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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
My buddy's nice vise and applying the inletting black on the action of the 1906:
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Sorry that I'm gushing about all the professional grade equipment. Lucky to have a friend show me the how and use of his tools. He's probably the most generous person I've ever met.
3839171

Easy to get that inletting stuff all over if you're not paying attention.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Now getting down to the fitting, inletting, sanding, filing and reblacking and fitting...
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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
More work on getting a pretty tight fit. Used emery boards, I learned they are used a lot. I need to raid my wife's supply.
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3839175
 

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When you get the trigger group fully seated into the wood by doing your inletting and before drilling the tang screw hole,,take a long bar clamp and place it around the front end of the trigger group and the other end around the butt of the stock.
Having blackened your metal up before assembling this up, now pull the clamp in tight,,as tight as it will go to pull the metal and stock together.
Then take the clamp off and pull the metal off and again take a look at the impression in the wood.

There will be areas of compressed/blackened wood where the metal is making hard contact. That's good. But also areas where the metal is just barely blackened showing that the former impressions are still holding the rest of what can be more contact from taking place.
There will also be areas where no contact is made.

Scrape down those hard contact areas a little and do the entire process again and as well as the inspection and any further scraping as necessary.
You should start to see more and more and better contact betw metal and wood and also any interference betw working parts and the wood. Keep the trigger, springs pins ect in the metal as you fit it to the wood to avoid having to go back after finishing up the gun and then assembling it only to find that the small parts are now in interference with the inletting.

When you are satisfied that the trigger group is seated and inletted properly, then it's time to secure it with the tang screw.

A good way is to use a drill press.

Place a small drill press vise on the table and put a center punch in the jaws with the point UP. The point should be large enough that it does not slip through the bottom tang screw threaded hole. You want it to just be able to center it.

Now with the proper size drill bit for your job in the chuck, bring the drill bit down and center the point of the drill bit onto the center point of the punch which is pointing upwards.
Move the drill press vise around and then clamp it securely so the two points come together exactly when the drill is pulled down in position.
If the drill press has a depth stop on it, set it so the point of the drill stops just befor it touches the point of the punch.

When the drill bit is 'up' you will need enough room to be able to set the trigger guard group metal with the stock placed in it onto that center punch point. The point goes right into the screw hole in the bottom tang.

I suggest you once again use the clamp to secure the wood tightly into the metal so it can't walk out of place during the drillng.

Then turn the drill on.

Holding the stock w/metal with one hand, position it so the drill bit when lowered with the other hand comes right down into the top tang screw hole.
Now drill, The drill bit is lined up with the point of the center punch which is lined up in the center of the threaded hole of the other end of the tang screw.
Drill through the stock. The depth stop will avoid a collision of the bit and the punch. If no depth stop, go easy when approaching full depth and back off if you hear or feel the two touch. You can even leave a short section to be cleared by hand off of the press so there's no damage to the bit.

This will give you a straight thru true hole.

If you want to use a 'draw' hole as a lot of guns that use a tang screw do use. You will need to mark the top and bottom hole locations on the wood by using the holes in the tangs as a template.
Then take the metal off of the wood.
Now with only penciled circles where the holes are centered, you must move the center of those holes TO THE REAR.
Both top and bottom holes must be marked & done the same amt. It doesn't take much and too much will make for a tang screw that can't engage the threads in the bottom tang.
How much to move the hole over?,,, 1/32" is plenty on a tightly inletted stock.

Center punch in the wood the new centers for each hole 1/32" to the rear of the outline of the originals.
Use the same set-up as above. Place the centerpunch point in the bottom now centerpunched wood mark. You may want to pre-drill the top with a smaller drill to establish a better center for the thru drill.

This move back of the hole makes the metal part (the trigger group) be drawn back (rearward) tighter against the head of the stock as the tang screw is tightened up.
The rule is to move the hole in the direction you want the metal part to move.

Once everything is done, you can cut to LOP and Pitch if needed.
Then you can fit the butt plate and can start final shaping and trimming of the stock.
Working around the metal while installed in the wood can be done w/o any damage to the metal finish. Just go slow and carefully.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
In parallel to inletting the new stock, I thought I would fix the old one as practice. The stock is cracked significantly and this was clearly why they drilled a cross hole and used a screw and hex nut to hold it together.

