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Diamond Bullet Member and the Revered Sir Jim
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Wounded Sepoy and Gurkha soldiers in the hospital grounds of the Royal Pavilion in Brighton, Jan 9, 1915.
Bal Bahadur and Pim Bahadur, cousins, belonged to the 1/9 Gurkha Regiment, were both wounded by the same shell, on November 13, 1914. The shell killed 6 and wounded 10 others.
The Indian Army played a vital role in the first few months of the war. At a time when Britain was still recruiting and training volunteers, soldiers from across the Empire came to fight in Europe and support the British cause. The Indian Army provided the largest number of troops, and by the end of 1914 they made up almost a third of the British Expeditionary Force.
The Royal Pavilion was the first Indian hospital to open in Brighton with the first patients arriving in early December 1914. Over the following year, over 2,300 Indian patients were treated.
Lest we forget
馃尯
 

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They look like 15-16 year old boys, child soldiers. I am doubting they volunteered to serve in a country they never even heard of, let alone understood why British empire was envolved in that war.

I bet what happened was Brits came to what ever town they could and snagged as many abled bodied young men as they could. Gave them outdated rifles, dressed them up, didnt teach them anything close to mad minute, and then sent them into most dangerous positions of the front line.

Respect to these young men that lost their limbs and became crippled till death. I am hoping they were able to be productive and didnt commit suicide or started doing dope later in life.
 

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I bet what happened was Brits came to what ever town they could and snagged as many abled bodied young men as they could. Gave them outdated rifles, dressed them up, didnt teach them anything close to mad minute, and then sent them into most dangerous positions of the front line.
Not at all.

The British Indian Army had a long tradition of service, both on family & tribal levels.

They went on to provide the largest Commonwealth army in history during WW2.
 

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They look like 15-16 year old boys, child soldiers. I am doubting they volunteered to serve in a country they never even heard of, let alone understood why British empire was envolved in that war.

I bet what happened was Brits came to what ever town they could and snagged as many abled bodied young men as they could. Gave them outdated rifles, dressed them up, didnt teach them anything close to mad minute, and then sent them into most dangerous positions of the front line.

Respect to these young men that lost their limbs and became crippled till death. I am hoping they were able to be productive and didnt commit suicide or started doing dope later in life.
Are you kidding me?
Indians have been a part of the British Military for ever.
Never heard the phrase "God Bless Queen Victoria"!
 

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Oh come on! Look at the 3 guys missing their limbs in the photo, I dont believe they jumped up and ran to the queue line for the special forces.

They were plowing the field and carrying water when the Brit recruiter showed up and 30 weeks (transport time by ship, not some special forces extensive training) later they were running across no mans land.
 

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Perhaps your knowledge of the Indian Army is not up to snuff. A fair account can be gleaned by reading "The Indian Corps in France" published by John Murray, London, 1918.
Oh never mind the snuff, I dont believe 3 guys in the photo missing limbs ran over to the table to sign up to save the Queen and her 5 kilo diamond necklace.
 

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Cobblers!
Those nut-brown little buggers are the absolute best troops you could imagine!
They're born at 10,000 feet so their lungs hang down to the knees & they can out everything you all day!
The British have nothing but respect & admiration for them.
The only thing you never want to hear a Gorkhali say is: (Because he's already got his Khukri against your windpipe, & his foot behind your knee joint, his left hand over your mouth & nose & you never even sensed he was there), is
"Pssst! Johnnie" whispered very quietly in your ear!

Gurkha joke:
A squad of Gorkhali are tasked with a dangerous mission, it involves a night time parachute drop over mountainous terrain at dangerously low altitude of 500 feet.
The weather closes in & the cloud cover means it mus be reduced to 450 feet.
The Gorkhali agree instantly!
30 minutes to take off it gets worse. Its now a suicide mission, they agree again, but the officer tells them "This is so dangerous its strictly a volunteer mission, no-one is likely to survive the parachute drop, much less the mission"!
"Oh! you're giving us Parachutes"!


Indian Hospital ???
Nope British. Royal Pavilion in Brighton. Its nice enough Brit politicians hold their "convention" there right through today!
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Oh come on! Look at the 3 guys missing their limbs in the photo, I dont believe they jumped up and ran to the queue line for the special forces.

They were plowing the field and carrying water when the Brit recruiter showed up and 30 weeks (transport time by ship, not some special forces extensive training) later they were running across no mans land.
No one said that.
There's a long standing tradition (on both sides) of military service.
Not some facile "The Viet (whoever) dun kilt my pappy so I's gong to be a mud marine & Kick ass" Bullshit.
With apologies to real Marines everywhere.
 

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Oh come on! Look at the 3 guys missing their limbs in the photo, I dont believe they jumped up and ran to the queue line for the special forces.

They were plowing the field and carrying water when the Brit recruiter showed up and 30 weeks (transport time by ship, not some special forces extensive training) later they were running across no mans land.
As with much else in India, military service was largely based on the caste system. In many cases, units had trained and served together their entire lives. Generations of entire families served. This made replacement of killed or wounded personnel a challenge, especially given the language barrier among officers.
 

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The Indian Army was composed of well trained regulars not raw recruits. Their sense of honour, "izzat", would equal or vastly exceed that of most 'western' troops. It was a concept not confined to any particular culture in India.
Given the inclination, it would not be difficult to find photographs of wounded/disabled 'baby' faced US troops from that era, even given the short time they would have been engaged at the front.
 
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