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Arisaka fan
Gunboards Super Premium Member

USA
395 Posts

Posted - 07/02/2006 : 7:55:40 PM Show Profile Send Arisaka fan a Private Message Reply with Quote
What got you into collecting Enfields? I wanted one since I was 10 and first saw the 2 movies the Immortal SGT and Battalion shortly after my Dad brought a Jungle Carbine From my uncle then he got a number 4 are collection grew but he got sick and we sold the first collection I did not get another Enfield after his death when I got a my Fire arms Id Card the first rifle I brought myself was a No4mkII witch I still have it needs a new Magazine I now have 5 enfields everytime I shoot them it is a trip down memory lane of me and my Father. I must say to me the enfield just has an eligance to them I can not find in other rifles I only wish they were not so much money around here

Coogan
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

USA
2532 Posts

Posted - 07/02/2006 : 8:58:07 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Dude (when can I start using "mate"?), you need to use punctuation! Reading your post is like having ADD.

Anyway, I got into Enfields when I saw my first SMLE. Thought the bayonet boss was the muzzle, from the profile of course.
Semper Fi,
Mike
Sergeant, USMCR 2111
1997-2004

Looking for:
Australian Enfields (produced or marked)
Slovak marked vz.24
Persian 98/29 Mauser
Remington Mosin rifles or Mosin rifles built on Remington receivers
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Fightin Scot
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

USA
4002 Posts

Posted - 07/02/2006 : 9:51:15 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I got into Enfield simply because I wanted one of every major milsurp out there. I now have 2 Enfields, a No1 Mk3 and a No4 Mk1, but I am always looking for nice examples to add.
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Clyde from Carolina
Gunboards.Com Silver Star Member

USA
857 Posts

Posted - 07/02/2006 : 10:02:34 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I guess it started as a kid, being interested in history. My Dad got a couple of WWII encyclopedias in the mail as a trial offer and I read them cover to cover. That whetted my appetite for old small arms.

I also remember reading Garry James' articles in Guns & Ammo about Brit weapons and Enfields in particular. Guess that really set the hook.
Clyde from Carolina
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Edward Horton
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

USA
1906 Posts

Posted - 07/02/2006 : 10:15:44 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote

quote:Originally posted by Arisaka fan

What got you into collecting Enfields? I wanted one since I was 10 and first saw the 2 movies the Immortal SGT and Battalion shortly after my Dad brought a Jungle Carbine From my uncle then he got a number 4 are collection grew but he got sick and we sold the first collection I did not get another Enfield after his death when I got a my Fire arms Id Card the first rifle I brought myself was a No4mkII witch I still have it needs a new Magazine I now have 5 enfields everytime I shoot them it is a trip down memory lane of me and my Father. I must say to me the enfield just has an eligance to them I can not find in other rifles I only wish they were not so much money around here







bigedp51
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03man
Moderator

USA
3839 Posts

Posted - 07/02/2006 : 10:39:52 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Seeing a mail order ad about 1960, for No.1 MkIII rifles for $9.95. Finally talked my Dad into ordering it for me; still have it too.
03man
Edited by - 03man on 07/02/2006 10:40:27 PM
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Ray
Gunboards Super Premium Member

New Zealand
257 Posts

Posted - 07/02/2006 : 11:18:19 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I blame john Sukey
I did my initial military training with SMLEs, my early deer shooting with a cut down one and quie frankly had no real interest in these old fashioned killing machines
In my later days I bought a GP Martini in 12 gauge and went on the internet to find out more about them
There was a martini site (Guns & Knives)but next to it was the L-E site (poor fools I used to think) but thanks to J S I got hooked and one thing and another lead to my quite extensive collection
Ray
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coop
Gunboards Super Premium Member

Australia
393 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 12:25:35 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
HI back in the late sixies, when public High Schools had Cadets, the first rifle we got to use was a no2 mkiv trainer then no1 mk111 and the Bren Gun when we where at camp at Singleton Army Base.
After parade at school you would bring your rifle home with you but without the bolt, walking through shopping centre back in those days no one looked twice at you,and just a few years ago i have started to collect them i wish i done this early when they where a lot cheaper,what great rifle and a great hobby
COOP
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FootDoc
Gunboards Super Premium Member

USA
374 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 12:51:10 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Watching my son played the video game Call of Duty 2... I stood behind him for about ten minutes, watching him take down Nazis with the Enfield 4MK1. After a while, he turned around and said, "It is a nice rifle, Dad. You should get one for your collection." I had an all mosin collection, then.

Added a couple of Enfields soon after that.
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SFW516
Gunboards Premium Member

USA
236 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 01:40:59 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
After many years of being interested in military history I decided I wanted an M1 Garand rifle, my brother suggested that I get an Enfield and the more research I did the more I liked em. I never did get around to the M1 though I guess its way too much money to spend on one gun.
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richardwv
MH Forum Moderator

USA
1832 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 02:35:36 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
A little over Forty years ago my father's No.5 was the first high powered rifle I had ever shot. After picking my butt off the ground I was hooked. Also it didn't hurt that they were just about the best condition and least expensive MILSUP around at the time....at least in my neck of the woods. My first two had to be unissued and only $19.50 from S.Kline, at a time that their Garands were selling for $99.99 (something that I didn't add to my collection until the 1990s).

Rich in WV…..savoring life one cartridge at a time!
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Dr. Johnny Fever
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

USA
2065 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 03:15:39 AM Show Profile Visit Dr. Johnny Fever's Homepage Reply with Quote
The history of the British Empire is what drew me to Enfields, whether they were actually there at the time/place/battle or not.

Rourke's Drift, Gundamuck, the Boxer Rebellion, the Somme, et al. I guess I assign a kind of romantic quality to the battles fought for the Crown, some might say wrongly so, but whatever. Enfields are way for me to go back in time, if only for 100 rounds or so...

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"As a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, Dr. Ron Paul tirelessly works for limited constitutional government, low taxes, free markets, and a return to sound monetary policies. Dr. Paul never votes for legislation unless the proposed measure is expressly authorized by the Constitution." Ron Paul for President - 2008!
Edited by - Dr. Johnny Fever on 07/03/2006 03:17:49 AM
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Lithyaddict
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

Australia
1130 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 04:24:21 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
The day that I got into Enfields was the day when our Prime Minister decided that everything else of Australian Military origins in the safe was too dangerous for a bloke like me to possess, unless it was converted into an expensive paperweight.

Twenty years of service and a Warrant count for nought in Oz. Bastards!

I suppose I should be thankful that they paid for them. Bastards!

Sorry, gripe over, please return to happier thoughts.

Edited for punctuation
"Was your court at the trial of Visser constituted like this and did you observe paragraph---- of section--- of the King's Regulations?"

"Was it like this? No, it wasn't quite so handsome. As to rules and sections, we had no Red Book and we we knew nothing of such. We were fighting Boers, not sitting comfortably behind barbed wire entanglements; we got them and shot them under Rule .303"
Edited by - Lithyaddict on 07/03/2006 04:26:29 AM
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pugs1970
Gunboards Super Premium Member

Australia
461 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 05:43:46 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
My grandfather served in britain during ww2 and my nan lost 1 brother in burma to the japs and another seved in the middle east, new guinea and my dads brother was in vietnam whilst the old man served in the reserves the first guns my brothers and i used were a BSA .22 ,winchester sngl brrl 12g and a lithgow 303-25 which has and still is in the family for about 30-40 yrs . And no my uncle won't sell or give it to me(i've tried) SO the SMLE has a bit of family history.
The battalion that seved in new guinea published a book called Stand Easy after the japs surrended and near the back pages there is a pic of the grand uncle watching landing craft comming ashore whilst holding what looks like a No.1 mk3 .
cheers pugs1970
More Lee's than the wife knows about and Less than I would like.
Ther're not mine anyway, I'm just holding them for my kids and Grandkids and great grandkids

skype. pugsgav
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lonerider
Gunboards Super Premium Member

Australia
378 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 05:48:31 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
back in the early '70's i think it was,i used to go with my dad and grandfather to the rifle range at stockton. [just north of newcastle] my ol grand dad was a 303, range shooter.after the days shoot and the range was clear i used to run the mile and collect the fmj projectiles from the mound.i think i was about 10yrs...bin hooked ever since.it was only in the last couple of yrs that i got my licence and the No1 MkIII* full sporter was the first enfield i baught [a dieing mate needed a good home for it and i couldnt let him down].next came the MkIII* full wood.next ..who knows
Sean.
the only good cat,is a dead cat !!
killem all and let god sort em out!
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Beelzebub
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

4535 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 05:55:25 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I was interested in firearms from an early age. I was about 13 when my father gave me charge over his little BSA .22 bolt-action rifle. I doubt I ever fired more than 20 rounds through it, but it was kept scrupulously clean and lightly oiled.

