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Many gun collectors mis-assess the effect and the meaningfulness (or lack thereof) of auctions. Actually, single auctions tell you NOTHING about value and nothing about market price either. The only thing they tell you is the intensity of desire and/or rivalry of at least two people in a given single moment as to a given single object.

Many of you may know the common lost-and-found auctions. Time and again, one can observe an old umbrella going off for 25 , or a well-used bicycle for 100 €. Does that mean this is a realistic market prcie for such objects? Of course not! Every flea market visit, every look into a used goods' store will quickly teach you otherwise.

Here now is the wise remark by sbhva that I wish to conserve for posteriority:

sbhva
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1477 Posts
Posted - 01/06/2006 : 10:35:02 PM
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There were 2 things that made the little voice yell (and I am not even a military collector). One, as Dutchman pointed out, is that the carbine is not in original configuration, and second in these auctions you have to watch out for shills. I went up against one a few years ago and luckily the music stopped on him. Six months later the gun was back on auction by the same seller. I contacted him and offered what my high bid had been before the shill started bidding. He took my offer and ended the auction early. I got the gun for a reasonable price.

No offence to DaSwede (if you are the winner), but when I checked the feedback on Rboelter, it is all as a seller, not a buyer. That is what set off my shill alarm.

The bottom line is that the market will set the value of a particular gun. If this auction came down to a battle between to bonafide willing biders, then the market has spoken and the value for this particular gun at this point in time has been set. There is no guarantee what the market will price it at the next time it changes hands or even what the next school carbine that comes to market will fetch. What it does do is set a nasty precedent for anyone that wants to buy a school carbine. Luckily, the auction record will get purged from the site in a relatively short period of time. Let's all hope no school carbine owners have seen it (but I know one that has).

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Steve
 
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