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Alright here are the specs (wood only)

1906 - 4" tall at buttplate
1.105" wide at buttplate
13" long from toe to where wood
meets metal at bottom.

62 A - 4.687" tall at buttplate
1.440" wide at buttplate
13 1/2" long from toe to metal
 

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I had my micrometer out too, the tang distance between top and bottom on my 1906 at the back is 1.455"

Also, I found multiple tang screws that could be it, I suppose I could send them to you and you send back what you don't use.
 

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Lots of "patina" is really rust under the oil. Yeah it looks old but the gun continues to deteriorate. Here's a pic of what I mean. I'll post an after when done.
View attachment 3832721
Something to note, the receiver color your mentioning is not patina .The heat bluing top layer has flaked off leaving the straw brown stage behind.It is oxidation but not from rust just part of the furnace bluing that Winchester did.
Rifles of this era often flake either partially,wholly , to silver or any layer of the oxidation process .
That's actually a very clean rifle ,myself I would not do anything other than clean and oil to the metal.
And actually that stock even though looks bad could be salvaged easily .
I would probably remove screw and replace with a brass threaded rod,glued in with epoxy.
Counterbore each side for a wood plug carefully matched for grain and color.
 

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At the pawn shop Winchester 06 5-21-2016.jpg I got a Winchester 1906 that has a 1909 upper, 1909 lower, and a brand new barrel installed with a pipe wrench:(
 

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My favorite, which I think I still have pics of, was a "WinGeco" where it was an 1890 made in 1908 with a GECO single-shot .22 barrel with bands brazed on. My guess is some Depression-era gunsmith did it when labor was a lot less expensive than parts

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Tang screw I have, its a bit short though

Also, aren't tang screws oval-head?
20210519_201016.jpg


Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
 

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How is the stock-fitting going now?
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Hey, I'm back from traveling for work for the first time in 14 months. Really feel for those folks who have had to wear a mask for the whole day.

I decided to fit and finish the stock supplied by Fushigi Ojisan to the 1906. It's just a little fatter than the stock on the 1906 now and one inch longer. It is quite a bit smaller than the 62A stock shown by Iron Worker earlier in this thread. In parallel and pretty much just an exercise to learn some skills, I'm also refinishing the original stock.

Here's the old and new buttplates: I picked up a new one on eBay.
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It's slightly taller and wider. Perfect for the new stock.

Needed to find two screws to fit it to the stock. A retired gunsmith friend of mine lent me his screw jar and I rummaged through and found two screws that match the old ones.
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Most of the replacement screws on eBay are Philipps which is/looks wrong for an older firearm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Looking at the new stock and the new buttplate:
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Looks like I've got some sanding ahead of me... Looking forward to this as the walnut stock has beautiful grain.

My game plan is to mark my holes and draw an outline around the buttplate. I'll then sand down to the line then reinstall the buttplate and finish the sanding. I'm planning on using my Ridgid sander to get close then do all the subsequent sanding by hand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
First fit to the new stock. Looks like the stock stands "proud" on both sides and some inletting needs to be done to slide fully on. I picked up a jar of Jarrow's inletting stuff to try that out.
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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
A question for the pros: I'm planning on doing the inletting first to get a good fit, then drill the hole for the tang screw. After reading several ways to do this, it looks like drilling half way then drilling from the other direction is recommended. One resource recommended drawing a line on the outside of the stock to keep the drill bit aligned to the right direction (at least in one dimension). Is this the right approach or any other recommendations that folks have?
 

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For the tang screw I recommend using a drill press, drill press vise, and drill bit. Level the press table. Place the vise on the table and secure the action slightly. Tighten proper drill bit in the press chuck. With drill press off, lower the quill/raise table while guiding the drill bit through both holes in the tangs. Tighten action securely in vise. Secure vise to table. Raise the quill then insert the buttstock between tangs to proper position and clamp. Drill hole. It should be perfect if everything held as aligned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Okay, been pretty busy the last couple of days on this.
Inletting the new stock. Looked at my chisels:
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Looks like someone used them to cut nails... These aren't going to work. My buddies chisels:
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