When I started at college (age 13 – college has different meanings in other countries), I discovered that there was a compulsory school cadet scheme. This involved wearing brutally itchy woollen quasi-military uniforms that reeked of camphor in the height of summer and a lot of marching. However, we did learn a bit of bush-craft – and there was shooting. The shooting was on the Lee Enfield No 8 trainer on the 25 yard range on the school grounds and a trip to the local full-bore range where we would fire the No 4 Lee Enfield (Long Branch No 4 Mk I*s, to be specific) and the BREN GUN.

As the first time I fired a .303 approached, I received varying advice from the boys a year ahead of me. Some of them advised holding the rifle off the shoulder to allow the rifle to move before your shoulder took up the recoil: others recommended holding the rifle tight in the shoulder. Taking this conflicting advice into consideration as well as the credibility of those giving it, on the day I pulled the butt firmly into my shoulder – and no Lee Enfield has ever hurt me (that includes No 5s, for all the girly-men out there).

(Incidentally, if any of you ever get an opportunity to fire a Bren gun, do not decline it.)

I enjoyed the experience so much that, naturally, I applied for the school shooting teams. For some reason, I did not make it the first year, but qualified the next year and represented the school in national competitions for three years.

Shooting on the school range with the No 8s was fun – as well as the cool factor of walking across the school grounds from the armoury carrying at least one rifle. In the .303 team, I discovered the special atmosphere of a rifle range early in the morning. The tranquillity about to be shattered, the developing light, the smell of gun oil as the master in charge of the team opened the back of his car to unload the rifles… Ah, memories.

A few years ago, I was helping a friend doing some building. He produced a Ramset nail gun for attaching wooden framing to the steel girders. The first shot and my mouth involuntarily salivated and I could taste honey and walnut sandwiches. The Ramset is powered by a cartridge that is nothing more than a .22 blank – and when it was raining, the school .22 team would be transported across town to the veterans’ association building where they had an indoor range in the cellar. Sitting in the gloom, waiting my turn, I would eat honey and walnut sandwiches (we had a walnut tree) with the smell of .22 cartridges wafting past…

(Before anyone makes any comments about honey and walnut sandwiches, check carefully if you have ever heard of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Honey and walnut has WAY more class…)

So 99.999% of all my early shooting was on Lee Enfields. So, when some years later, a friend suggested we join a club that did military-style shooting with military rifles, did I rush out and buy a Mauser? The hell I did. I bought examples of the rifles used by British Empire and Commonwealth troops in the Boer War, WW I, WW II and Korea. Which basically boils down to the four rifles in the photo on the back cover of Skennerton’s “The Lee Enfield Story”.


You can't always get what you want
But if you try sometime you just might find
You'll get what you need.
- The Glimmer Twins
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DocAV
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

Australia
3278 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 08:14:00 AM Show Profile Visit DocAV's Homepage Reply with Quote
Along with the other "Colonials" down Under, I shouldered my first No1 MkIII* back in 1963, aged 14, and fired 10 rounds of Mark VII at 100 yards, followed by 30 rounds from a Bren mark I at 25 yards. I was then hooked on....Bren guns and other Autos....( First cadet camp and Range day, August 1963);
I graduated to Arisakas,M1 carbines and Garands by age 18, and then some more SMLEs of my own, so that now, some 43 years later, I have over 200 Lee-Enfields of all types (Mostly SMLEs, Mostly Lithgows, and the majority are Movie Guns, but I do have a small Historical collection by Model): I also have several working Brens (Thanks to JWH, these were saved for Movie Work).
I still prefer the Bren Gun...even if regular use is with Movie Blanks, although......a nod's as good as a wink to a blind Horse.

regards, Doc AV
AV Ballistics Film Ordnance Services
Brisbane.

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Fazakerley_fella
Gunboards Premium Member

United Kingdom
203 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 08:52:04 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
3 reasons. History, I'm British and History.....(yea, I know)
Fullbore!
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para
Gunboards.Com Silver Star Member

Australia
772 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 08:52:15 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I to have had the pleasure of firing a bren. In 303 and 7.62. We where still being issued the 7.62 version as an enemy weapon and also in the J up north. The L1A8 ?(correct me Doc on nomencleture)won the MG shoot at AASAM many a time. The choc's at the time didn't have or didn't bring the Mag 58 or M60 and dragged along the Bren. Used to make us reg's irate!!!
As they where withdrawn from frontline service by then (late 80's)
I LOved them old girls. My reciever body was dated Oct 43 then converted in 59 if I remeber correctly.
Had the same time travel trip when in Mortars. Whilst the in service mortar was 81mm we often used WW2 dated 3 inch ammo. Dated OCT 42. We caled them the Dave Sullivan round!!!! Try emergency rate with 3 inch ammo out the back of a carrier !!! Remember 3 inch is not bore safe.
Cheers
NED
Shoot straight you Bastards !!!
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Chargerclip
Gunboards.Com Silver Star Member

Australia
558 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 09:11:44 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
There only was one rifle to own. When I was a kid in the 1960s in London all of our dads and grandads had been in the Great War or the Second World War. They had all been issued and used Enfields. My grandad was in the Suffolk Regiment on the Somme and my dad was in REME in Burma. I had always wanted a Lee Enfield. Looked at de-acs but held off. Living in London limited my options, but now I live in Australia and my collection has grown. My first Enfield was given to me only 20 months ago. A 1944 Lithgow. It now has many "cousins" in the safes.
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geekay
Gunboards Super Premium Member

Australia
402 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 09:39:07 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
First fired one in '48 while in the Air Force cadets then from '50 as a Regimental cadet but was keen on the SMLE from '41 when I was hospitalised with an AIF bloke in North Queensland. Today I enjoy shooting my #4 Mk2 as much as I have any other 303 including Brens and Vickers. My son's #1 is fun to shoot too even though the rear sight is indistinct. If it wont get me barred from the forum I'll confess an affection for my MAS 36 too.
Shooting is FUN, winning is MORE fun but shooting IS fun. geekay
Edited by - geekay on 05/31/2007 09:02:16 AM
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Curator
Gunboards Member

USA
55 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 10:09:17 AM Show Profile Visit Curator's Homepage Reply with Quote
I got my first Enfield "fix" at 12 from Simpson-Sears in Guelph, Ontario at age 12. C$19.95 and it came with 100 rounds of ammo. '45 Longbranch probably unfired. I was hooked. Got a black & blue shoulder the first time I fired it on the farm. The disease spread and now I have 33 of them, .22 trainers, .303s, 7.62s even a couple of .577s and 577-450s. I have dedicated brass for all, bullet moulds, every kind of tool & die needed to keep them fed. There's no known cure from what I have seen.
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Edward Horton
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

USA
1906 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 10:33:39 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Prior to December of 2005 I had never held or had any interest in an Enfield, and Mil-Surp was something that I put on my pancakes in the service. I was Christmas shopping with my wife of 29 years and bored to tears. We were at a shopping mall and I told my wife I was going to go to Dunham’s Sporting Goods and look around, she was to take her time, not to hurry and meet me inside when she was done.

At the back of the Dunham’s store the entire back wall is devoted to firearms, I started looking at new rifles on the left and worked my way to the right toward the old surplus junk (my thoughts at the time). When I got down to the military surplus end the Mitchell’s Mausers caught my eye, nope my old eyes couldn’t see the back sight. The salesman suggested I try an Enfield it had a peep sight, and thoughts of the Springfield 03-A3 I had in the 70s came to mind. While holding an Enfield my wife found me and I informed her I had my Christmas present in my hands.

As a side note this Enfield forum is very informative and our Commonwealth friends are a treasure trove of information for the American “Rebels”. One person caught my eye from the first day here as being very Enfield literate, well written and speaks with years of experience. This gentleman’s name is Beelzebub, and he puts pen to paper in a very informative manor, thanks for being here Beelzebub, Illegitimum non carborundum.

Another person that that inspired me was Jason, this low life commie pinko pervert (expletive deleted) rat bastard, had the audacity to tell me to “BUY BOOKS” when I first posted here and was asking about the doohickey connected to the thingamabob. Thanks Jason, the only book I need now is Skennerton’s Enfield Bible. (Hope you choke on a bowl of grits)

Question: Coogan, how was my sentence structure and punctuation ?

P.S. To the Australian mob, the only reason I’m an American and not from Oz is because my ancestors could run faster after "borrowing" the horse.


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Coogan
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

USA
2532 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 11:39:52 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
It is acceptable. Now you must convert the English passages to Latin and vice versa.
Semper Fi,
Mike
Sergeant, USMCR 2111
1997-2004

Looking for:
Australian Enfields (produced or marked)
Slovak marked vz.24
Persian 98/29 Mauser
Remington Mosin rifles or Mosin rifles built on Remington receivers
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goo
Gunboards.Com Silver Star Member

USA
783 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 11:57:36 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
it was the old british guns.net forum...
...
upon reviewing the posts, i was flabergasted at all the ignorance, and lack of expertise, especially from vulture, sukey, geoffrey and several others...
i decided the forum could really benefit for my vast expertise,firearms wisdom and of course, humility...
i am pretty much solely responsibile for raising the level of awarness of the old timers around here, but it still takes a lot of work which is never appreciated.
the brithsh guns forum is gone, but all the neophytes here can still be thankful the old goo is still available to impart expertise, wisdom and advice in an an unassuming manner.

