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nwellons is correct, you are in for a surprise!
The revolver appears to be from a much earlier period than WWII, The sights are pre 1932 and the trigger guard is Imperial (pre 1916). The proof marks are all pre 1928. The side plate appears to have been scrubbed and there is a number on the inside. It would be interesting to see if that number matches the number on the frame. Also does the number in the trigger guard match the frame? It would also be helpful to get a closeup picture of the right rear of the frame. If the AC (acceptance Commission) mark can be seen, the frame can be dated to within a year or two.
The holster is a 1930s M1932. Very nice. Also, see if the cylinder matches there should be a number of the front face.
Joe
 

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There are a number of ways to date one of these. There were features that changed and, of course, marking changes. The numbering style on the frame says about 1926-1930 but the other marks are hammers, not stars so at least pre 1928. The front sight was changed to the notched version in 1932 so the revolver predates that. The circled hammer on the hammer is pre 1926 (prox). They stopped numbering the trigger guard in 1916, but it definitely isn't original to the revolver. I think that the revolver was probably refinished pre WWII that's when the sideplate was refinished.
I look forward to seeing more pictures.
Joe
 

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Mine has a similar history, but there's no question it came back from the war:
http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?216503-Captured-Twice
Seems pretty clear to me the Sov's refurbed these and stored them, they were captured on the Eastern front, issued to German troops then captured again by the Allies. Mine has a 1915 manufacture date, a star on the hammer with non-matching finish and a German guy's name and serial number in the holster.
I disagree that they were stored and then captured. The Soviets had many different repair programs and just collecting repair marks from 1918 on would be very interesting. When the Soviets repaired revolvers they were repaired to serviceable condition and they were immediately put back in service not stored. I agree that many of these revolvers were captured during Barbarosa and German troops brought them with them to the West when they were moved and there they became souvenirs of allied troops or war booty.

There are several ways revolvers came out of Russia and the Soviet Union and I think that a separate post on this is probably needed.
Joe
 

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Hi Joe,
can you comment on the matching serial number on the cylinder.
thanks
Not without seeing the whole cylinder front face. At first glance it looks good, but I cannot see all of the markings. When revolvers were repaired it was common to replace the cylinder and force match it to the revolver, need to see all of the marks!
Joe
 
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