For gallantry in action in the vicinity of Port Moresby and Salamaua, New Guinea, on June 9, 1942. While on a mission of obtaining information in the Southwest Pacific area, Lieutenant Commander Johnson, in order to obtain personal knowledge of combat conditions, volunteered as an observer on a hazardous aerial combat mission over hostile positions in New Guinea. As our planes neared the target area they were intercepted by eight hostile fighters. When, at this time, the plane in which Lieutenant Commander Johnson was an observer, developed mechanical trouble and was forced to turn back alone, presenting a favorable target to the enemy fighters, he evidenced marked coolness in spite of the hazards involved. His gallant actions enabled him to obtain and return with valuable information."

Let’s see if I read this correctly: LBJ is riding as an observer on an Army plane that is forced to turn back from a mission because of mechanical trouble. There is no mention that the plane was attacked or any of the crew were injured. There is no indication that LBJ, the father of the War on Poverty, manned a gun, helped fly the plane or assisted an injured crew member. But because “he evidenced marked coolness…. His gallant actions…” merited him an Army Silver Star. He served a total of seven months of active duty from 12-10-1941 to 7-16-1942.

Give me a break! I guess my uncle’s winning his Silver Star at the Battle of El Guettar, Tunisia for saving the lives of his M2 half-track crew and his seven Battle Stars for North Africa, Sicily, Italy, Southern France and Germany pale in comparison to the great LBJ. My uncle was drafted in February, 1942 and was discharged in December, 1945, spending all but the first seven of his 47 months, overseas.

I wonder if LBJ was receiving his Congressional salary while on naval active duty, making him a double dipper.

"Bugler. Sound the charge." Captain Nathan Brittles
 

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There was a mutiny by some Buffalo Soldiers stationed temporarily in Houston during WWI caused by their treatment. A few soldiers and some civilians including IIRC a policeman were killed.

Also in the Spanish Ameican War the Buffalo Soldiers, while they were in Tampa awaiting shipment to Cuba, had some problems, I can't remember if it was with civilians or other soldiers.

LBJ should have been ashamed of hisself for accepting a Silver Star but probably wasn't.
 

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For gallantry in action in the vicinity of Port Moresby and Salamaua, New Guinea, on June 9, 1942. While on a mission of obtaining information in the Southwest Pacific area, Lieutenant Commander Johnson, in order to obtain personal knowledge of combat conditions, volunteered as an observer on a hazardous aerial combat mission over hostile positions in New Guinea. As our planes neared the target area they were intercepted by eight hostile fighters. When, at this time, the plane in which Lieutenant Commander Johnson was an observer, developed mechanical trouble and was forced to turn back alone, presenting a favorable target to the enemy fighters, he evidenced marked coolness in spite of the hazards involved. His gallant actions enabled him to obtain and return with valuable information."

Let’s see if I read this correctly: LBJ is riding as an observer on an Army plane that is forced to turn back from a mission because of mechanical trouble. There is no mention that the plane was attacked or any of the crew were injured. There is no indication that LBJ, the father of the War on Poverty, manned a gun, helped fly the plane or assisted an injured crew member. But because “he evidenced marked coolness…. His gallant actions…” merited him an Army Silver Star. He served a total of seven months of active duty from 12-10-1941 to 7-16-1942.

Give me a break! I guess my uncle’s winning his Silver Star at the Battle of El Guettar, Tunisia for saving the lives of his M2 half-track crew and his seven Battle Stars for North Africa, Sicily, Italy, Southern France and Germany pale in comparison to the great LBJ. My uncle was drafted in February, 1942 and was discharged in December, 1945, spending all but the first seven of his 47 months, overseas.

I wonder if LBJ was receiving his Congressional salary while on naval active duty, making him a double dipper.

"Bugler. Sound the charge." Captain Nathan Brittles
Actually, the record that was ultiamtey dug up suggests the B-26 LBJ was aboard lost a generator and turned back before they got to the target, and never encountered any eemy aircraft at all. but - the award was made by Bug-out Doug, to FDR's special representative. If you are thinking "politics played a role", I suspect you are thinking correctly.

Pretty sure that those members of Congress who wangled themselves onto active duty while keping their seats got either Congresional pay or military pay, not both.

I doubt that LBJ felt any shame over the award or accepting it.
 

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Diamond Bullet Member and the Revered Sir Jim
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Oh no. Not the old saw that officers get medals easier than enlisted men.
 

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Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
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Oh no. Not the old saw that officers get medals easier than enlisted men.
Maybe not easier - but a fairly senior Naval officer who was also a Congessman on an inspection trip for FDR would likely get a Silver Star where an ordinary Air Corps weenie would get an Air Medal or similar....
 

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If this winds up with significant publicity and the Rev. Jesse and that lyin' turd Sharpton take hold, it may wind up with the guilty parties whitewashed, like the Port Chicago mutineers.
 
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