..
"Sheesh! i tell you people everything i know, and you still don't know nothing!"
...
http://static.flickr.com/30/64501296_c01a1e005b.jpg
ed flanagan
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303EnfieldAU
Gunboards.Com Silver Star Member

Australia
693 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 12:29:41 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I grew up watching a lot of British War Movies and reading War Picture Library comic books (I was born in New Zealand in 1981, which might explain a few things!). My dad had a Firearms Licence, and by the time I was 16 I had quite the collection of air guns and BB guns.

Anyway, a family friend ran into some marital difficulties and had to dispose of his rifle- a SMLE Mk III*, complete with bayonet. No-one else he knew had a firearms licence, and I had a bit of spare cash as a result of an after-school job, so I offered him NZD$150 for the rifle and bayonet- which, amazingly, he accepted (SMLE rifles were, and are, amazingly common in NZ).

The rifle lived on my wall for nearly 3 years (sans bolt- Dad kept that somewhere else), and when we moved to Australia in 2000, the rifle was entrusted to another family friend for safekeeping, until such time as I could return and get the rifle.

In 2002 I finally got around to getting a Queensland Firearms Licence, and after buying a .22 to use at the range, I found a Lithgow SMLE Mk III* for sale cheaply at a local gunshop, and decided to grab it as a "Substitute" .303. Of course, little did I realise (at the time) that the "DP" markings on the rifle meant "Drill Purpose"- ie, not for shooting- and the Lithgow failed spectacularly at the range one day. The gunshop, to their eternal credit, gave me another gun (A Winchester Model 94) to make up for it, but it got me thinking that it was time to learn more about Lee-Enfields so I wouldn't make the same mistakes again.

In early 2004, my now-fiancee and I went back to NZ for my Aunty's wedding- and I decided to get the paperwork sorted out to bring my Lee-Enfield back with me.

Long story short, I got it sorted out, and once I had the rifle with me in Australia I realised it was a 1918 LSA Co SMLE Mk III* (H). Of course, I took it to the range and had a great time- and I was hooked!

I haven't looked back since the first time I fed a .303 round into the breech, sighted her up, and squeezed the trigger.
"He's always off installing a puppet government when I need him!"- Dilbert, on Dogbert.
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AWO425
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

Germany
1252 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 1:02:23 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
A good friend forced me to buy a new No4Mk2.
Since than I got me some more.
Great shooters and fun to collect!!!!!!!!!

Chris
Tradition is to keep the fire alive, not to adore the ashes!
Edited by - AWO425 on 07/03/2006 1:13:09 PM
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jsim
Gunboards Member

United Kingdom
41 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 2:07:42 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Shooting a No4 (long since retired) as a 15 year old cadet on the 25yd range at RAF Ouston (long since given over to the army) while waiting my turn for a 30 min flight in a Chipmunk (long since retired).

Life was simple then, happy days indeed :)

John
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bones92
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

4200 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 2:51:06 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
$60 for a FTR'd No4 Mk1 at Roses in 1993. I got it because it was cheap and old.
Whatever happens, we have got
the Maxim gun, and they have not.
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Youngblood
Platinum Bullet Club

USA
5962 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 3:05:05 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote

quote:Originally posted by Arisaka fan

What got you into collecting Enfields? ...

Curiosity, the price and a ready source of .303Brit (the latter dried up pretty quickly but not before I had a bit of a stockpile).

I now have 10(?) Nº4s, one Nº5 and a Nº3 that will be here soon (with Volley Sights intact ).

Still looking for a representative Nº1 in VG-EXC condition for a good price.

When you are at the range or shooting
ALWAYS WEAR SAFETY GLASSES!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
** CETME and FR-8 Forum Expat **
Registered on Nov 23, 2001 12:07 pm
Total Classic Gunboards Posts: 1191
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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John Sukey
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

USA
9613 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 3:19:27 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Originally posted by Ray

I blame john Sukey
UNGRATEFUL BASTID!
Anyhow, I started with WW2 military rifles, later switched to Trapdoor Springfields (35 but now down to one)
What started the downfall was buying a 1942 BSA WM20.
Thought it would be nice to have a rifle to go with it.
Stopped counting at 200,Martini's Sniders, Enfields, a bunch of Webleys,and other british handguns, uniforms, medals, badges, etc. etc. Have one friend in the U.K. who is an Indian Wars collector, so my stuff from that period went to him and the Brit stuff came this way.
Have bought goodies from the U.,K., N.Z. Canada, and OZ.
John Denner and Milarm have benefited from my cash infusions as well as one dealer in Wales.
Bought EVERY book on the subject that I could find.
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scotte
Gunboards Premium Member

USA
226 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 4:23:27 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
For me, it started back around 1979-1980 when I was 13-14. A summer neighbor of mine, was cleaning house, and came across an old sporterized Mk1 No4. He had no use for it and my being in the right place at the right time, ended up taking possession of it. It did not work, for the cocking was very hard, and just did not seem right.

My dad knew of a gunsmith, he took it to work and gave it to him. The days came and went, and each day I asked is it fixed yet? The excitement of now owning my very first rifle was overwhelming and getting the best of me. It now allowed me bragging rights for most of my friends already has some sort of rifle. Finally, after about 3 weeks it came home. It cost about $20.00 to fix, and an additional $5.00 for a box of mil-surp ammo still on charger clips. The firing pin was bent, which needed to be fixed and a good inspecion and cleaning was in order too.

Of course my dad needed to make sure it was safe, and he set off a few of the first rounds. I remember the sound, the smell of the gunpowder, and the rise of the barrel after pulling the trigger. I could not wait any longer. Dad told me to hold tight, and be prepared for the kick. Well, I don't think anyone is really prepared for their first time in shooting a high powered rifle. I almost dropped it. But I also learned how to handle it after a few more rounds. I also learned that you do not use an oak tree as a place to lean on. Rifle, shoulder, tree, not a good sequence.

It was not until about a few years ago, that I started looking into what I actually had. I did some research, and discovered that I don't have any rare find, but it started my interest all over again. I have now started a collection, and am off to a great start. A good friend of mine is into the US military rifles, M1 Garand, M14, 1917, 1903 ect. I'm finding that just learning about the No4's and No5's is a lot of fun, and shooting them too is fun. This is a real inexpensive hobby, and am now in need of a new safe.
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Windstar
Gunboards Super Premium Member

USA
500 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 6:05:58 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
A 1942 Savage No4 Mk1* was my first milsurp 16 years ago even though I did not know that I would become a collector 16 years hence. My buddy at the gunshow said that the Enfield was a good buy, so there it was. Three more Enfields, 10 Mosins, 4 Mausers and two Carcanos later.....I only regret that I did not begin to acquire military surplus rifles earlier. They are a great collector item and a wonderful connection to history.
Edited by - Windstar on 09/26/2006 10:06:25 PM
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breakeyp
Gunboards.Com Silver Star Member

USA
691 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 7:13:57 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
In 1970 while stationed in the Panama Canal Zone I met a Pan Canal fellow who collected British and bought direct from the Weller & Duffy mail auctions. He had years of old auction catalogs and a very good collection including auto weapons as the Canal Zone was not covered by the '68 Gun Control Act. I have no idea what he could have done with the stuff as he could not import it. Well, anyway he sold me a No.2 MkIV* .22 which I shot at the Balboa Gun Club--they had an original .22 short shooting gallery with moving ducks and spinning pipes. It was $35 and I still have it. As military, I could import it. From there it was a question of what were the markings, history and manufacturing variations. I am still wondering and collecting. I bought and stored stuff that I had no idea what it was until I ran into Skennerton and his first book as Reynolds was missing alot. It is still fun to find a different something.
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skinsfan
Gunboards Super Premium Member

USA
498 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 8:35:39 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
a #4 was my very first milsurp,bought it at woolworths and woolco for 69 bucks back in 87'-it got me hooked on all things old and bolt operated,i wish i had scooped up the racks of carbines and m-1's next to it but 175 seemed like so much to pay......it still hurts!-that is one enfield i will never let go though-
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jason
Gunboards.Com Silver Star Member

USA
815 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 9:09:24 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote

quote:

Another person that that inspired me was Jason, this low life commie pinko pervert (expletive deleted) rat bastard, had the audacity to tell me to “BUY BOOKS” when I first posted here and was asking about the doohickey connected to the thingamabob. Thanks Jason, the only book I need now is Skennerton’s Enfield Bible. (Hope you choke on a bowl of grits)

Ed, I've never been called a (expletive deleted) before!!! whats that?





Edited by - jason on 09/26/2006 6:35:24 PM
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MrT
Gunboards.Com Silver Star Member

USA
678 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2006 : 11:59:48 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote


...I wanted the best sniper rifle of WW2, and so...

