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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Nagant pictured is believed to have been brought home by my dad after the war. How it came into his possession is a family mystery since he passed years ago without passing on the story. He was a member of the 2nd Division, 38th Infantry Regiment, Company D and fought in the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944. I'm guessing the gun is from the Tula Arsenal around 1943-1944, but I can't find the arsenal marks on the gun....any help placing the age, origin and value of the gun would be appreciated. The tag attached shows he must have claimed the weapon upon separation in July 1946.
 

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nwellons is correct, you are in for a surprise!
The revolver appears to be from a much earlier period than WWII, The sights are pre 1932 and the trigger guard is Imperial (pre 1916). The proof marks are all pre 1928. The side plate appears to have been scrubbed and there is a number on the inside. It would be interesting to see if that number matches the number on the frame. Also does the number in the trigger guard match the frame? It would also be helpful to get a closeup picture of the right rear of the frame. If the AC (acceptance Commission) mark can be seen, the frame can be dated to within a year or two.
The holster is a 1930s M1932. Very nice. Also, see if the cylinder matches there should be a number of the front face.
Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
He had a tag attached to the ring of the gun with his rank Pvt., 2nd Plt. and the frame number of the gun. Which I interpret as Private 2nd Platoon. So that's the clue that he brought it home from the war.
Thanks for your comments.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
WOW...that is a surprise...the number on the frame is 38062 and the number on the trigger guard is 15764 so they don't match. Is it possible this a WWI model that was remanufactured or refurbished for WWII. I can see what appears to be the top of a star on the right side above the screws, however I can't send a close up until next month. The gun is stored at another location and I be back there in July. I'll look for the cylinder number and the AC number then. Based on the sights, handle and other characteristics do you think it was from the 1900 Imperial Tula Ordinance Factory?

thanks for your response
 

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So, what happen with marks on the left side of frame?
 

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There are a number of ways to date one of these. There were features that changed and, of course, marking changes. The numbering style on the frame says about 1926-1930 but the other marks are hammers, not stars so at least pre 1928. The front sight was changed to the notched version in 1932 so the revolver predates that. The circled hammer on the hammer is pre 1926 (prox). They stopped numbering the trigger guard in 1916, but it definitely isn't original to the revolver. I think that the revolver was probably refinished pre WWII that's when the sideplate was refinished.
I look forward to seeing more pictures.
Joe
 

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US Army troops encountered large numbers of captured soviet weapons during the Battle of the Bulge, and the fighting afterwards. More than they had seen before. This is not mysterious since a great number of troops were pulled from the eastern front to participate in the Ardennes offensive.

The little revolver's history before the Germans captured it is the real mystery, one that I sadly cannot help out with. But I will stay tuned.
 

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Mine has a similar history, but there's no question it came back from the war:
http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?216503-Captured-Twice
Seems pretty clear to me the Sov's refurbed these and stored them, they were captured on the Eastern front, issued to German troops then captured again by the Allies. Mine has a 1915 manufacture date, a star on the hammer with non-matching finish and a German guy's name and serial number in the holster.
 

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Mine has a similar history, but there's no question it came back from the war:
http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?216503-Captured-Twice
Seems pretty clear to me the Sov's refurbed these and stored them, they were captured on the Eastern front, issued to German troops then captured again by the Allies. Mine has a 1915 manufacture date, a star on the hammer with non-matching finish and a German guy's name and serial number in the holster.
I disagree that they were stored and then captured. The Soviets had many different repair programs and just collecting repair marks from 1918 on would be very interesting. When the Soviets repaired revolvers they were repaired to serviceable condition and they were immediately put back in service not stored. I agree that many of these revolvers were captured during Barbarosa and German troops brought them with them to the West when they were moved and there they became souvenirs of allied troops or war booty.

There are several ways revolvers came out of Russia and the Soviet Union and I think that a separate post on this is probably needed.
Joe
 

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Very cool and interesting revolver for sure! Never seen one scrubbed like that. But I am by far an expert on these. I have three of them, that's it haha. Just happened to be in the right place at the right time and lucked out on a coin toss for one of them. Don't have a neat holster to go with any of them unfortunately. That's a neat one for sure! And of course, if it was brought back by a family member, then it's priceless!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi Joe,
Here are a few more pictures of the gun. The serial number on the cylinder matches the one on the frame. Unfortunately, it's removal wasn't obvious to me and I didn't want to attempt to dismantle the gun. The hammer looks like a double action one, so it looks like this gun covers several eras. The left side is completely smooth with no signs of an arsenal mark. The right side has what looks like the point of a star. I appreciate any other feedback you can supply on its age.
Thank you.
John
 

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Hi Joe,
can you comment on the matching serial number on the cylinder.
thanks
Not without seeing the whole cylinder front face. At first glance it looks good, but I cannot see all of the markings. When revolvers were repaired it was common to replace the cylinder and force match it to the revolver, need to see all of the marks!
Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Nagant body and cylinder numbers match

Hi Joe,
I had the opportunity to remove the cylinder on the Nagant this weekend. The picture of the front of it is posted here. The number on it, 38062, matches the number on the frame. Hopefully this provides enough information to date the original production time of the gun. It was also interesting to note the powder residue inside each chamber.
I look forward to your comment.
Thanks for your help on the identification and age of the gun. I have learned allot since the original post.
John
 
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