Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why were the interwar commercial .30 brownings (1928's) , built with the captive recoil spring? Why not just continue with the 1917 style bolt set-up. I have not seen a M2 close up, but its my understanding this is the set up in the .50.

What were the perceived advantages and dis-advanages? It certainly seems less dangerous when handling the loose bolt assembly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
The captive spring was an improvement on the original design that was chosen not to be adopted by the us government for whatever reason. It's primary advantage was safety compared to the quite dangerous rod of death held within the bolt of a typical gi 17 or 19 bolt. As for disadvantages, I can think of none other than the cost of upgrading an arsenal to the new type which would require modifications to the right sideplate and the bolt of existing guns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,477 Posts
My suspicion is that the standard 1917/1919 recoil spring setup was kept because it was already the standardized part. Military funding was sharply cut in the 20s and 30s, and to recall and modify all of the Browning 30 caliber guns in use for what is essentially an optional "fix" would not have appealed to the beancounters. Yes, the original design was dangerous if handled improperly, but it did the job and still continues to do so nearly 100 years after its design.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top