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
“The rifle itself has no moral stature, since it has no will of its own. Naturally, it may be used by evil men for evil purposes, but there are more good men than evil, and while the latter cannot be persuaded to the path of righteousness by propaganda, they can certainly be corrected by good men with rifles.”

-Jeff Cooper

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caerlonie
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

New Zealand
2497 Posts

Posted - 07/04/2006 : 02:02:00 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
They are part of the history of the British Commonwealth.They are very common in this country,and the first rifle I ever fired was a .303 (my fathers no1,mk111).
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Fletch
Gunboards Super Premium Member

South Africa
435 Posts

Posted - 07/04/2006 : 06:57:34 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Battle and war picture library books as well as Airfix plastic soldiers and models. Had a toy webley and luger as well. Now I have the real things !!!



Download Attachment:
100.43 KB
Who's been stiring up the natives
Edited by - Fletch on 07/04/2006 07:00:54 AM
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Tikirocker
Gunboards.Com Silver Star Member

Australia
567 Posts

Posted - 09/26/2006 : 05:40:36 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Apart from firing my first SMLE 303 at an Auatralian Army open day at age 9, I grew up in a family with a very strong military history on both sides of my family - growing up both in Australia and partially in the UK with both those families cemented my love of WW1 and WW2 history. For example, on my mothers side ( Australian side ) my Great Grandfather fought at Gallipoli and survived. His son ( my Grt Uncle ) flew Beaufighters for the RAAF under the RAF during WW2 out of England. My mothers two brothers ( my direct uncles ) were both in the RAAF during the Vietnam war stationed up at Amberley.

On my fathers side ... ( English side ) - my Grandfather fought with the Sussex Regiment ( Infantry ) in Burma; his Army trade was as a blacksmith and he served on the patrol boats out of Rangoon also. My Great Grandfather served in the British Army during WW1 and all of his sons served in theatres of war during WW2. My grt uncle Arthur was recruited as a spy against the Nazi's when serving in Gibralter and was actually captured and shot whilst trying to escape - he survived. My grt Uncle Eddie served with the Chindits ( British Commando's ) in Burma under Wingate and he lived behind Jap lines fighting a hit and run guerilla war for two years with that mob - he too survived. Another Grt Uncle was stationed with the British Army in the North African campaign of WW2 and another was in the Navy running spies from Scotland to Scandanavia and doing the usual Naval warfare thing. Even my grandmother was in the ATS which was the womens aux in London during the war and she was hit by a V1 rocket at Liverpool St Station whilst waiting for a train during leave! She survived also!!!

The town where I grew up in the UK ( when not living in OZ ) and most of all my English family lived, was full of old WW2 veterans who I would talk to as a young boy; any chance I got. I was surrounded by and steeped in the spirit, stories and pride of these people who served and sacrificed so much. How could I avoid the Lee Enfield SMLE rifles? Going further back I even had an ancestor who served with the British army in India during the 1800's. There is something very special about the SMLE and the Martini rifles and even within Australia today, going back as far as I can remember, the SMLE 303 has been the constant companion of nearly all Aussie farmers, hunters and gun lovers - myself included. These rifles are part of the landscape here, they are legend!
660/Steyr 1939 K98 - 1945 No5-MKI Jungle Carbine - 1927 Lithgow SMLE No1 MKIII - 1942 Lithgow No1 MKIII* Heavy Barrel - 1941 Lithgow SMLE No1 MKIII* - No date Savage No4 MKI* - 1944 Ishevsk M44 Mosin Nagant - S.W Silver & Co Patent Transvaal Martini .22
Edited by - Tikirocker on 09/26/2006 05:51:20 AM
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Sparkbrook
Gunboards Premium Member

Australia
100 Posts

Posted - 09/26/2006 : 09:14:38 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Strange story...not really....
I was a tour guide on in island off the coast of WA called Rottnest.
Anyway, my speciality was the military tours of the 9.2 inch coastal defece guns and emplacements (WWII) and the 6 inch barracks and implacements (as well as the "bird" tour).
The local police donated 5 welded up No1 mk3 's for displays and from the time I got my hands on them I was hooked! As they were stored where we were having our daily meeting I of course I was driven to distraction and having them sitting a meter from where I was sitting.
From that I was spured to buy a de-act No4 Mk1 and I even traded some gear for one of those No1 rifles.
I then dicovered I was old enough to get a Firearms Licence and the rest they say is history!!!!
I love the smell of cordite in the morning.
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John W
Gunboards Super Premium Member

USA
445 Posts

Posted - 09/26/2006 : 2:40:26 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Stumbled across a beautiful '43 Maltby at a gun show several years ago. Had a very interesting conversation with the guy selling it, would up buying it from him. Opened up the site that Sukey (yes, darn him) used to hang out on and was hooked!
John W
Life is good! (sure beats the alternative)
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bones92
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

4200 Posts

Posted - 09/26/2006 : 4:00:44 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I'll expound a bit on my earlier reply... I had heard from some other lieutenant about these old milsurp rifles at the Rose's department store. I went to the one in New Bern, NC and had them bring a few out. Lord knows what I passed over, not having a clue what to look for. I picked a No4 Mk1 with really oily wood, but metal finish in great shape. It's an FTR rifle. I refinished the stock and have had it ever since. Bore is like new.

I didn't get another Enfield until I found a No1 MkIII* made in 1942(?). All matching except I think the buttstock is a replacement. Forearm matches, though.

I don't know what it is about Enfields, but they seem to appeal to many Americans. I think it may be because we identify with British culture and history, and Enfields are sort of like first-cousin to US milsurp stuff, only a LOT more affordable.
Whatever happens, we have got
the Maxim gun, and they have not.
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John Sukey
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

USA
9613 Posts

Posted - 09/26/2006 : 4:12:29 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Interesting to know I am cursed by folks for just redirecting their finances. You people probably would have only wasted it on booze and fast women otherwise.
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MauserboyM48
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

USA
1251 Posts

Posted - 09/26/2006 : 5:32:51 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Watching WWII movies with British troops in them. Namely The Longest Day, A Bridge Too Far andt The Desert Rats.

Also, Enfields are 1337.


www.ronpaul2008.com Join the Revolution. Ron Paul 2008.

"The main thing is to make history, not to write it."
-Otto Von Bismarck

"If you strike me down I shall become more powerful than you can possibly imagine."

Every collector needs:
A Mauser variation
A Mosin-Nagant
An Enfield
A K31
A M1
A M95
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Oldbrass
Gunboards Premium Member

USA
231 Posts

Posted - 09/28/2006 : 9:53:38 PM Show Profile Visit Oldbrass's Homepage Reply with Quote
Easy. I love Mausers and I was hunting for a Gew98 for my collection. Went to Gunbroker and typed in "1916". Two seconds later, an un-import marked, 1916 No.1 MkIII pooped up. Matching to the wood and though looking a bit rough, had a good bore.

I knew next to nothing about it and put in my winning bid (Had to bid it up too!). Now I roll my own and treasure range time with it. It's easily one of the high points of my collection. Still need to track down that darned Gew98 I was looking for.
20th Maine


"How soon we forget history... Government is not reason. Government is not eloquence. It is force. And, like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master."
-George Washington
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Jungles
Gunboards Super Premium Member

USA
392 Posts

Posted - 09/30/2006 : 4:00:41 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I've been collecting and shooting for going on 40 years, and was even part owner of a gun store for a time. I'd owned the odd Enfield a few times. A Jungle Carbine, maybe a No. 4 or two, but never for very long, and not with any particular interest aside from their being WW2 weapons. (My Civil War collection contains a few Enfield rifle muskets, but I don't consider them quite the same thing.) Most of my collection has always been pretty much US military, give or take a Kar 98K or two, the occassional Arisaka, and the above-mentioned Enfields.

That said, I'd always told myself that I'd like to pick up a nice SMLE some day, just for the sake of having one. More because they were interesting and historically significant, and looked kind of classy, than anything else, and not with any particular thought of really becoming interested in them technically or as a collecting focus.

Then I came across a really nice '41 Lithgow at a gun show a few years ago. And the rest, as the saying goes, is history. Still only own a couple, but I fully expect that to change.

Great rifles to take to the range and embarrass scope-sighted AR-15 types with......
Jim Cameron
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jb303
Starting Member

USA
8 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2006 : 01:25:44 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
The 1915 dated BSA No1 MkIII* my father gave me in 1968, for my 14th birthday started it all for me...
My father was a serious gun collector, hunter and lover of all things historical and apparently thought that I'd earned my stripes with the Savage single shot .22 he'd gotten me a year before. The fact that I was very interested in history (especially WWI and II) also helped my cause and convinced him that I had graduated into a higher level of collecting. By the way, the above mentioned SMLE cost him the princely sum of $14.95, fresh out of the shipping box from Century Arms, was non-import marked (not a requirement at the time thankfully...) and included a bayonet. While it is not a rare or unusual piece, it shot reasonably well and gave me an appreciation of the men that carried them and upon which they staked their lives.
Over the next 5 years, my dad gave me several Mausers a Carcano, a Webley MkVI, and a bubba'ed beyond belief Savage made No 4 Mk I. to begin my military gun collection.
My interest in gun collecting continued to blossom (my wife prefers to call it a 'disease', what does she know...) over the years and took it's toll, but with a slightly different focus. 66 guns later, I had assembled a nice collection of Winchesters, Savages, Brownings, Colts, Rugers and other assorted classic American sporting guns.

