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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A guy on the local classifieds has this for sale at a high price but I perused the pictures only to realize I have no idea what I'm looking at. Usually I can recognize a receiver or something but I'm dumbfounded on this one. He's selling it for a family member it sounds like and some collector told him it was a "1910 Mauser from world war 1 and would be more valuable if it had the original scope". I'm sure he got good advice and is just remembering it wrong, but here's for you folks to help me scratch the itch to ID this thing. Features include:
-Ross-esque cerrated locking lugs
-stripper clip guide but no thumb cut out
-double trigger
-weird safety that made me turn away from my 1903 idea but looks familiar
-No mfg markings
-Unique hinged floorplate
-Some kind of raised platform for the front scope mount
-arisaka-esque 2-piece metal reinforcing in the tang

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Index mark for rebarreling, safety conversion for scope, are there any other stampings than the 257. I am wondering if it is a conversion to 257 Roberts. Certain mauser cartridge bases were compatible with the specifications for the .257 Roberts. My first thought was "guild rifle" but I have no idea other than I will be interested to read the solution. The Roberts is a very common conversion for the 1895 Chilean mausers but that is not the issue here. The "hatcher hole" looking thingy makes me thing Spanish mauser.
 

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From the pictures I would say it is a butchered Newton 1916.

For more information

 

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Yep, it's a newton. Definitely been rebarreled though. Thanks Fal Grunt! Any idea what she'd be worth?
This is a very difficult thing to ascertain. There were not many made, there are not many remaining, and they do not often come up for sale. I do not track them for prices, so I cannot really offer any realistic numbers.

As someone who is very interested in systems and designs, I would think $400-$500 would be a reasonable price. It's "collectability" has been ruined and I do not see the remaining untouched parts being worth much more than that.
 

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Clearly a non-military Mauser which does not belong on "The Military Mauser Forum".
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
No worries. Feel free to remove it Geladen if you can or know a moderator. I’ve found out what I needed to know and am sorry if it was the wrong place. I posted here because the seller told me it was a WW1 bring back so I figured it was some kind of sportered experimental rifle.
 

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The Newton actions are great samples, how to improve Mauser actions - by means of the 'comb' locking lugs (already known from the Ross MK3), better ergonomics, a handy safety - several things which Military Mausers were obviously missing...

The Newton actions are well described in S. Otteson's book 'The Bolt Action Rifle Vol.II'. Here the book's summary for the 'Buffalo Newton' shown here:

"Buffalo Newton
Summary
For pure design ingenuity, the Buffalo Newton rifle is practically
without peer. Had everything worked the way it was supposed to,
and had the action been better looking, it might have “led the van of
bolt actions rifles,” as Newton would put it. But they didn’t, and it
wasn’t. It was, in fact, as homely as the Original Model was
graceful. Part of the sacrifice in appearance was accounted for by
the use of manufacturing short cuts and a rougher finish. But the
design itself was also responsible, and one must wonder how the
same person could have laid out both rifles.
Newton’s lack of technical perspective was a serious handicap.
Like other unsuccessful gun designers, he seems to have been too
intent on incorporating his various novel design ideas, each perhaps
meritorious in itself, to carefully weigh their effect on the overall
rifle. Also he simply failed to carry through on many of his
intentions. For example, in introducing the Original Model rifle he
pledged to acquire the “thousands of dollars worth of jigs and
gauges” that would ensure the rifle was “built strictly on the interchangeable
part system.” Yet a few years later in describing his
Buffalo rifle, he again stated that “all parts are strictly interchangeable,”
while in the same breath admitting that “the old Newton was
not strictly interchangeable.” In fact neither rifle would win any
awards for uniformity of manufacture or inspection.
Add to such technical shortcomings the constant shortage of
finances, and the fact that the rifle got even less press coverage than
Newton’s Original Model, and you had the perfect ingredients for
another dismal commercial failure.
The following summarizes the strong and weak points of the
Buffalo Newton action:

Strong points:
1. Strong operating cams (cammed versions)
2. Strong locking system.
3. Non-rotary extractor.
4. Excellent bolt guiding.
5. Positive and controlled ejector.
6. Rigid receiver.
7. Effective cocking system.
8. Strong recoil lug arrangement.
9. Stable magazine spring.

Weak points:
1 . Poor ignition system.
2. Inconvenient bolt stop release.
3. Springfield-like breeching system.
4. Uncertain retention of firing pin assembly.
5. Homely and awkward-looking lines.
6. Poor unset trigger performance.
7. Non-locked receiver stud.
8. Ineffective bolt-sleeve indexing system.
9. Inconvenient floorplate catch.
10. Inability to empty the magazine from underneath. "

hope this is helpful, Chris
 

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Boy was I all wet. That is really interesting information though.
 
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