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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it just my bad luck, or are the long rifles pretty uncommon? I (personally speaking, of course) almost never see a long m95 for sale in any condition. I see a fair number of the myriad of Dutch m95 carbines floating around, did most of the long rifles get chopped before WWII?

Also, what happened to all the Dutch Mannlicher bayonets that they are so pricey? Did most of them get scrapped for some reason?
 

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You've got to remember that the Dutch army and Navy as well as the KNIL were relatively small forces whether in Europe or the colonies. There just weren't that many to begin with. The long rifles suffered a lot of attrition from use.
 

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You've got to remember that the Dutch army and Navy as well as the KNIL were relatively small forces whether in Europe or the colonies. There just weren't that many to begin with. The long rifles suffered a lot of attrition from use.
Hi dominic,
I don't know where you are looking, but in my experience, there is no shortage of Dutch long rifles on the market. I've found a dozen or so in the last ten years. In anticipation of being drawn into WW I, the Dutch Government over-produced long 95's during WW I, and as a result had a half million long rifles in storage at the beginning of WW II. In addition, Dutch Army small arms were supported by a good maintenance and refurshment program. Because the Netherlands did not participate in WW I and was quickly overwhelmed by the Wehrmacht blitzkrieg in WW II, few long rifles experienced prolonged combat and many are found today in exceptional condition. Since condition sells, my experience is that long rifles get bought up very quickly, while the ubiqitous carbines, (which often have issues - mismatched, missing handguards, missing parts etc) stay on the market a long time. If you are prepared to pay market price for a long rifle, they can be found easily. Call dealers and speak to them. Send Dennis Kroh an email with your want list, etc. Also, there are maybe a dozen or more variations of these, so learn about them so you can make an informed decision when you find one.

I would also add that they last one I bought, a rare "LW" version, had been deactivated and plugged in the 1970's, and was about to be made into a lamp. I still had to pay $200 for it.

Also, in my experience, they do not turn up at gunshows.
Good Luck with your search.
Regards,
John
 

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I got the only one I've ever seen at a gunshow for a C note. Seller had 2 tables of knives and a Steyr duffle cut M-95. It's missing the sight screw& lower band. He sold it for what he had in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I saw that, I guess I should have also prefaced "around here". I run into all sorts of oddities and rarities, but the m95 Long (which I guess is not actually that rare) never.

Of the m95 Long types, which is probably the most uncommon? The Naval one seems like it should be rare and the KNIL does too.

Still, how about the bayonets? If they overproduced the long rifles, you'd think they'd have made the bayonets to go along with them.
 

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Hi Dominic,
The rarest rifles are the KSO small bore trainers, then the Dutch Navy (Marine Corps) rifles, then the Army and finally KNIL.

The bayonets are out there too, Realize however that bayonets are collected worldwide and can be shipped easily across borders. Unlike rifles, few countries control the ownership of bayonets.
Regards,
John
 

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A lot of them made their way to Dutch Indoneisa, where they were chopped, dropped, and converted to .303 British. And in a third world country they rusted and rotted away rifles and bayonets all.
 

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Hello Gents,

There is also evidence to suggest that during WWI either through clandestine channels or from Steyr that some percentage of Dutch M95 long infantry rifles ended up being used by both the German Army and Russian Imperial Army during WWI.

I think the jury is still out on how these rifles both ended up on opposite sides of the Eastern Front, however some of the could have been Steyr over-runs?

Any interest topic. I too have a long rifle in the original 6.5 cambering as well as a beautifully preserved .303 conversion.

I'll post photos if I can find them?

Warmest regards,

John
 
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