As with all collectors of antiques, furniture, etc., gun collecters are subject to 'phases of interest' or 'changes in focus' and I am no different.
Thanks to the knowledgeable folks populating this and other gunboards forums and the fascinating information they regularly discuss, I have come to the realization that my interest in Lee-Enfields had not waned, but was only 'temporarily dormant'.
I am only beginning to appreciate the detailed study of the wide variation in models,technicana and unit history as well as some of the interesting design subtleties, such as the proper bedding of an Enfield, to make it shoot straight.
I think my sporting collection ambitions have been more than satisfied and that maybe it's time to return to what got me into this absorbing avocation in the first place.
Although I only have the No1 and bubba'ed No4 to start with, I am now getting a chronic urge to expand my Lee-Enfield collection with a No4 MkI (unbubba'ed) as well as a CLLE rifle and carbine. After that, who knows what else...maybe a Lithgow No1 MkIII, in honor of all of our partners in sin, in Oz.
Thanks guys, you have created yet another raving maniac, in your own image!




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Joe Turner
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

USA
1145 Posts

Posted - 10/08/2006 : 12:46:21 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
My first military rifle was a Remington 7MM Rolling Block carbine bought new for $13.00 in 1955. Ammunition was a dollar for 15 rounds. I was 13 years old then and spent the first money I had ever really worked for. I have had many ( and still do ) military rifles since then but my favorite turn bolt magazine rifle has got to be the SMLE, any year, any maker and Mark. I do have a fondness for Lithgows but one of my favorite shooters is a 1947 Ishapore SMLE. This fine series of rifles has been everywhere and still keeps on shooting. I have a Long Lee coming to me soon, my first and I am really looking forward to handling and shooting that one too! I also really like the cartridge, both military and commercial and find that properly loaded and used by a good rifleman is one of the best rimmed cartridges ever made and used. I am proud to own some of these fine weapons and to associate and communicate with fellow collectors of the Enfield Rifle.. Best Regards, Joe
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goo
Gunboards.Com Silver Star Member

USA
783 Posts

Posted - 10/11/2006 : 4:34:32 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
i never got into enfields.
they got into me.
ed flanagan
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Mauser308
Gunboards Super Premium Member

333 Posts

Posted - 10/12/2006 : 6:12:06 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Are there other options????
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
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896 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
sandpaper1987
Gunboards Member

USA
76 Posts

Posted - 10/17/2006 : 11:35:44 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Ever since I saw the Lee Enfield I knew I wanted one. The profile, the size and all the rumors I had heard surrounding it that supposedly said these were among the finest rifles in the world. I just purcahsed my No4 MK1 about 2 months ago and I am absolutely in love with it. My only regret with the gun was that I should have gotten it sooner!! The action is amazing, and I really perfer the sights and trigger pull and more manageable recoil of my SMLE than of my M1938 Nagant. When you put your hands on an SMLE you can feel the quality and persision of the mechanisms. I am so into enfields that I have already desided to put purchaseing a mause off so I can get another SMLE, the no3's i think are the ones whith the full lenght stock? And perhaps a No5 jungle carbine somday. What more can I say? Best damn gun in the world. Period!
1.) 1944 Izhevsk M38 (All matching #'s!)
2.) ?? Savage No4. MK1 (Mismatched Bolt)
3.) Ruger 10/22 40th Aniversry Ed.
4.) 1963 Romainian AK-47
5.) 1944 Izhevsk 91/30 (All matching #'s!)
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Sporky
Gunboards Super Premium Member

USA
414 Posts

Posted - 10/17/2006 : 1:41:28 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote

quote:Originally posted by sandpaper1987

Ever since I saw the Lee Enfield I knew I wanted one. The profile, the size and all the rumors I had heard surrounding it that supposedly said these were among the finest rifles in the world. I just purcahsed my No4 MK1 about 2 months ago and I am absolutely in love with it. My only regret with the gun was that I should have gotten it sooner!! The action is amazing, and I really perfer the sights and trigger pull and more manageable recoil of my SMLE than of my M1938 Nagant. When you put your hands on an SMLE you can feel the quality and persision of the mechanisms. I am so into enfields that I have already desided to put purchaseing a mause off so I can get another SMLE, the no3's i think are the ones whith the full lenght stock? And perhaps a No5 jungle carbine somday. What more can I say? Best damn gun in the world. Period!



The No. 4 is not a SMLE. The full length you're (probably) thinking of is the SMLE. Snub nose, barrel mounted open sight. Later known as the No. 1. (The No. 3 is a modified Mauser action rifle.) If you think the action of the No. 4 is amazing, get yourself into a quality SMLE - like greased lightning.
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sandpaper1987
Gunboards Member

USA
76 Posts

Posted - 10/17/2006 : 3:50:05 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote

quote:Originally posted by Sporky

quote:Originally posted by sandpaper1987

Ever since I saw the Lee Enfield I knew I wanted one. The profile, the size and all the rumors I had heard surrounding it that supposedly said these were among the finest rifles in the world. I just purcahsed my No4 MK1 about 2 months ago and I am absolutely in love with it. My only regret with the gun was that I should have gotten it sooner!! The action is amazing, and I really perfer the sights and trigger pull and more manageable recoil of my SMLE than of my M1938 Nagant. When you put your hands on an SMLE you can feel the quality and persision of the mechanisms. I am so into enfields that I have already desided to put purchaseing a mause off so I can get another SMLE, the no3's i think are the ones whith the full lenght stock? And perhaps a No5 jungle carbine somday. What more can I say? Best damn gun in the world. Period!



The No. 4 is not a SMLE. The full length you're (probably) thinking of is the SMLE. Snub nose, barrel mounted open sight. Later known as the No. 1. (The No. 3 is a modified Mauser action rifle.) If you think the action of the No. 4 is amazing, get yourself into a quality SMLE - like greased lightning.



So your saying the No1's are the ones I should look for? Where can I find one of these in decent condition?
1.) 1944 Izhevsk M38 (All matching #'s!)
2.) ?? Savage No4. MK1 (Mismatched Bolt)
3.) Ruger 10/22 40th Aniversry Ed.
4.) 1963 Romainian AK-47
5.) 1944 Izhevsk 91/30 (All matching #'s!)
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Sporky
Gunboards Super Premium Member

USA
414 Posts

Posted - 10/17/2006 : 6:48:05 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Oooh, that is the question that torments us all. Brian Dick has some that look pretty nice, but they are not cheap. You could try Tom DuBay at East West Military, he's a nice guy and helpful though I don't know if they have many left. How much are you looking to spend? How old and/or original a rifle are you looking for?
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sandpaper1987
Gunboards Member

USA
76 Posts

Posted - 10/17/2006 : 10:30:52 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote

quote:Originally posted by Sporky

Oooh, that is the question that torments us all. Brian Dick has some that look pretty nice, but they are not cheap. You could try Tom DuBay at East West Military, he's a nice guy and helpful though I don't know if they have many left. How much are you looking to spend? How old and/or original a rifle are you looking for?



Well, I honestly don't have much of a budget right now, but at a later time perhaps. If the condition of the gun is stuff I could fix myself or have a gunsmith do with a minum of work, that is the condition i look for. I'm assuming that all SMLE is expencive? If that is the case, what are the prices on a no4 sniper varient, I would really enjoy a scope on one of these rifles!
1.) 1944 Izhevsk M38 (All matching #'s!)
2.) ?? Savage No4. MK1 (Mismatched Bolt)
3.) Ruger 10/22 40th Aniversry Ed.
4.) 1963 Romainian AK-47
5.) 1944 Izhevsk 91/30 (All matching #'s!)
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arkady
Gunboards Premium Member

137 Posts

Posted - 10/18/2006 : 07:42:25 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
My first rifle was a #4 mk 1 that some idiot had butchered. Plastic stock, drilled receiver for cheap Tasco scope, shortened barrel, all the usual bubbafications.

But it made me curious about Enfields in general, and I started learning about these rifles and their history. I bought a #5 JC from SOG (the first and last purchase I will ever make from SOG), and spent a lot of time restoring it to good operating condition and original appearance. Then I bought a mint Maltby 5-groove #4 from Springfield Sporters. Then an Ishapore 2A1. I still have and shoot all three. These are great rifles, and have a long and fascinating history.

The thing that amazed me (and still does) is that these fine rifles are so undervalued. Even the crummiest Mauser goes for more than a mint Enfield! This can't go on forever.
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Sporky
Gunboards Super Premium Member

USA
414 Posts

Posted - 10/18/2006 : 3:15:11 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote

quote:Originally posted by sandpaper1987I'm assuming that all SMLE is expencive? If that is the case, what are the prices on a no4 sniper varient, I would really enjoy a scope on one of these rifles!



