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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, recently bought a Peruvian mauser 7,65 on a auction site. It looked ok but the description did said there where some rust on it. Called them and asked about the bore, they said it was fine. Which it also was. Stock in good condition.
Unfortunately when taken apart the barrel under stock was pretty much toast, the receiver have also some rust damages, one side worst than other.

Not giving up on it though. Thinking of putting a new k98 barrel with different caliber on it, if it fits? And my gunsmith give a ok on the receiver.
What's your take on it?
 

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That is really bad. I suggest you clean the rust as best you can, put a coat of grease on the pitting, and put it back in the stock. Keep it as a Mauser collector item.

You can totally ruin it by changing the barrel but I see no reason to do that. Your barrel is marginal for safety. I personally would not shoot it.
 

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oh, she has a German import stamp, 'Orion'
-> where did you get her from? To sell her in Germany or other CIP-countries, a re-proof would be necessary, cause no Belgian proof stamps visible on receiver, and probable bolt. But a reproof in that conditon is absolutely out of question.
As Geladen told, don't waste your time and money to make her shootable again. No responsible gunsmith in the EU would work on a receiver like that...
Does she have a nice stock? These are sought after in Germany, where lots of Peru 1935 got Spanish M43 stocks...

How did she get into that condition? Hard use in the jungle, especially the border war with Ecuador in the 1940's. Since dirt and earth accumulated under the wood line, the rust grew there...

hope this is helpful,
Chris
 

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Hi, recently bought a Peruvian mauser 7,65 on a auction site. It looked ok but the description did said there where some rust on it. Called them and asked about the bore, they said it was fine. Which it also was. Stock in good condition.
Unfortunately when taken apart the barrel under stock was pretty much toast, the receiver have also some rust damages, one side worst than other.

Not giving up on it though. Thinking of putting a new k98 barrel with different caliber on it, if it fits? And my gunsmith give a ok on the receiver.
What's your take on it?
For decades we've been steadily shooting those rifles over here (In 7.62 CATO though) in pretty much that same conditions in State-sponsored civilian shooting clubs, and ZERO issues.

That said, do as you feel more comfortable and safe with. I see classic moisture damage to the steel due to poor storage conditions and even worse care, something not unusual "in the tropics". I agree with your gunsmith since pitting is nasty-looking but still superficial; some oil and a good scrub with a bronze brush should take care of it but maybe it might even need a good boiling to completely stop the corrosion process for good (Otherwise you'll have to keep an eye on it to check for reappearing rust).

If in my hands, I'd clean it, put it back and shoot it, but that's just me; maybe their current local scarcity stops me from considering it a goner or just a showpiece. If planning to replace the barrel probably a Vz-24 one would be a better fit, although you'll have to transplant the sights and do some extra cosmetic work for correct looks.
 

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The Peru 1935 is quite common over here, and pretty cheap: large numbers were imported to Germany.
Actually now, there are 4 Peru 1935 on German egun.de for sale, all non-matching (2 in 7.65, 1 in 7.62 Nato, 1 in .30-06). They should sell about 150-250 €...
Chris

edit: 7.65x53 ammo for small $ is difficult to get here. 7.62 Nato is widely available, same with .30-06 (excellent Danish Mil surplus)
 

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I'd be more afraid of that receiver than the barrel. That is toast. I'm concerned for the minor pitting on my Sarco Enfield's....and your receiver makes mine look mint. Try to return it, or leave it as is as a relic.

Sent from my E6910 using Tapatalk
 

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That receiver and barrel are rough. Perhaps clean the rest off with Evaporust. An alternative would be to boil the barreled receiver and convert the rust to blueing. After boiling or Evaporust coat the receiver and barrel in RIG and put it back in the stock.

As for safety, I see nothing wrong with it. Anybody looked at the rear sight set screw hole in all these model 98 rifles? They are deep. If you are worried about it have somebody load a stout load, stout as in the maximum load per a loading manual, and fire it remotely. If it stays together and the brass looks OK then it should be good to go.

Remember the receivers are case hardened. The only reason for them to be hardened is to prevent wear of parts sliding against each other. It is the elasticity of the steel that keep the receivers intact, not the case hardening.

These are my opinions. You need to decide on your own what to do. Every rifle is inherently unsafe, some more so than others. The safest rifle is the wall hanger with the plugged bore and welded up firing pin hole.

Vlad
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So after visit to both gunshop with experience people and a certified gunsmith they both agree its OK to fire the rifle. The worst rusty area still leaves 4mm solid steel. They also noticed that the stock wasn't original since no traces of rust in stock after barrel.
And floorplate/triggerguard doesn't match cutout in stock properly. I also noticed that buttplate doesn't have those carvings or whatever they called.

My plan is to let gunsmith glassblasst the barrel and other steel parts and reblue and keep it as a shooter.
 

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If you plan to shoot it, you need to be very certain that the cross sectional area of the receiver is well in excess of the cross sectional area of the chamber. When you pull the trigger. SAAMI loads will have an excess of 6000 lbs pushing back at your cheek. From an engineering standpoint, if there is significant pitting and section loss, you would need to increase that by a facty of 2 or 3 due to stress concentrations. If you got the blessing of a competent gunsmith, I hope you have it in writing.
From my experience, guns don't have a whole lot of "excess" material in the receiver. They rely on design and ductility to survive. Rust pits are where cracks start. It may survive 1 firing, 10 firings, 100 firings...but unless you are Certain you have enough metal to keep the stresses comfortably below 36000 psi, don't shoot it. (Barrels are different, hoop stresses are very low compared to tensile stress in the receiver).

Sent from my E6910 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If you plan to shoot it, you need to be very certain that the cross sectional area of the receiver is well in excess of the cross sectional area of the chamber. When you pull the trigger. SAAMI loads will have an excess of 6000 lbs pushing back at your cheek. From an engineering standpoint, if there is significant pitting and section loss, you would need to increase that by a facty of 2 or 3 due to stress concentrations. If you got the blessing of a competent gunsmith, I hope you have it in writing.
From my experience, guns don't have a whole lot of "excess" material in the receiver. They rely on design and ductility to survive. Rust pits are where cracks start. It may survive 1 firing, 10 firings, 100 firings...but unless you are Certain you have enough metal to keep the stresses comfortably below 36000 psi, don't shoot it. (Barrels are different, hoop stresses are very low compared to tensile stress in the receiver).

Sent from my E6910 using Tapatalk
Thanks for your knowledge and advice, I will certainly have more discussion about the safety with the gunsmith. I'm glad that I could keep it with original barrel though. I won't be shooting it to much. I have my mauser m96 to do that job.
 
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