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Discussion Starter #1
I've got an 1897 here I don't think has ever been cleaned in it's 100 year plus history. I have it stripped down and, in addition to decades of powder fouling and residue, have found spots of rust on parts and screws here and there.

I want to disassemble the bolt and remove the firing pin from the bolt for thorough cleaning. After my initial attempts failed to drive the firing pin retaining cross pin out did not work, I soaked the assembly in penetrating oil for seven or eight days straight. Still, I can't get the retainer pin to even budge. I have been using a 1/8" punch. Any suggestions or advice on removing the stubborn firing pin cross pin are appreciated.
 

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Examine the pin first to make sure it is not staked on one end or tapered. Drive it opposite the stake/taper if present. You may need a starter punch and place the bolt on a bench block backed by a firm surface. Once moving the stnd punch should work.

Bob
 

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According the the disassembly instructions I have for the Model 97: Drift out the cross pin at the rear of the bolt toward the left, and remove the firing pin toward the rear.

You might try a little heat to loosen things up.
 

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Use a very short tip starter punch like Bob suggests to get the pin started moving. A long punch can loose a lot of it's power when struck just because of that slender length.

Use a punch as large as possible on the pin,,sounds like you are. You don't want to upset the pin surface and peen in inside the hole.

Try moving it from either side. It's a straight pin,,no taper.
The usual rule is to tap them into place right to left (looking at the bolt assembly from the rear),,,then remove the pin tap on it from the left side .

But rules can be tried and then set aside a lot of time when working on this old stuff. No telling how many times the pin has been in and back out and back in. If it's an orig size pin,,or even if someone has decided it may have needed some help in staying in place by adding a touch of thread locker, superglue or the real old locktite,,,iodine (makes it rust in place)

Try it again.. support the bolt in a very sturdy set up. You want a dead solid surface,,nothing that vibrates when you wack at the pin. A heavy vise, heavy wood lead or steel support under the bolt.
The bolt sides are flat except for the rail. You can build up a support surface to make it lay flat including that rail. Sometimes you need and extra hand to help hold the part while you punch it.

If all that fails, I would not hesitate to use some heat at that end to loosen it up.
All that penetrating oil should have some of it down into the pin by now. Heat it till it starts to smoke a bit and try again.
The locking bolt area is the L shaped area at the front of the bolt where the carrier locks up underneath. So any heat shouldn't run up to that area.

While your at it, make sure you can remove the firing pin lock screw on the left side of the bolt. That is sometimes hard to remove too and gets rusted in place.
A little heat there can help too.
Once out the small lock plate just drops out the bottom of the bolt.
Good to clean that up as well as it's channel slot in the bolt.
That makes sure the firing pin can't move while the action is unlocked.
 

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Put in deep freezer In a bag a day... then still cold .use the punch as your doing..sinkage..
if still not moving use the heat as suggested ..
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Big thanks for everyone's response and advice. I got the firing pin out and was able to thoroughly clean the entire assembly; much appreciated!!
 
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