Oh, not at all. You pay more for quality, like anything else. Ishapores are decent shooters and don't cost much, because they'll never be as collectible as the other makes.

Sniper rigs are insane. Brian Dick has one now in the chest for $4000.

Need to stop hijacking the thread...

quote:Even the crummiest Mauser goes for more than a mint Enfield! This can't go on forever.



I hope it does! I dread the day when the prices get really crazy.
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marmaloon
Gunboards Member

36 Posts

Posted - 10/18/2006 : 3:28:54 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
When I was in my youth, my brother brought home a FTR Lithgow SMLE that had lots of parts robbed off of it, It had the usual bubba stock. I ran out of funds to restore it back then I only managed to get a breech for it, it was test fired and thiat was it, it sat idle for about 20 years. I am currently restoring it to some kind of shooting condition with full wood. This has been an expensive process, but what the hay, I didn't do it for the economics of it. My dad when he was alive pointed out that it was a good gun, if cared for, and he managed to mention " to have and to hold". Cool, eh?
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ww2crazy
Gunboards Premium Member

Australia
207 Posts

Posted - 10/19/2006 : 08:20:52 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
i got into enfields as a lad, my dad was copper in the NT, his standard arm was a 32 beretta and a jungle carbine, soon as i was old enuff i went and bought a nice canadian no 4 i wish i still had, then a martini carbine, then a procession of number 3 and cadets and my trusty jungle carbine is my fav gun and has accounted for many a roo, i collect all things enfield and cant get enuff of them
To quote the late great Captian Mainwaring, "the whole thing runs like a well oiled machine you know"
Caring for
1907 Enfield No1 Mk3Heavy 1942 Lithgow No1 Mk3Heavy barrel
1943 No4 Mk 1 disguised as a Jungle Carbine
Martini Cadet .310 now chambered 32/20
1944 Lithgow Slazenger hornet .22
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Coogan
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

USA
2532 Posts

Posted - 10/23/2006 : 6:02:42 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
sandpaper1987, your Savage was not made in 1935.
Semper Fi,
Mike
Sergeant, USMCR 2111
1997-2004

Looking for:
Australian Enfields (produced or marked)
Slovak marked vz.24
Persian 98/29 Mauser
Remington Mosin rifles or Mosin rifles built on Remington receivers
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armoredman
Gunboards Member

USA
74 Posts

Posted - 10/24/2006 : 12:08:19 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I never liked the look of the Enfield. A friend tried to sell me one years ago, and said the bore was shot out, and the rounds would rattle down, striking usually within 1 to 3 feet either side of the target. Needless to say, I passed.
Years and years later, I, under HUGE budgetary restraints, wanted a rifle of one kind or another. A good friend took pity, did a twofer purchase of Mosins at J&G, and gave me a sweet refurb M38. This was the beginning of the WWII rifle interest. Finances never really improved much, and on of the two 91/30s I bought is still gone, though I did get to buy the 1920 back.
Last year, a co worker heard me talk about my WWII rifles, (still just Mosins), and asked if I liked all WWII rifles. Turned out he had an Enfield of some flavor a buddy had pawned to him whuile in the Coast Guard, for $50 of beer money. Well, this was 15 years ago, and he had never fired it, just kept it in the safe, and he just wanted his beer money back.
Something told me, jump on it, so I did, and my 1943 FTR Longbranch No4MK1* has been truely amazing. It is accurate, sweet to shoot, and fun to reload for.
Still won't win any beauty contests, (that's for the 1903A3 and K98 to battle over), but I can see why the English used it for so long. It is now my number 2 SHTF rifle, right behind the Yugo SKS.]
If total government control equals safety, why are prisons so dangerous?
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tedley
Gunboards.Com Silver Star Member

603 Posts

Posted - 10/25/2006 : 4:18:23 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Years ago, in the late 50's-early 60's I recall the No. 1 MkII*'s on sale at W.T. Grants for around $9.00 each. I was just a kid at the time, but the shape of the gun intrigued me. Around 1970-71 I got a mint No4 Mk.I, Brit made, for $20, in a batch brought in by Interarms. This gun is the best rifle I've ever shot. I don't care what folks say about Finn Mosins. I had this up to around ten years ago, but had to sell due to finances. In between I also had two of the No. 1, MKIII*'s as well. They were both nice and even the one with the sewer pipe bore shot well. I was impressed. Just got some inheritance funds in and got a Savage No. 4 Mk. I* with bayonet. I'd eventually like one of the No. 1 MkIII*'s again. I've fired Mausers, Mosins, Springfields, Garands, and I still prefer the Enfield.
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killisnoo
Starting Member

1 Posts

Posted - 10/31/2006 : 04:41:55 AM Show Profile Visit killisnoo's Homepage Reply with Quote
My first post on a gun forum.
When I was about 10 years old (1960's) I saw a rack of 303 enfields
for sale at a hardware store in Ketchikan Alaska, they were $13.00
each. I begged my dad to buy me one, as I thought I could finally
own my own rifle.
He refused as he said "it was not big enough for Brown Bear protection.

Well, years later a friend gave me a no.4 mk1 which sat in my gun rack, as my main rifles have been 30-06 and 375 H&H.
Well since 9-11 everyone goes nuts whenever you carry rifles, even
here in Alaska.
So for ease of transportation and less drama, I've now switch to
the 303 cal. enfield.
I simply disconnect the stock with a long screwdriver, disconnect
the scope and mounts with 2 thumbscrews and put the entire rifle
in my pack. Nobody goes crazy and it fits easy into the float-plane.
Yes my father was right,,,it is a bit light for Brownies, but it's
all about bullet placement and being on your toes.
I
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Boyntonbubba
Platinum Bullet Club

USA
1283 Posts

Posted - 10/31/2006 : 1:44:36 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
My brother had one when I was young. It was 1960/61. He had a No4MkI. And it kicked like a mule. I was 9 or 10 at the time. I loved that gun. I got my first Enfield (No1MkIII* 1918) in 2001. I have had as many as 11. Now I have only 6. 4-NoIMkIII* and 2 No4MkI*. I don't shoot much anymore, But I like to look at them.

Al
There aren't any guarentees out here. EXCEPT..if your between me and the finish line. You'll WISH you WERE'NT.
Dale Earnhardt...1951-2001...Go Dale #3

Now an official Maine (iac) . They call them "Mainers" When I was living here 30 years ago we were called Mainiacs. Go figure.

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marmaloon
Gunboards Member

36 Posts

Posted - 11/02/2006 : 01:18:57 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
armoredman, for a small fee, I will be willing to take that 'ugly' gun off your hands. Just kidding, best regards. A .303 is gun enough for me, unless I have to say hello to a Grizzly up close. Grandpa shot a Polar bear with one back in the day in Labrador. It was the most firepower people could get back in those days.
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armoredman
Gunboards Member

USA
74 Posts

Posted - 11/04/2006 : 12:24:21 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Ah, thanks, but I do believe i have grown attached. Not to mention I have more $ in dies, brass, and bullets than I have in the rifle!
My bolt action SHTF rifle...
If total government control equals safety, why are prisons so dangerous?
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Kivaari
Gunboards.Com Silver Star Member

761 Posts

Posted - 11/10/2006 : 4:29:44 PM Show Profile Visit Kivaari's Homepage Reply with Quote
My first Enfield was a "new" No. 4. I'd recently acquired a batch of the really good South African ammo. After shooting the rifle I was hooked. In prone, I could consistently smack our gong at 400 yards...about 14" plate.

Second acquisition was a Jovino No.1. When I found out the "deal" on this rifle, I sold it...wished I still had that rifle regardless of being assembled from parts. Duh...
kivaari
over 600 quality SKS trigger tunes and repairs
www.kivaari.com
NRA Endowment Member
Life Member Texas State Rifle Assoc



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JACK71
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

USA
1450 Posts

Posted - 12/02/2006 : 11:44:36 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
The price ($65). Plus I didn't have any Enfields yet!
When they come for my guns, THEY BETTER BRING THEIRS.
When I was young the enemies of my country were called Communists. Today they are called Liberal Democrats.
Milsurpitis is FUN......but I'm gonna need a bigger house.
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berserkerboy
Gunboards Member

Australia
79 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2006 : 02:16:55 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I've always wanted an enfield, they are known as .303's here

They are a part of Australian history, I've wanted one since I was a little kid.

