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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I’m trying to piece together a Czech VZ24 98 rifle but I’ve been having a hard time finding a trigger guard and action for it, I’ve found German 98k parts though and was wondering if they fit together or not?
 

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Welcome to Gunboards!

The Czech VZ98/22, VZ23, and VZ24 (and others) as well as the German K98k (and others) were developed from the German G98 and have the same trigger guard. If you have other questions we will need to know exactly what rifle you have, as a "Czech 98 rifle" is not a designated model.

"98 rifle" is a term that includes almost as many different models as does the term "Mauser".
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you.
Im piecing together a Czech VZ24 sorry I forgot to mention that in the beginning. I’ve just started getting into the older model guns. Is there a good place to buy parts? I’ve tried tooling at eBay and a few other sketchy sites but I’m unsure
 

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Try:
https://www.gunpartscorp.com Look under Mauser, then VZ24

Or:

Or Ebay. VZ24 parts should be easy to find, or else some K98k or G98 parts will work.

Check back here with any questions.
 

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Libertytreecollectors and Apex also have some parts. Libertytreecollectors is my favorite place, Gun parts sometimes sends out new parts. Sarco sometimes has a few.


Unfortunately parts have really gone up in price from 15 years ago, correct matching bolts and stocks are the hardest to find .

Few sell the receiver, if you need the action- a receiver and barrel, at todays prices you got a parts lot. But, I suggest you buy a complete vz24. Building from parts generally is more expensive than just buying a correct rifle. There are plenty of VZ24 s at gun shows, the trick is to find an all matching, crested version with a correct sling.

Do you have a gunsmith special where he took the receiver and trigger guard off to build a nice hunting gun and you ended up with a worn barrel and wood set with metal?
 

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Any Mauser type turnbolt rifle with the third locking lug and other clearly identified basic features falls into the category "Model 98 action". There are length parameters and variations in front ring diameter and so on, but simply put, the standard medium length "large ring" action thus described is inherently a "Model 98" and the model and country of origin and other designators are the stuff collectors emphasize.


In fact, early '98 Turkish, Polish, Czech, and even Belgian production often incorporated, right on the factory line, already rather old German and/or Austrian spare parts. This confuses and sometimes irritates collectors, who imagine military production to be somehow "collector-organized", a fantasy far beyond the dimensions of reality. Indeed, on European rifles, among the older firms, seeing multiple fonts and type faces on truly original parts or duly authorized arsenal repair parts, frequently the cause of ridiculous hissy fits on the part of pretentious and ill-informed collectors, is very near to "the rule" in some historical periods, especially so with the outflow of cosmopolitan factories related to the old Hapsburg Empire, which often had to please many masters.

True interchange is never as easy as the outsiders would have you believe, and some parts will require fitting. There are reasons barrels were short-chambered, requiring fitting, just as there are reasons traditional pistol match barrels, tightly fitted, will ALWAYS produce superior performance.


The term "1898 Mauser" refers to the locking and breeching and magazine systems.

This is discussed in some detail in the 1994 GUN DIGEST article on the topic which was awarded the juried AMBER PRIZE, and the measurements there are useful.

It is possible--and was done in connection with that article, but "edited out"--to construct a very high quality and superbly accurate rifle using parts and peripherals, all new, from Argentina, Germany (several manufacturers), Austria, Turkey, Israel, Poland, Iran/Persia (yes, they're the same country), Belgium, Brazil, Mexico, Czechoslovakia, and several others. When that piece was executed, that assembly's cost wasn't high at all. Now? Many times that.

It was done simply to prove the ubiquitous nature of the design and its practicality.

However, to do this without proper tooling, gauges, and the attentions of a first quality 'smith is impossible.

Just for an example: My nephew recently purchased a commercial Zastava hunting rifle. Its entire bolt directly "swapped out" with my ancient 1899 Gew.98 ( since sold ) and the Czech postwar VZ98/K98K. That doesn't mean the bolts headspaced properly or would be safe in that incarnation. But they DID interchange physically.
 

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So the "Zastava rifle" purchased is not an M48 which has an intermediate length bolt (1/4" short of a G98 or K98k or VZ24 standard length bolt), copied from the FN1924 bolt.

I just bought a so-called "FN1924" Ethiopian carbine from Royal Tiger which takes an FN1930 bolt (same as K98k).

And the book Mauser Military Rifles of the World in five editions never did figure out the difference between an FN1924 and an FN1930.
 
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