Pic of the old stock before repair:
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Used a 1/2 inch Forstner bit to dig out plug hold on both sides. The 1/2 size what the smallest that covered the hole made for the nut.
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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Bit to drill out the plug hold and fitting the brass screw shaft:

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You can see the crack pretty good in this pick. These guns were viewed at the time as cheap tools not the special objects/machines that we value them today.
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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
After stripping, I broke out my wife's iron to steam the bazillion dents and dings from the stock. I was amazed at how many this process raised and outright eliminated. Ive used this before on a K98K laminated stock from WWII and had marginal results, probably due to it being more glue than wood. This gumwood really bounced back well.
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Soaked the white towel with water. Filled the iron with distilled water and let it get really hot. I put it on maximum and also while pressing on the wet towel I hit the steam button. Probably overkill but really liked the results.
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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
I used Acraglas for the first time. After waiting for months for Brownells to have it in stock, I ordered it off eBay. I don't know what's going on at Brownells but I don't think anyone is watching the store... I cut a brass screw and put it where the old machine screw was and fit the plugs to the 1/2 inch cutouts on each side. I mixed up a batch and used some black dye in it. I used a thin spatula to push it down the crack as I spread it a little open. Then clamped it and wiped off any excess. Set my mixing popsicle stick in the excess and left out to dry. If it doesn't set up or stays tacky then I know I have a problem with my mixture.
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What started out was what I considered minimal ended up being 5X what was needed.
Spatula was from my grandfather's tools and was fun to use something from that pile of antiques.
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I've been asked about the black rubber mat I'm using. It's an old, all rubber, floor mat from a BMW. The front mats wore out and were thrown out but the rear mats were pretty much in unused shape. Turns out it makes an ideal work surface. It's soft so it won't dent wood and other materials. It's grippy so it sticks to the workbench and to the item being worked on. It's waterproof so I use it under all my chemicals and solvents and hasn't been affected by denatured alcohol, stripper, mineral spirits, gun cleaner, etc. It's easy to wash off in the hose or utility sink and catches sanding dust well. I then fold it and tap the dust into a clean deli container to use for filling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
I ended up using the softest plugs I found due to the very soft gumwood. They are pretty much white but I expect to balance it with the stain to the rest of the stock. I really screwed this up. I couldn't find the plugs I wanted (because I was impatient and running out of time) and made them from wood dowels. These plugs then have the end grain exposed as opposed to the side grain. Stain readily absorbs and it's now darker than the rest of the stock. Here's some pictures I took during the sanding. Since this is already fit the trigger group tangs I didn't want to over sand the edges and protected them with tape as I filed then sanded the plugs.

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Some deep gouges in the stock remain. Reading on how to fill these cavities, I see there are as many "recipes" as folks alive. On the last stock I did I used Oak filler with mediocre results. This time I decided to try the superglue and sanding dust method. It filled well but turned very dark. Good thing is that once sanded it looks like its a knot or grain in the wood vs a filled hole. At least that's what I tell myself. Here's a pic about 30% into the sanding effort.
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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
I stained the repaired/ruined stock with Birchwood Casey's Rusty Walnut stain. It turned out not brown enough and will do a dark walnut stain today after drying overnight. I am not sanding and restaining the action slide handle wood (it's in great condition) so I have a clear target to aim for. Here's the stock after the first coat of stain. Notice the slide handle wood. The final color needs to be a lot more browner.
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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
BobVZ and KTR, thanks for your tips on drilling the tang screw hole. I'll be doing that, some great tips there. I'm leveling my drill press table now.

Getting prepared to drill the new tang holes in the new stock. Here's a set of hole center punches that I've never seen before. I understand they are common for machinists to use. Just select the largest one that fits in the hole and give it a smack and you have a perfectly centered dent for the drill bit to follow. Wish I knew about these years ago.

3839285
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
Need more brown vs reddish so using Minwax 224 Special Walnut. More brown but not enough so will do another stain coat in a couple of hours.
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Its a shame Tapederas went out of business, they had some amazing alcohol-based stains that looked great.

Now you can see why I sent you the buttstock, thats way more than I can handle right now!
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
Its a shame Tapederas went out of business, they had some amazing alcohol-based stains that looked great.

Now you can see why I sent you the buttstock, thats way more than I can handle right now!
I think I would have been okay from the start if I had the normal walnut Casey stain. I have one on the way for the next one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Time to drill the tang screw hole in the stock! Used the advice from BobVZ and KTR. Lined up the tang holes to the drill press after leveling. Put the stock on and used a clamp to hold it tight. Started with a small bit and worked up to just fit the tang screw diameter.
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nice fit with the new screw. The stock before the inletting was loose side to side and not allowing the action all the way on. After the inletting, the stock fits tight lengthwise but is still loose side to side. I will use some Acraglas Gel to tighten it up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
Putting some release agent on the action and letting it dry. Using two coats to make sure.
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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Mixed the Acraglas gel with brown dye this time. Used black last time as recommended by the gunsmith Mark Novak. See his videos on Youtube. I've learned a lot from him.
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The gel has a nice even consistency that spreads nicely and stays put. Easier to work with than I thought it would be.
 
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