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First the Х.О.Д.К.А. mark. Nick is correct, no one knows what it means. These revolvers are known and I have pictures of several other examples, but I've never before seen one that wasn't a refurb. The parts on this one are all Imperial or very early Soviet - the hammer OTK marks. The trigger guard is post 1916 (no serial number). The grips look "funny" are they made of walnut or oak?
I have some suspicions about these but am not will to put them in print yet.

BTW production of the single action was terminated in 1922. Single action parts have been observed on target revolvers from the 1924-1936 period, but most have earlier Imperial parts. The are exceptions to that as well and star marked, post 1928, single action parts are known.

As to the ГОМЗ revolver, check out the sticky on the sideplate markings 1941-1945. A significant part of ГОМЗ was evacuated from Leningrad to Kazan in 1941 and the revolvers were made there, not in Leningrad. I suspect that the Kazan factory is where the tooling from Tula went, not Izhevsk.
http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?178984-Nagant-side-plate-markings-1941-to-1945
Joe
 

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The frame is definitely Tula, the marks on the inside are correct. However, it has been resurfaced (ground down), and you can seen the remains of the original serial number and the right side OTK in the pictures.
The parts are 1916-1922 and the frame is definitely pre 1928 (the loading gate alignment tooth is present).
The barrel and front sight are replacement - post 1932. Does it have the 'V' or 'U' shaped rear sight groove?
The side plate is obviously a replacement and would likely indicate that an existing revolver was resurfaced and the new side plate with the experimental shop mark was added when it was put together for testing something. And yes, it does mean experimental shop - Эксперимент м-кая = experimental workshop is obvious and as I believe that Nick is a native speaker, I would agree with him.

These are not common, but there are more than 2 or three of them out there. As I said before, this is the first example I have seen that wasn't a refurb and has more or less period components which is marvelous information.
I would definitely like to examine better, more detailed pictures.

As to SfcRet's remarks; the original Russian contract (1896-98) to Russia of 20,000 revolvers was single action only and officers were expected to buy the commercial version which was "triple action" (both double and single action) from the Officer's supply stores.
Production started at Tula in 1898 and both versions were produced, but by far the majority of the early production was single action. Estimates of double action production run in the 15-20% range. Production of the single action only was terminated with the orders of 1922. All Standard Service revolvers produced after that were supposed to be "triple action".

The rest is irrelevent because no one is sure what the other acronym is. Russian and Soviet acronyms are often (read that as almost always) confusing and many times the meanings have been lost, they were obvious at the time but the times have changed.

I do agree that often direct translation of words from one language to another is dangerous at best.
Joe
 
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