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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend recently inherited this rifle and I'm at a loss to tell him what he has.
It appears to be a German Mauser, non-military, sporting rifle with a low serial number. The crowns imprinted on the receiver also confuse me. Anyone familiar with this model?




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It’s actually a Mauser type S stutzen, made in 1913. Pretty desirable rifle in original configuration which it appears to be. Those are simply the commercial German proofs of the era on the receiver.
 

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there has been no mention of the rifles' calibers, so far. the "s" comment is about the OPs rifle being a Mauser commercial model, type S, which is probably meant to describe a rifle in the European style named"stutzens". a stutzen is a carbine with a short barrel and a full-length stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

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8.0, "N", designates 8mm Normal, which i believe means it is of the earlier, smaller, bore size. someone well informed will comment to verify or correct me. if you would care to post more and better pics of the rifle, you will receive more comments and info.
 

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It means normalisiert, I believe the throats of the chambers on N marked guns are opened up larger than the previous M/88 cartridge.
 

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I'm curious, does your rifle also have the letter "N" following the "8.0" caliber designation imprinted on the left side of the barrel, alongside the receiver?
If so, what does the "N" mean - I would have expected the letters "MM". Thanks!
Mine has no caliber designation on the side of the barrel

3818111




The caliber designation is instead on the bottom of the barrel.

If memory serves, all of the following nomenclature means 8X60 J.

3818115
 

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hi, kid. if the throat was opened up, then that was probably done so that the new ammo with .323 bullets, could be used??. please comment more about this
Hey Frosty, yes indeed that is my understanding, with the throat itself leading to the most dramatic amount of pressure issues. It seems Oberndorf manufactured their chambers with the throat at this larger diameter within this timeframe to mitigate any issues with shooting .323 ammunition. I’ve read this many times before but can’t remember a specific source other than I am fairy certain Axel details it.

Not to get off topic, but one other similar type marking that I have yet to find a solid meaning for is the S marking on the side of JP Sauer receivers. It appears on guns like my .318 bored rifle, as well as .30-06 and other cartridges, so it is not related to the typical 8mm attribution that we are used to. I presume it is probably a relation to the bullet types a rifle might accept, but what about them and why; many of the old round nose bullets probably having a similar if not longer OAL. Any thoughts on that?
 

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Thanks to all who responded, you guys know the Mauser.
You've helped a great deal and we appreciate it
It appears mildly modified, missing the rear set trigger, and the swivels have been modified for modern QD attachment it appears. Still appears to be a nice example with only minor issues, a nice rifle to inherit for sure!
 

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Just quick, belated incursion! You all - gathering of Oberndorf Mauser sporter experts - appear to have the "unknown Mauser" well nailed. Type S & as I recall Frosty, you have a super example! Noting also the trigger situation. Hadn't noted the sling swivels. All said, from available pix, also a very nice. Considering the exemplar rifle here was early 1914 mfg, the apparent state of originality seems much better than typical. A quick pix of my Model "M" of closest SN.
Congrats to the owner!
Best!
John
 

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Beautiful examples all around, a Type S or M is on the list for one of these days, I just love stutzens. The early full stock Type G’s are beautiful as well.
 

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Hey Frosty, the Type G is a rifle with a barrel length between the short Type M&S, and the long Type L guns. With the exception of guns offered in the two kurz calibers, the barrels on Type G rifles are 600mm as opposed to the 500mm Type M&S barrels. They aren’t too common at all, I’ve only had the chance to hold one example.
 
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