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Just wanted to know what year would my Eddystone M1917 was made. Serial no. is 267484.
Should be January, 1918.
Eddystone serial numbers and barrel dates tend to correlate pretty well, although there is some variation, since rifles were not assembled in serial number order. The army used barrel​ date as date of manufacture, for lack of anything more exact to go by. A rifle with a 1-18 barrel date was deemed manufactured that month, even though the receiver may have been made earlier.
 

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I will happily defer to Jungles, as I have no personal, in depth knowledge of the M1917. I only pass on the information that appears in Dick Culver's 2003 article, "The U.S. Rifle, caliber .30, M1917," which lists the serial number of 256,006 for February 1918 Eddystone M1917s, with the comment that "the serial number listed for each month is generally accepted as the 1st serial # for that month." He shows the serial number 174,160 for January 1918 Eddystones, and 354,351 for March 1918 Eddystones. Whether Mr. Culver's information is accurate, or whether the "generally accepted" views of 2003 have been refined with the passage of time, I have no idea. Regards, McAuslan
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The barrel date is 1-18 on my M1917. Thanks to Jungles and McAuslan for their helpful post. Seems the M1917 went to Canada then to Denmark and back to the US. It never was reworked and all parts that I can see are "E" marked except the bolt which came back with a numbered "W" bolt. It's a very good shooter.
 

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Just came across an Eddystone at a shop with a serial #1357059, but all the serial search places stop just short of the number on this rifle. Any ideas or suggestions? It's assumed to be a 30-06, but there's some question about that, too as the guy who sold it to the shop said it was .303. Haven't had a chance to look further into that.
 

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Just came across an Eddystone at a shop with a serial #1357059, but all the serial search places stop just short of the number on this rifle. Any ideas or suggestions? It's assumed to be a 30-06, but there's some question about that, too as the guy who sold it to the shop said it was .303. Haven't had a chance to look further into that.
If it is in .303, you MIGHT be looking at a Pattern 14 rifle that was built for the British. The Pattern 14 is the basic rifle that the Model 1917 was derived from.

Many people can't tell the difference between the two, but the differences ARE there.

It is easy to spot the differences, once you know what to look for.

Typically, the Pattern 14's stock will have a long range sight fitment on the left side of the forend (this might not be s decisive difference because the M1917 stocks can be reworked to fit a P14, though), and the genuine P14 stocks come in three different 'patterns, only one of which even comes close to looking like a true M1917 stock (the finger grooves are STILL not right, though).

The P14 differs in a few other details from the M1917.

A major difference to note is that the P14 has longer rear sight protection 'ears' and the rear sight ladder is also a bit longer on the Pattern 14 (by about a half-inch each). These features were shortened on the M1917 to make room in the receiver for the magazine to accept the longer.30-06 cartridge.

The magazine opening on a P14 is a bit too short to accept a .30-06 round, and the .303 clip slot is too wide to 'catch' a .30-06 Charger.

The bolt differs in that the P14 bolt has a totally flat bolt face (there is a 'ridge' on the face of the M1917 bolt) and the front end of the P14 extractor differs from the 'standard' Mauser-style extractor by having a 'hook' on the end that closely resembles the extractor profile of Lee-Enfield (and No.4) Rifle. The M1917 extractor has a completely Mauser-style end.

For [people unfamiliar with either type of rifle (P14 or M1917), the easiest way to tell the difference at a glance is to see if the slot for the ejector extends forward of the front end of the bolt release

The P14 ejector is longer than the one on the M1917, thus it needs a longer slot. On the M1917, you can not see the ejector slot because the bolt release completely covers it. If you see a slot, it is a P14.
 

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1917

Like a dope, I should have taken some pictures, but as I recall the barrel stamp is indicated a Eddystone 1917. Condition is decent, but not outstanding all part stamping I saw were "E", looked like an original rifle that had not been re-arsenaled or bubba-ed . He's at $750 (asking price) and I already have one Eddystone that's in better shape. My grandfather apparently worked at the Eddystone plant during WWI. Thanks





If it is in .303, you MIGHT be looking at a Pattern 14 rifle that was built for the British. The Pattern 14 is the basic rifle that the Model 1917 was derived from.

Many people can't tell the difference between the two, but the differences ARE there.

It is easy to spot the differences, once you know what to look for.

Typically, the Pattern 14's stock will have a long range sight fitment on the left side of the forend (this might not be s decisive difference because the M1917 stocks can be reworked to fit a P14, though), and the genuine P14 stocks come in three different 'patterns, only one of which even comes close to looking like a true M1917 stock (the finger grooves are STILL not right, though).

The P14 differs in a few other details from the M1917.

A major difference to note is that the P14 has longer rear sight protection 'ears' and the rear sight ladder is also a bit longer on the Pattern 14 (by about a half-inch each). These features were shortened on the M1917 to make room in the receiver for the magazine to accept the longer.30-06 cartridge.

The magazine opening on a P14 is a bit too short to accept a .30-06 round, and the .303 clip slot is too wide to 'catch' a .30-06 Charger.

The bolt differs in that the P14 bolt has a totally flat bolt face (there is a 'ridge' on the face of the M1917 bolt) and the front end of the P14 extractor differs from the 'standard' Mauser-style extractor by having a 'hook' on the end that closely resembles the extractor profile of Lee-Enfield (and No.4) Rifle. The M1917 extractor has a completely Mauser-style end.

For [people unfamiliar with either type of rifle (P14 or M1917), the easiest way to tell the difference at a glance is to see if the slot for the ejector extends forward of the front end of the bolt release

The P14 ejector is longer than the one on the M1917, thus it needs a longer slot. On the M1917, you can not see the ejector slot because the bolt release completely covers it. If you see a slot, it is a P14.
 

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For second poster.
Remember also folks, Eddy and Rem serial numbers seen lately , are beyond published numbers to use up supplies on hand as contracts were cancelled after the armistice.
However, according to Ferris . his last date is 1379169, with 12/18 barrel. You are well within the last rifles made at Eddy.
There should be no mistaking these with a P14, as the receiver will be marked "US rifle of 1917".
Not the first time a gun shop guy has been wrong!
 
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