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I bought these two No4 Mk1* rifles a while ago. They have grease/cosmoline (on the bolt and in the barrel but if it is cosmoline it is certainly not nearly as much as I've seen on a lot of other guns) on them and don't look like they went through a refurbishment and look to not have been shot for a while. I believe the guy that I got them from said he hadn't shot them. One is a Savage and the other is a New Zealand marked Longbranch. When I got them I bought some ammo and was all excited to shoot them but then kind of got intimidated by taking apart the bolts on these enflields. It looked a little more difficult than a lot of the other bolt action milsurps that I own. Well, I think I've finally watched enough youtube videos to tackle disassembling the bolt and doing a thorough cleaning in order to shoot one/both of these rifles. I was wondering if one of these looked more valuable that might benefit from keeping it the way it is now or is it not going to have any affect on any future collector value to clean both up and shoot them.
Thanks

http://s1287.photobucket.com/user/l...42 Longbranch No4 Mk1star New Zealand Enfield

http://s1287.photobucket.com/user/lowcountrygarand/slideshow/1942 Savage No4 Mk1star Enfield
 

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You have a pair of very nice rifles there! I can't imagine how disassembling and cleaning them could reduce the value. I'd clean them both up and shoot them. Don't be intimidated by disassembly/reassembly of the bolt. It's a relatively easy proposition, and requires only one special tool which is a tube with a notch cut in one end to slip over the firing pin inside the bolt body and unscrew it from the cocking piece/knob and a method of turning it. The professional models usually are a "T" handle. You will want to maintain a little pressure on it as you do so because when the firing pin is released its spring will be also. Then on reassembly it will require a bit of pressure to compress the spring enough that you can get the threaded end of the firing pin started back into the cocking piece. The only other area of potential problems can perhaps be avoided, and that is the extractor assembly. It is powered by a little "v" spring. one leg rests on the top of the extractor and the other leg is above that and retained in the bolt head by a little nub that fits into a hole. To disassemble these parts you need to push down on the spring though the nub's retention hole and at the same time push the spring forward on it's "v" from the rear of the bolt head. It will come out the front. The problem here lies in the fact that these springs are about 70 years old, and every time a cartridge was fed into the chamber or an empty ejected the spring flexed. So, it is not uncommon at all for them to break when reassembly is attempted. Not to worry, as replacement parts are usually not that hard to find, and in fact new springs have been produced from time to time. To replace the spring in the bolt head first replace the extractor and then gently squeeze the spring legs together with a pair of needle nosed pliers and push it in over the extractor. You may be able to satisfactorily clean the bolt head with a small brush and some solvent and avoid disassembling these parts. Again--very nice rifles. You will enjoy them.
 

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you've got a couple of great looking rifles, and from the looks of them you should have no problems disassembling, cleaning and reassembling them. There is nothing magic or difficult in the assembly of a no 4 rifle. If the bolt is packed with cosmo you do want to disassemble it and clean it out. The only thing I would suggest is buying yourself a firing pin removal tool and make sure you've got all the straight-blade screwdriver bits to properly fit the various screws you'll need to remove. There's a guy on ebay that sells a firing pin removal tool for 24.95 that he makes in his machine shop. It'smoney well spent
 

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you've got a couple of great looking rifles, and from the looks of them you should have no problems disassembling, cleaning and reassembling them. There is nothing magic or difficult in the assembly of a no 4 rifle. If the bolt is packed with cosmo you do want to disassemble it and clean it out. The only thing I would suggest is buying yourself a firing pin removal tool and make sure you've got all the straight-blade screwdriver bits to properly fit the various screws you'll need to remove. There's a guy on ebay that sells a firing pin removal tool for 24.95 that he makes in his machine shop. It'smoney well spent
This is very good advice. When I was in my 20's (in the 70's)- I made extra money by buying surplus ( but new ) Canadian No.4 stocksets, and placing them on No.4 rifles with stock "issues", and others with headspace problems, and missing parts. I even had a couple of nice Long Branches with NZ prop. marks like yours. Rifles in this condition were common, and sold for well under $100. then, but try to find them now for under $400.
 

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No need to completely disassemble the bolt, just unscrew the bolthead & stick in a solvent bath, swill around, blow dry, repeat if you feel its necessary, oil & reassemble.
+1.

Unless there is something REALLY wrong going on in there like a bent or broken firing pin, the bolt doesn't NEED disassembly. People get spoiled because it is so easy to do on most other bolt rifles.

I DO know a guy that needed to replace an Enfield firing pin once. That is apparently why he got such a nice rifle for such a cheap price at the time. That's about it for my experience with bolt disassembly.

The most 'maintenance' I have ever given an Enfield bolt is just about as described above. If I REALLY think the bolt needs cleaning, I will spray some brake cleaner into the space between the firing pin and the bolt body to flush everything out, followed by some oil after all the crud and cleaner leaks out and the rest of the cleaner evaporates. Work the bolt a bit to get the oil where it needs to get, and done.

I have owned Enfields since 1964 (a 1925 Ishapore-built No.1 Mk.III* was my very first rifle) and I currently own eight of them, and I have always been pretty OCD about keeping my guns clean. In all that time, I had never found the need to completely disassemble ANY of those Enfield bolts.

As far as which to shoot, your Savage seems to have a bit more wear on it, and I am a sucker for rifles that look like they have 'been there'. I would start with that one. If you aren't happy with how it shoots, I would then try the Long Branch.
 

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OK, couple of hints. If you MUST replace the extractor spring, Make a double loop of dental floss and pull the spring into place. (A single loop will break) If the spring is OK, Don't mess with it!
Removing the firing pin. Keep in mind you MUST remove that little screw in the bolt head that locks it in place!!!! Just because there is grease on the firing pin is no reason to remove it
 

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Oh, and one other thing. You MIGHT want to change the rear sight on whichever rifle you plan on shooting. I found it quite frustrating trying to hit anything using the 300-600 yard flip sights like you have.

It will likely be worth your while (and increase your enjoyment) to get a Mark 1 (micrometer elevation adjustment) rear sight for your rifle. They are easy to install and change, and you do not need to keep the 'good' sight on the rifle if you want to keep it original.

If you end up with one of the sheet metal notch-adjustable rear sights, be aware of the fact that you will need to fashion a spacer to take up the side-to-side 'clearance' you will have when the sight gets mounted in place. I made my spacer out of a couple of very small lock washers.
 

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Oh, and one other thing. You MIGHT want to change the rear sight on whichever rifle you plan on shooting. I found it quite frustrating trying to hit anything using the 300-600 yard flip sights like you have.
That's because people are easier to hit than a 5" shoot'n'see. ;)

I'l echo what John says about the extractor and its spring, just leave it alone if it's not broken. This counts double for Enfield No.1s.
 
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