I only got my shooter's licence at the beginning of the year and since then have bought a nice Lithgow 1942 No1 Mk III in very good condition with matching numbers and nice wood

Last week I bought a 1950 Long Branch No 4 Mk1*

I would love to buy a number 5 next - anyone here know where I can get one?
Edited by - berserkerboy on 12/09/2006 03:28:23 AM
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sigshr
Gunboards Premium Member

USA
208 Posts

Posted - 12/07/2006 : 7:27:40 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
W.H.B Smith's "Small Arms of the World" was my introduction to
milsurps. At present I have 7 Lee Enfields-3 No. 1 Mk IIIS (or SMLEs)
if you prefer, 3 No. 4 Mk Is, a No. 5 Mk I. Also a P-17 and a Ross
Mark III. And a Nice Pistol No. 2 (Revolver).
sigshr
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harrymac
Gunboards Member

United Kingdom
11 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2006 : 5:03:48 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
When I was a lad I was rummaging about in the loft and found a 1948 British Army training pamphlet on the Rifle 303 No4. That started my interest. I got practical instruction from my dad on a Diana Mod 25 air rifle when I was 8 years old and I got my first air rifle for my 11th birthday. It was a brand new Webley Hawk MkII and it was my pride and joy. I still have it.
When I was 13 I joined the army cadets and we had DP No4's, and some No8 rifles to use on the 20 yd tube range. As soon as I saw the Lee Enfield in the flesh I knew I wanted one. I didn't actually get to own one until I was in my 30's, up until that time I collected air rifles and then got into collecting pistols. By the time the great British Gov't got round to banning them (may those responsible rot in hell!) I had a 1916 P08 by Erfurt, a "red9" Mauser C96 with matching holster/stock, Browning GP35, Berretta 1934, Zastava M70, and a Dan Wesson 357 "pistol pack" with 2.5", 4", 6" and 8" barrels.
After handing in all my pistols I saw a SMLE in the surplus section of Frankonia Jagd in Hannover, Germany and knew that I was going to take that rifle away with me. My collection of British army rifles now consists of the afore-mentioned SMLE, a No4 Mk1/2 (F), a MkV SMLE, a Remington P14, a MKII Martini Henry and a 22 Martini Enfield converted by W.W. Greener for the SMRC. High on the wish list are a LE cavalry carbine and a No5 "jungle carbine".
The difference between an Englishman and an American: One thinks that 100 miles is a long way, the other that 100 years is a long time.
HM.
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Nickathome
Gunboards Premium Member

USA
169 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2006 : 7:18:04 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
My father came home with a No4 rifle one day. He bought it at a local department store. Just out of the blue he came home with it. Until then, I did not think he had any interest in old military rifles. Until that time, the both of us pretty much just collected your run of the mill hunting arms. He had said that when he gone to that store, it was for something else, and he just happened to see the guns for sale (I think he paid well under $75.00 at the time) and decided then that he wanted one. After handling that gun myself, I had to have one. I went back a short time later and bought mine. I paid $85.00 for mine because it was in better shape than the one he bought and was on a rack marked as such. That was it for me, I was hooked although I only bought one more Enfield (my No.5). I owe my interest in old military rifles to my dad and his Enfield. I'm sure one day his No. 4 (as well as all his other guns)will all be residing in my cabinet.
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Tango
Gunboards Super Premium Member

Canada
301 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2006 : 10:08:55 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
For me, it was the Royal Canadian Army Cadets in the late 60's. We fired C No.7's in the basement of our high school after class (can you imagine?), and No.4's at the range at Niagara. But sad to say, we all relished a chance to fire the FN C1A1.

A few years later, in the Army Reserves, or Militia as we called it then, there was a surplus of .303 ammo that they were trying to fire off at the range one day. People could bring their personal rifles, and a Sergeant friend of mine had what he introduced as a Jungle Carbine. Finest looking rifle I've ever seen.

Almost 30 years later, I got together with some friends to start deer hunting again. This was during the implementation of the latest gun BS in Canada and one of the guys mentioned that he had a 303 that he didn't use and might as well get rid of it. "What kind?", I asked. "I think they call it a jungle carbine", he said. For a trade worth less than $100 (his asking price) it was mine and I was smitten all over again. I couldn't believe my luck. Less than a year later I came across a 1902 MLE, converted to CLLE Mk I I.P. that needed TLC, for less than $75 (but a lot more went into it), then No. 4 Mk 2 traded for another $75 item, then last a SMLE 410 musket, for which I obscenely over-paid. But can you pay too much for a gun that talks to you?

For now I am content. Of course, there is a 1912 ShtLE that I heard about today. And a Ross...
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craig61a
Gunboards Premium Member

243 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2006 : 10:53:36 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
My dad's one hunting rifle was a #4 MKI he bought back in the mid 50's for $ 17.00. It was 'sporterized' i.e missing the handguards and the forestock was cut and sanded round. I thought it was a neat looking rifle. I brought to school when we had gun safety after school in boy scouts.

It's in my rack now, with all of it's parts and wood in original configuration, and it's a nice shooter and in better condition than most of the ones I see being offered for sale nowadays. I have 3 #4's, a #1 MKIII, and I just picked up a P14 from my dealer tonight. Can't wait to try it out...
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esq_stu
Starting Member

USA
3 Posts

Posted - 12/26/2006 : 1:45:48 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I like military bolt actions, especially when they can be found in .308. I have an Israeli Mauser in that caliber. I started getting interested in the Enfields when gun boards started discussing the Ishapore .308, and others noted how smooth the actiom id (I agree). Bought a shortened sporter cheap as a project gun. I figure I'd make a "scout" out of it. Now I'm collecting information before I decide what to do to it.
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sniperfreak
Gunboards Premium Member

USA
205 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2006 : 01:24:54 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I started collecting enfields as part of a WW2 collection. To date, I have two Savage no.4s, two longbranch no.4s, a Fazakersley no.4(T), and a no.1 mk.III* grenade launching rifle.
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XBC351
Starting Member

Australia
8 Posts

Posted - 12/30/2006 : 02:19:31 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Simple, every Aussie needs a .303. It's got to be in the constitution somewhere.
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rattrod
Starting Member

USA
4 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2007 : 2:07:03 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Long story short the need of a dirt cheap rifle first led me to be interested in the smle .I purchaced a flawless (unfired?) savage #4,1* and cut it all up . Seemed like the thing to do at the time(89-90?). Much like the 60's "muscle cars" some of us ruined ,they were cheap and plentiful.
My teenaged son has renewed my interest in the smle . He borrowed the aforementioned #4
to hunt with this year .Offered to buy it from me "if i ever wanted to sell it". I didn't , but i did buy him a nice #5 JC for xmas . His interest in collecting and preserving these old
weapons is contagious. We have since bought a #2 mk4 trainer and would have bought a #1 mk 111
bsa last night, (if it wasn't for that WOMAN that lives here with us ..she's always saying all this sensible stuff)
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RAMBO RULZ
Gunboards Premium Member

Canada
138 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2007 : 9:24:07 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I've got one of those here too!!(the wife I mean). Fortunatly I've also got a "U.S Property" no.4 mk1* Savage. My grandfather had one growing up, I would stare at it for hours. He is a WW2 veteran, may have been a souvenier, don't know, never asked, he never talked about it. We visit him each summer (other side of country), last visit, Enfield was gone! RCMP demanded he renew his possession license or gun had to be destroyed. Gramp sayed; "Take the friggin thing, and shove it up yur arse, I never liked it anyways!!".
Now its either recycled metal or, a corrupt officers pride and joy! In Canada your license expires after so many years. If you dont pay your renewal fee in time and have registered firearms, cops come knockin. You either take a 1 and a half day coarse to renew or, go to jail or, give em up. Anyways, bought my Enfield 6- months ago. Nothing like Gramps but it'll have to do . Actually, I love it, its beautifull, shoots amazing, and I enjoy the history of these guns. How do I get the same enjoyment from that woman that lives here!!!
Any ideas ratrod??
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jaz5833
Gunboards Super Premium Member

366 Posts

Posted - 01/20/2007 : 02:58:57 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
After obtaining a Swiss K31 at Big 5 I decided to get my C&R license since most of the gun shops in my area had been closin' down. An Enfield was just an unavoidable result In fact so was a Mosin...and a Mauser.....and a Stery...and....well you understand.
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srinde
Gunboards Member

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 02/08/2007 : 9:23:40 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I would have to say what did it for me was the famous photo of the german tank crew surrendering to a commonwealth soldier in n africa.the thing looks as posed as heck, but still cool.
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Fletch
Gunboards Super Premium Member

South Africa
435 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2007 : 03:25:53 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote

quote:Originally posted by srinde

I would have to say what did it for me was the famous photo of the german tank crew surrendering to a commonwealth soldier in n africa.the thing looks as posed as heck, but still cool.



This one

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Who's been stiring up the natives
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LeeSpeed
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

USA
1024 Posts

Posted - 02/16/2007 : 12:12:35 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
About 1964 my oldest brother bought a No 1 LE from a schoolmate chum whose Dad wanted to get rid of it. Bro hid it above the books on the shelf in the TV room since firearms were "Verboten" in the household at the time and he was about 15 years old anyhow. When Mom and Dad weren't home he'd pull down the old clunker and take aim at Hardy Kruger or any other fellow of Teutonic ancestry he could find on our staticy B&W TV set. As I understand it, he must have accounted for many scores and even shot down a few ME109's, too.

