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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought the mum had to be ground off or defaced on these rifles to bring them back,were these GI sneak back rifles?This type 99 has full mum and almost all the nice blued finish remains bore looks ex to mint,,uncommon?.
 

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No such restrictions were in place before the surrender of Japan, and a LOT of the rifles that are in the US today came to the US directly from the islands they were captured on.

The supply ships that were chock full of war materiel on the way TO the Pacific war zone were unloaded and almost completely empty on their return trips to the US and this means there was a whole lot of space for all sorts of miscellaneous cargo on those return trips.

Just about ANYTHING (including captured rifles) could be mailed directly to any home address in the country, and the soldiers were not charged postage from 'the front'.

Anyone who has seen Band Of Brothers certainly remembers the guy who was looking around for a box where the mail was being handled for the Company. He was looking for a box to ship YET ANOTHER $ilver tea set home that he looted from 'unoccupied buildings' in Germany. That soldier went home (if he made it) to literally thousands of dollars' worth of silver, even at scrap prices.
 

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I echo the above: seems like a lot of random stuff was sent back. My grandfather once told me that a guy he knew on Iwo was attempting to mail a jeep home, piece by piece, until the powers that be put the kibosh on that.

Tom
 

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No, the style of the mum and Type 99 font tell us it's a Kokura product. Although the rod is a late style Nagoya rod.Jon
Thank you for that. After looking for closely I see it has an earlier 3 screw band as well.
 

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My dad mailed three battlefield pick up Type 99's home from the Philippines. At the time the rifles were picked up they were carried and used by their Filipino scouts. When the fighting was over there they knew my dad had picked up the rifles. They returned them to him. He found scrap wood from torn up buildings and other damaged structures and made boxes and mailed them home. I have the rifles, I wish I had the boxes too they disappeared long ago.
 

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I saw on 99 online a few years back. The soldier put the postage stamps on the stock and mailed it home without a box or wrappings. I guess packing was not his forte' I think the boxes have a special appeal. I have two boxed rifles. They are now very scarce. Probably now one box left for every 10,000 rifles?
 

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Just my two cents on the subject of ground, defaced,scrubbed mums on Japanese rifles. I bought my first Japanese rifle 55 years ago for $12.00 ( no I don't still have it but I do have the DUV41 K98 that I bought with it for $10.00) the story was back then that if a rifle was captured and could be sent home soon then most mums stayed intact. If you kept it in your possession for a short time then the mum was kept intact, but if the rifle was just thrown in a pile for later then the mum was defaced so that if the Japanese captured it back they wouldn't use because of the defaced mum. Just what I was told back then and something that sounds like it could be true. I have seen mums ground totally off, I have seen them penned over, I have seen them with file or saw cuts through them. I always collected ones with the mum intact but over the years knew other collectors that sought out the ground mum ones saying " as least I know it's been there" What ever works for you. You hav a very nice one there and should be proud to own it. As far as shipping stuff home I have seen all kinds of stuff in all kinds of wooden boxes. Like the post office says now " If It Fits It Ships" happy collecting. MikeR
 

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No such restrictions were in place before the surrender of Japan, and a LOT of the rifles that are in the US today came to the US directly from the islands they were captured on.

The supply ships that were chock full of war materiel on the way TO the Pacific war zone were unloaded and almost completely empty on their return trips to the US and this means there was a whole lot of space for all sorts of miscellaneous cargo on those return trips.

Just about ANYTHING (including captured rifles) could be mailed directly to any home address in the country, and the soldiers were not charged postage from 'the front'.

Anyone who has seen Band Of Brothers certainly remembers the guy who was looking around for a box where the mail was being handled for the Company. He was looking for a box to ship YET ANOTHER $ilver tea set home that he looted from 'unoccupied buildings' in Germany. That soldier went home (if he made it) to literally thousands of dollars' worth of silver, even at scrap prices.
And there was Radar in MASH who mailed a jeep home one piece at a time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Thanks guys for the comments!I live 45 miles from Ottumwa Ia where Radar was from,wonder if the jeep is around somewhere?Anyway here is a pic of ser. no. on this rifle,might make the maker clearer(first and last pic).Of the Japanese rifles I have seen around here ,at least 95% have a ground or defaced mum.Here is a later minty matching type 99 that had the mum roughly removed ,I know its a part of its history but sure ruined the looks of this rifle,wish it had not seen the grinder!
 

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Probably around 80% of my collection is not ground. If a piece is matching and in nice shape and with the original finish - the "daisy" is just the icing on the cake. That's what up-grading is all about. The only thing mismatched (that I know of) in my collection is my T-44 1st variation cavalry carbine. It has a mismatched floor plate. Also, one grip of my TG&E Papa is mismatched. I have one matching mag, thanks to Jim Kemp! :)
To me T-99 rifles, more so than all the other stuff, really need to be matching pieces to properly exhibit what was going on at each arsenal and within each series. There are some radical changes in T-99 production. All the earlier stuff has a fairly small number of variations to them. If the 1923 earthquake hadn't happened all we would need for a rifle collection is a T-38 rifle and carbine and a T-44 carbine all made at Tokyo Arsenal.
 
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