Gunboards Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have an M91/30 that has a beautiful stock, except for an ugly stripe that runs horizontally across the hand guard on one side. The stripe is a spot where the original coating has apparently worn off .

Does anyone have any suggestions on how to improve the appearance of these worn areas, without resorting to refinishing of the entire rifle? I’ve included a snapshot of the problem area.

LD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
683 Posts
Hehehe, oops, I did that to my mosin (HEY, my 1st time stripping it down, the barrel band scraped it off). I wonder if the same thing happened to yours?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
A guy could possibly just refinnish the handguard. I don't know af any simple fix. Someone more knowledgable will probably chime in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
683 Posts
That's your cue.......... :) Anyone? Anyone?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
683 Posts
My mosin feels naked.... :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
On some of my Mosins, the barrel bands are a bit on the tight side, even after moving them off of the barrel spring, but in this particular case, I recall the band was not so tight, and I don't recall scraping any finish off.

However, it's possible that someone else may have done something like that prior to my purchase. It sure looks like a strong possibility. If I remember correctly, I think that I do recall seeing that stripe already present while I was looking it over prior to my purchase. The rifle was still in overall great shape so I bought it anyway.

LD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
I seem to remember on the old format at one time there was some threads on refinnishing mosins. Hopefully someone with a better memory than mine will chime in and let you know what was used. Maybe it is possible to try and touch it up without resorting to stripping and refinnishing.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
11,316 Posts
You could buy some matching shellac and carefully cover the scrapes. That seems to be the most obvious and easy fix.
 

·
Platinum Bullet member
Joined
·
20,289 Posts
On your handguard you've got enough thickly slopped on refurb quality shellac to dissolve and redo an entire rifle. Brush or wipe on enough fresh denatured alcohol to dissolve some of the existing shellac, and migrate it to the scraped spot. It may take several applications to do it, since denatured alcohol will dissolve some shellac, make it tacky, then rapidly evaporate to leave an uneven or streaked appearance before you can complete the task in one session. It's not difficult to do if you're patient. The results will be a handguard covered with a thinner, but original (refurb) coat of shellac.

Nice thing about shellac is that if you don't like the way your work turns out, you can either brush on more shellac, or in extreme cases just denatured alcohol, and redo portions of your wood - it all blends in easily and nicely, and if there are a few small streaks, imperfections or even fingerprints, they will look original. After all, you're not refinishing a mirror smooth piano, but an arsenal rifle refurbed by a likely drunken Russian in a make-work program.:D Quality was never a primary consideration, only numbers done.

If you go into convulsions and manage to somehow strip off all of the original finish, you can always mix up a heavy cut of either garnet or ruby flake shellac, slop it on as per the original appearance, and move on.

Keep in mind, too that, although an application of shellac surface dries to the touch within minutes, but you need to let it cure for 4-5 hours between applications. This will keep too much applied shellac from dissolving and giving an uneven appearance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,533 Posts
On your handguard you've got enough thickly slopped on refurb quality shellac to dissolve and redo an entire rifle. Brush or wipe on enough fresh denatured alcohol to dissolve some of the existing shellac, and migrate it to the scraped spot. It may take several applications to do it, since denatured alcohol will dissolve some shellac, make it tacky, then rapidly evaporate to leave an uneven or streaked appearance before you can complete the task in one session. It's not difficult to do if you're patient. The results will be a handguard covered with a thinner, but original (refurb) coat of shellac.

Nice thing about shellac is that if you don't like the way your work turns out, you can either brush on more shellac, or in extreme cases just denatured alcohol, and redo portions of your wood - it all blends in easily and nicely, and if there are a few small streaks, imperfections or even fingerprints, they will look original. After all, you're not refinishing a mirror smooth piano, but an arsenal rifle refurbed by a likely drunken Russian in a make-work program.:D Quality was never a primary consideration, only numbers done.

If you go into convulsions and manage to somehow strip off all of the original finish, you can always mix up a heavy cut of either garnet or ruby flake shellac, slop it on as per the original appearance, and move on.

Keep in mind, too that, although an application of shellac surface dries to the touch within minutes, but you need to let it cure for 4-5 hours between applications. This will keep too much applied shellac from dissolving and giving an uneven appearance.
What he said! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,628 Posts
I also used the denatured alcohol method to repair my handguard.
 

·
Copper Bullet member
Joined
·
1,736 Posts
Listen to AZshooter. I tend to ramble on refinishing threads, but what he said will suffice. :) He's right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
683 Posts
That helps a lot, thanks! Another kind of ot question about the handguards, mine has two black lines near the front sling slot on the right side. They are a little wider than a barrel band. Anyone know what they are?
 

·
Silver Bullet member
Joined
·
870 Posts
I tried the Denate method..... It did not work for me. I ended up just blending with a little deglosser, and cleaning with hoppes #9. The Denatured Alchy turned the shellac white :( I gave up, it ads character, and it doesent effect accuracy.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
1,533 Posts
If you have problems with the DA alone, you can mix up some garnet shellac from flakes, and apply a very light coat or two to blend with the existing shellac.

I bought my garnet shellac flakes from woodworkers.com. This shade of shellac is widely recommended as a close match to the reddish shellac we find on refurbed mosins.


T
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top