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Copper Bullet member
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I don't want to change the original finish color (the rifle is all matching) of the stock, but I would like to put some sort of oil preservative on the stock, as it was in storage a real dry part of the country.
Any suggestions?
 

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A light wipe of Howards F&W.
 

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a light wipe of Howards won't do anything to it but clean the dust out the grain and lightly seal it with beeswax. Ballistol will darken it and attract dirt. I believe Ballistol is a reason for extremely dark K98k stocks. Ballistol is great stuff, I use it exclusively now on all my firearms. If it gets on wood or leather, no biggie, but I don't wipe it on intentionally. As Archie said, BEST thing is to do nothing if you don't have to. But I've put a light Howards wipe on some unissued untouched rifle stocks, LIGHT wipe, and it didn't darken or change them. Just go easy. More isn't better, and nothing is best. More nice original rifles have been messed up by "conservation" efforts than being left alone.
 

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More isn't better, and nothing is best. More nice original rifles have been messed up by "conservation" efforts than being left alone.
Thats all I was trying to convey..

I would take a dry stock over a "saved" stock anyday.

I use Howards on sub-$500 guns but thats just me..



...
 

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Turpentine lensed 1 to 1 1/2 mix-- dip tip of a wool rag in mixture teaspoon amount at a time to area as small as a dollar bill, rub on off just to fill poise cells and stop the cellular dryness and breaking down of the surface.
look at it all over and decide if you want to do it again. but do a test area first under the wood. mix solution as not to darken give or take a little in aether direction. then wax with a bees wax cut again with turpentine, decide if less or more wax is needed the second rubbing.
take old blue jeans legs and all over in a shoe shining motion to cut surface back leaving leaving pores still filled.but surface completely wiped off. :thumbsup:
but not stopping the dryness is paramount to letting the gun deteriorate into a weaker brittle surface that easily damaged by scrapes, rags in cleaning, pulling splinters loose.:(
after a gun left the factory soldiers used boot black, waxes, cleaners, kerosene, oils what ever was at hand or nothing at all. :thumbsup:
but it ant original after issue no matter what was used or not used to keep the wood stable.
life of the gun is the responsibility of all citizen soldiers at least till he next collectors does his part.
as is isn't caring for it its being affair of changing the value. but drying out changes the value eminently
ps have had two o3a3's with dry stocks new unfired conditions sold in the $800 range to perferional collectors. and told about wiping down stocks this way. one later 3 months sold for .$975 the best ones i ever had.
;<><DJ
 

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Thats all I was trying to convey..

I would take a dry stock over a "saved" stock anyday.

I use Howards on sub-$500 guns but thats just me..



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I hear you. I've used it on $3,000+ rifles, particularly an untouched literally mint
M1903A1 NM papered rifle with a flawless, but very dry beauty of a walnut stock. You can't tell I did anything other than the stock is mint and still shows an "untreated" look, but actually is much better looking and better than it was. The purpose is to get the accumulated unoriginal dust and grime out of the grain and lightly protect it from further intrusion. One doesn't slather the stuff on. I would use nothing else. A light coat with a white towel wipe will look a little shiny and wet at first, but this is gone soon, taking with it unoriginal dust, grease, and grime that are not good for wood.

That said, you can't "feed" wood and really can't do much to it other than remove bad things from the grain and lightly seal the grain from intrusion of bad things again, and protect the wood from oxidation, which all things do. A stock, particularly in a humidified safe, can dry and crack, which is not good.
 

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Not cringe, I'd like it. ;) If it's a laminate that stuff holds up better than solid wood, unless it delaminates, which nothing is going to prevent except perfect storage.
 

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What about Birchwood-Casey "Tru-Oil"?
Anyone have any experience with this?
(Our gunsmith here at the shop says he uses that, but I wanted to ask the 98k "experts"...)
I have used the Tru-Oil on new black powder kits. It is a finish. Do NOT do it. It will add a new finish, not help the old.

I agree with Hambone on the Howards Feed and Wax. I have used it for quite some time. Got mine at Home Depot.
 

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Two choices:

1. Leave it alone(most original).
2. Apply a finish and ruin the originality.

Applying anything like tru-oil, danish whatever, real tung oil, formbys or anything else is altering the original finish that you cannot reverse. That degrades the value of the rifle. With that said, howards feed n wax is not noticable if you choose to listen to hambone. The only way to bring the moisture content back up to par is to place the stock in an enviroment that has a little higher humidity for a long period of time. Wood will take on moisture of the surrounding air. If you do this, remove the action from the stock and put it away somewhere until the you feel the stock is ready. Never put water directly on the stock though.

Has anyone ever seen the timber that comes out of an old northern farm house? It is bone dry. This comes from years of not using humidifiers in the winters.
 

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Two choices:

1. Leave it alone(most original).
2. Apply a finish and ruin the originality.

Applying anything like tru-oil, danish whatever, real tung oil, formbys or anything else is altering the original finish that you cannot reverse. That degrades the value of the rifle. With that said, howards feed n wax is not noticable if you choose to listen to hambone. The only way to bring the moisture content back up to par is to place the stock in an enviroment that has a little higher humidity for a long period of time. Wood will take on moisture of the surrounding air. If you do this, remove the action from the stock and put it away somewhere until the you feel the stock is ready. Never put water directly on the stock though.

Has anyone ever seen the timber that comes out of an old northern farm house? It is bone dry. This comes from years of not using humidifiers in the winters.
I have never used Howard's but I have respect for several of those who propound its benefits. With that said, I approve of what Award posted. Exactly my thoughts on the subject! :thumbsup:
 

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Sorry I was just being facetious about using tru oil and poly. Danish Oil would be okay on a repro stock that has no collectors value but never on an original stock. I was surprised no one called me on it. This is a very civil board, (at times).
 

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I use boiled linseed oil that you can buy at Lowe's or Home Depot. If you need to clean varnish off of an old stock, I use denatured alcohol. Let the stock dry for about a day and then linseed oil it for about 4 to 5 coats. It will not leave a shine like tru oil does and it preserves the wood. The linseed oil doesn't harm the metal on the gun when it comes into contact with it either. I've done several K98's like this and they look great.
 
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