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I stock up water as well. In a blackout scenario the pumps on the wells run for 48 hours. At that point clean water is much more valuable than food or TP. Go and ask an AFG vet who was on long term patrol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
big ----- I agree without water life won't last very long, maybe 3 or 4 days. My well is 300 ft. deep and the static level of the water is 50 ft. from the surface. If power for my electric motor driven pump should be out for more than a day we have a 110v / 220 v. generator that is capable of running the pump for a few hours each day. If gasoline is no longer available to run the pump, we'ed pull the electric pump out of the well and run our hand operated pump down to below the static water level . One way or another we'll have water.
If all else fails there is a fresh water source about 250 ft. from my back door. Its a lake 3/4 mile long, 1/4 mile wide and 200 ft. deep. More water there than I could ever use.
 

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TP is a luxury and a habit more than anything else. If you had to do without it, could not find any more, it’s buy TP or buy food kinda deal, then within a week you’d get used to using a squeeze bottle, wet washcloth (which can be easily washed in the laundry and reused) or some other solution. Not something we like to think about, but nevertheless true. I keep a few bales on hand to get through a nuisance situation like we had in 2020, but I don’t consider it a serious survival staple.

The red wheat is a great idea, however.
Roger all that.
One word: Bidet. ;-)
(Assuming you have water and water pressure. If you do, a hand shower sprayer and hang your butt over the tub will also work.)

~~~~~~~~~
I'm a spoiled survivalist-whacko brat: I have a flowing well. Not enough "head" or pressure to run the shower but it can trickle-fill a tub.
 

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The usual city dweller, living in a multi story house in a flat, can't use neither. Water will stop after 48 hours and after that you will have a gigantic blockage of all waste pipes. You will need Ghost Busters or a spade to go into the next city park to take a dump. For "gray water" I have a cistern and a 500m wide river behind my house. And a bucket and a rope. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
When I was much younger back on the farm, we used a surface pump which had a down hole plunger type pump set at nearly 100 feet depth. A sucker rod string operated the down hole plunger and supplied plenty of water for house hold use.. I hope we'll never have to resort to that kind of water supply. But as I mentioned, if push comes to shove etc. Thanks for your advise.
 

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Food Ingredient Cuisine Baked goods Dish


In the midwest this was the traditional off grid TP.

yeah, the romans did just fine with a sponge on a stick and water to clean their butt.........and there was no panic buying then. meanwhile over half of the world population uses their hand and some water to clean their butt, and you call yourself "survivalist" where you have to hoard toilet paper in order to survive some "end of world scenario"

What, you didn't hear about the great sponge shortage of 56 BC?

clean drinking water as we all know is #1.
A lot of governments out here in the west have ordinances against collecting your rainwater.
 
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The pink cobs were more common than white ones. The saying was use a pink one than a white one to see if you needed another pink one!
Cobs are a little harder to come by, now they grind it all. The stalk, corn, cob and leaves, Feed it all to cattle.
 

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Big Coulee.
Have you ever heard of a "bubble pump"?
They're neat but a bit uncommon.
Basically you run small-bore pipe down inside a larger pipe.
At the top is basically a bicycle pump.
What you do is pump high pressure air down through the small bore pipe to the bottom of the full-bore pipe till fluid exits at first & wait a few seconds then pump again, one stroke at a time.
If you have a check valve at the surface you don't need the initial pressurization.
The "pulsed" bubbles exit under pressure matching the head pressure & expand as they rise, lifting the water column with them. You can aslo use an air compressor using short "puffs" if you have one.
The advantage is the pause between pumps so the operator can pump longer, because its less tiring & the mechanics are all at the surface.
Its also depth independent up to the level of the air pumps pressure ability.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Big Coulee.
Have you ever heard of a "bubble pump"?
They're neat but a bit uncommon.
Basically you run small-bore pipe down inside a larger pipe.
At the top is basically a bicycle pump.
What you do is pump high pressure air down through the small bore pipe to the bottom of the full-bore pipe till fluid exits at first & wait a few seconds then pump again, one stroke at a time.
If you have a check valve at the surface you don't need the initial pressurization.
The "pulsed" bubbles exit under pressure matching the head pressure & expand as they rise, lifting the water column with them. You can aslo use an air compressor using short "puffs" if you have one.
The advantage is the pause between pumps so the operator can pump longer, because its less tiring & the mechanics are all at the surface.
Its also depth independent up to the level of the air pumps pressure ability.
plonker ---- No I haven't heard of the term "bubble pump" but I know the principal very well. That would be a good idea for lifting a column of water if the depth isn't too much. I do have an electric compressor that could be used instead of a bicycle pump and could be run using a generator. In emergency situations that is a good idea.
The same principal has been used in the petroleum industry called "gas lift production".
 

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I'm not sure of the depth limit but I've seen SCUBA divers using it in 120' of sea water with no problems.
The trick is intermittent air pulsed, each bubble is only lifting the column between bubbles regardless of depth. The gas expansion (2X per 33 or 34') helps too.
If i used a compressor I'd use a small intermediate cylindrical to control bubble size.If you've seen the movie of "For Your Eyes Only", the Greek archaeologist "Melina Havelock", is using a very large one in the "underwater temple" scene.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
No, I don't recall seeing that movie. Sea water would exert almost 0.5 psi per foot of depth and at 120 feet would account for nearly 60 psi on a diver's body at that depth. A scuba diver would have to de-compress very slowly after being at that depth very long.
What criteria are you basing your "gas expansion" on? As hydrostatic pressure is reduced your air bubble will expand until the bubble reaches the surface where there is no more hydro. pressure above it. Are you saying the bubble will expand 2 x 33 or 66 times its initial volume at its point of injection, as it travels up the water column from its injection point to the surface ? If I understand your statement, a bubble one cubic inch in volume at injection point down hole would expand to 66 cubic inches in volume by the time it reaches the surface?
 

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Yes exactly.
But it would also depend on time.
60' for 60" is the decom limits, after that you get into decompression tables (the dreaded "Bends")
The usual formula is 1 Atm (14.7 PSI per atm. per 33' (or 34' for fresh) water.
Double or more the RNT (Retained Nitrogen) + the current Nitrogen loading, & you're into decom.
That's why Tektite 1 was at 31' BSL. You can saturate all the tissue groups & you still won't "bend".
This is based on the U.S. Navy dive table & has a 10% error factor.
For superbly fit Navy Seals.
For the purpose of a pump it means nothing, because "The Bends" is retained Nitrogen, not total pressure. But gives good well researched idea of compression per foot.
One thing they do when you're training for SCUBA is to take a blown up balloon with you it shrinks as it pressurizes to ambient. At 60' its one quarter (more or less) of its surface volume.
Then you exhale one breath into a different balloon at depth & watch as you come up.
It frequently bursts.

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