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I am purchasing some Turk 8mm. I can't remember what years are questiionable. I know the pressures run hi, but some years are worse than others.

thx
 

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If you are talking about Turk 154 grain from the early forties. The only year that had problems is 47 loose bullets and cracked necks in some of the batches. It is a good idea to check the ammo for cracked necks and loose bullets before shooting.

The Turk is loaded to specs for a 154 grain load. It is perceived as "hot" NOT over pressure, because of the hefty recoil compared to Romo or Yugo 8mm.
Any Mauser 98 three lug action will handle the ammo well.

It chronos at 3100 in long rifles. Yugo chronos at around 2,500 fps.

There are other types of Turk ammo, depending on year of mfgr. that is HB and is different than the run of the mill early forties stuff.

To be specific, you need to post the headstamp or a picture would help ID exactly what you have.

Also depends on what type of Mauser you will be shooting it in and what type of shooting you want to do, plinking, precise target, silouhettes, etc.
 

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41 to 49 seems to be junk but it all works well in my mauser. They never missfire on me. These dont work in semi auto at all, the shell is too soft, extractor rips the case.
 

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I was thinking that all Turk 8mm was good. Ive not had FTF or click-bangs. I would get all of it. The older stuff with the 198gr bullets is better than the 154gr stuff.
 

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I agree with 1 eye.

Semi autos are a different ball game and worthy of a whole new thread when it comes to shooting milsurp ammo in them.

If you can get some of the 196 grain Turk, it is exc. usually comes in blue bandos instead of the sage green. Also the brass two piece stripper clips are way better than the one piece brass clips that will chew up your thumb.

Turk is for sure not "junk".

Just be aware that 47 was the stinko year.

Also the POI will differ greatly with 8mm of different origins.

Use it in Mauser 98 actions with three lug bolts and you will have no problems.

Using it in other rifles will only serve to confuse the issue and a seperate discussion is needed if that is what you are going to do.
 

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....Just be aware that 47 was the stinko year....
I would add 46 and 49 to the list of questionable years based upon personal experiences... lots of neck splits. It doesn't bother me much because I reuse the components and recycle the brass but I seldom actually shoot those years anymore.
 

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I've had some 43 that was very good stuff.
In general early 40's is probably the way to go.
Ditto on 47, it's lame.
 

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It all sucks. Prompty send it all to me and I'll dispose of it for you!;)
 

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I've got a pile of 42 dated Turk ammo, and it is fine. Maybe a bit hot, but good clean ammunition. The stripper clips are a bit cheesy, but work well enough.
 

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One word of caution is to "shake" each round and see if you can hear the powder sliding around inside the case.
If not, the cartridge has been overfilled and the power is being compressed by the projectile.
Back in the day (when Turk was almost free) folks would knock down all of it, reduce and equalize the powder charges and then re-load it and end up with a pile of "free" powder.
Other than the ones that split the cases or were never crimped properly, the problem with Turk is that the powder was not measuered properly, if at all, so group size/s are inconsistant.
Reports are that the altered charge Turk shot very good groups, with the rear sight ramp set to 200 or 300 meters (at 100 meters).
Recoil was vastly reduced as well.
 

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Well, has all this BS confused you enough? All lots of '40s vintage ammo have some cracked necks. They did not anneal the necks until some time in the 1947 production run. Look for ammo that has geenish colored necks similar to US M2 ball cases. It will not crack and can be put away for long term storage.
 

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One word of caution is to "shake" each round and see if you can hear the powder sliding around inside the case.
If not, the cartridge has been overfilled and the power is being compressed by the projectile.
Back in the day (when Turk was almost free) folks would knock down all of it, reduce and equalize the powder charges and then re-load it and end up with a pile of "free" powder.
Other than the ones that split the cases or were never crimped properly, the problem with Turk is that the powder was not measuered properly, if at all, so group size/s are inconsistant.
Reports are that the altered charge Turk shot very good groups, with the rear sight ramp set to 200 or 300 meters (at 100 meters).
Recoil was vastly reduced as well.
I've never had any bad Turk, but I have never really paid attention to the dates except for the 1950s non-magnetic stuff. I pulled quite a bit of it to download the ammo for my son when he was younger, and never really noticed much variation within years. Between years I think I noted a grain or a grain and a half difference, but that is expected from bulk powders.
 

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1947 is the only year in which split necks ran rampant.

I bought some from an online dealer at an excellent priced based upon the fact many would have to be tossed.

I use to have it posted on here, but split necks BEFORE firing were at about 11-12% of the 1400 rounds I bought.

I sat in front of the TV, watched a god-awful movie, and with my left hand held the case, with my right hand gave the bullet a twist.

Bullets in the split necks always spun easily, and I didn't need any of them sliding into the case when I chambered a round and increasing the pressure.
 

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I had exactly one bando of the bad 1947. The other dozen or so were fine. Sounds as if many folks had bad '47 ammo, but I had only that one bad batch, so I'd recommend a careful looking over before purchase rather than a blanket rejection just because it was 1947. Do be aware it is corrosive & clean accordingly.
 

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I had exactly one bando of the bad 1947. The other dozen or so were fine. Sounds as if many folks had bad '47 ammo, but I had only that one bad batch, so I'd recommend a careful looking over before purchase rather than a blanket rejection just because it was 1947. Do be aware it is corrosive & clean accordingly.
By all means don't reject 1947, just negotiate the price so that you may get credit on split necks, as I did on my crate.

It's comparable to paying the same amount for 50's Yugo as 70's Yugo...one shouldn't.
 

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Turk 8 MM

47 Date had 70% split necks of the first 5 bandoliers I stripped. Returned ammo for 49 ammo all worked fine in all my semi's as well as my FA 1919A4 and MG 34. Bought 8 cases of 49 & 50 dated ammo no problms. I would avoid eqrly 40's dated ammo as I have sent 3 A4's have their top cover bowed due to head failures. we sectioned some off the 42,43 & 44 dated ammo as well as 49 and 50. The early dates had much thinner heads than the later dates.
FWIW
 
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