I was too young to know what was going on but my sister was old enough to rat, and she did, telling the Powers-That-Be. After the Nuclear Event subsided, elder brother understood that he too was to part with the Lee, which he did by swapping it for a trumpet to another kid in the band. Said kid rode over to our house on his bike, traded the trumpet and rode home through town with the old ten-shooter slung across his back, on his way home peddling by the county Sheriff's department and prison, county courthouse and Methodist Church where my Dad was the Pastor.

That poor old Enfield must have gotten passed around the High School like a Christmas fruitcake and who knows where it now resides.

Anyway, till I was near 15 myself there was only ever one rifle; the results of the diligence of Mr Lee and the engineers at ordnance factory Enfield whose work gave our family "The Lost Enfield". I've since found out that there are other rifles, and I only own two Lees now, but I have a fondness for those rear-lockers that just won't go away with the years.

For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whosoever believes in him should not perish but have everlasting life. Jn 3:16 Verbum Domini Manet in Aeternum.
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Doc_Holiday
Starting Member

USA
7 Posts

Posted - 03/21/2007 : 3:45:12 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
My interest collected in Enfield's (and all World War II guns) by reading World War II history books and playing World War II video games (I know...sad).
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SlimTim
TN-GA Shooters Forum Moderator

USA
5238 Posts

Posted - 03/21/2007 : 4:23:46 PM Show Profile Visit SlimTim's Homepage Reply with Quote
Sometime shortly after y2k my interest in surplus pistols grew into an interest in surplus rifles. After adding a Svede, a Mosin or two, and an SKS to the collection, I thought I'd try to assemble a representative WWII collection. Took my time, wasn't in a hurry, and one day it happened. I found a guy walking around a gun show with a nice, not new, but nice all the same, war dated Lithgow for $80. All matching, and those lines! What's not to like about a rifle that has a buttsocket?

I didn't know the difference between a #1 and a # 4 at the time. Presently I have a couple dozen or more Enfields.

SlimTim
Budweiser's Real Man of Genius: Mr. Gun Show Junkie.
Better Fred than red!
http://fred08.com
Georgians, Tennesseans, join your neighbors here!
Edited by - SlimTim on 03/21/2007 4:24:41 PM
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rule.303
Gunboards Member

Ukraine
23 Posts

Posted - 04/04/2007 : 6:25:00 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I saw immortal sargaent when I was young and just became facinated with the SMLE with that distinctive stock. And now after several years I was able to purchase some and continue to collect and most important of all take them out and shoot them.
we got them, and we shot them under rule.303
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FamineDynasty0
Starting Member

USA
4 Posts

Posted - 04/05/2007 : 8:02:18 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
This excerpt from Steve Coll's book Ghost Wars recently sparked my interest. He's speaking of the early CIA aid to the Afghan jihadists fighting the Soviets: "The first guns shipped in were bolt action .303 Lee Enfield rifles, a standard British infantry weapon until the late 1950's. With it's heavy wooden stock and antique design, it was not an especially exciting weapon, but it was accurate and powerful. Hart regarded it as a far superior weapon to the flashier communist made AK-47 assault rifle, which looked sleek and made a lot of noise but was less powerful and difficult to aim."
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Wiley455
Gunboards Premium Member

USA
177 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2007 : 08:03:37 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
How I got into Enfields: Back in '79 or '80 I attended a small gun show with a couple friends. They were buying WW2 German stuff, 98K's, G-43's, Natsi militaria, etc. I wasn't really into the military stuff then. Especially German! My Grandpa was one of the guys that crawled onto Omaha Beach on D-Day. More the dirt bikes, muscle cars (I had a sweet '73 340 'Cuda at the time) and deer hunting kind I was. While wandering down the aisles with my hands in my pockets I glanced down at a No1 rifle with pretty 'yellow' wood on it. Of course I didn't know it was a No1 rifle at the time. Just looked, didn't touch. Left without buying anything. However that evening I just couldn't get the image of that No1 out of my head. I tried to fight it off, tossing and turning in the bed, breaking out in sweats. The next day, Sunday afternoon, I was parked in my usual spot on the sofa fighting off a Bicardi 151 headache, when that Bogart film 'Sahara' came on TV. I watched as the British guys were aiming at the German guys in the funny WW1 helmets with their MKIII's. Of course I didn't know they were MKIII's at the time. I couldn't take my eyes off that cool looking blunt business end of the Enfields. I was hooked.
Weeks later my girlfriend, Julie, and I went downtown to do a little shopping. Next door to a place she wanted to go was a small gun shop. We wandered in. As soon as I stepped in the door I spotted that blunt business end sitting in a rack. I went over and picked it up. The price was a whopping $80.00. I flipped it around, played with the bolt, put finger prints all over the nicely oiled metal, I think I might even have dropped it once. I could tell the owner wasn't real impressed with my handling of his merchandise. In leaving I remarked to Julie how neat I thought that thing was, looking back at it several times as we stepped out the door.
A couple months later came Christmas. Julie was over to eat dinner with the family and open gifts and such. After all had eaten and I had opened my usual socks and underwear packages, Julie came waltzing in with this long narrow nicely wrapped package. "For me" I exclaimed.
I tore into the box and lit up when I pulled out that MKIII. I'll never forget that rifle. It was an Enfield made MKIII* dated 1918 in very nice shape. I should have married that girl!
From there it blossomed. Over the years I have been in and out of collecting Lee-Enfields. Had a big collection until a divorce back in 1990. Back when good stuff could fairly easily be found and cheap. Even had a No1 MKVI at one time, the crown of my collection.
It is true when some members on here say Enfields are addictive. Once you develope a love for these things it does not leave you. I would sell out my built up collections since and regret it a day later. And here I am again, back trying to start up a collection of Enfields, just when the prices have shot through the roof. But it is good to look up and see a familiar rifle hanging on the wall again. I'm in it for the long term this time. Sorry for the long read.
Greg
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K98a Man
Gunboards Premium Member

USA
239 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2007 : 08:32:36 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
They are IMHO the slickest bolt action rifle I have ever fired. The very first milsurp I bought was a 1918Mk.3 BSA. I still have it after some 30 years! They are very impressive with that long bayonet attached
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rwoods
Gunboards Premium Member

USA
160 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 : 10:59:58 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
While recovering from the radiation and chemotherapy required to beat my cancer last year, I set up our spare room into a "therapy" gun room. I used my son's old computer desk as my work station and began going through all of my Colts, Remingtons, and Winchesters; giving them what I describe as a "historical restoration" (complete disassembly, cleaning, and reassembly without altering the metal or wood finish in any way). I found I could work on these daily from 1-3pm daily before crashing.
After I finished mine, I would do the same for friends and family members. When my brother-in-law heard of my "therapy", he dropped off about 9 weapons from his closet. One was a 1949 No4 MkI with a broken head bolt spring taped to the stock. He said he picked it up at a pawn shop years ago, set it in the closet and "forgot" about it.
Three weeks later, when he came to pick up his guns, I asked if he would consider selling me his Enfield since it was a completely new experience for me and I wanted to do a thorough bolt repair and "historical restoration" on it. He smiled and handed it to me saying "It's Yours!...since I was "battling cancer, I might as well spend some time with an authentic example of a weapon that has seen battle itself in South Africa". Since that day I have added a 1918 BSA No1 MkIII with a matching Vickers bayonet (on its way), and two K98 Mauser "bring backs"; a "ce 42" from JP Sauer and Sons and "dou. 44" with matching "cof 44" bayonet.
I am now cancer free and look forward to the day I can take my brother-in-law to the range and shoot both Enfields.
thanks for reading!
Ron
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Remington720
Gunboards Member

USA
20 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2007 : 6:18:14 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Reading military history, reading Finn Aagaard articles and watching bad war movies.
JR
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Michigan Gunner
Starting Member

USA
7 Posts

Posted - 04/24/2007 : 7:40:31 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I always liked the look. They ( No 1's No. 4's & 5's) are also the best "fighting" bolt action there is. Back in the 1980's they were also inexpensive to buy......which is always a plus. Up untill the last few years, a nice one was often no more than $150.00 US.

BTW, I have a P14, which is really an enfield/mauser, that is a real tack driver! I also have a Mark V (1946) and a very nice Long Branch No. 4 Mark 1* and a few more.

Fun to shoot and own!
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Jimmay
Gunboards Member

USA
14 Posts

Posted - 04/25/2007 : 10:35:59 PM Show Profile Visit Jimmay's Homepage Reply with Quote
I think what got me into a "Smelly" was when I watched "Guns of the World" with the British Service Arms, when I saw the No.1 Mk lll demonstrated, I was hooked.
"No Mama, No Papa, No Uncle Sam"- philippine Scouts

No.4 Mk.1, M1 Garand, Norinco SKS, Yugo SKS, Gew 88, CZ 52, Rock Island M1911a1, Mosin Nagant M91/30
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TomcatPC
Gunboards Member

53 Posts

Posted - 05/13/2007 : 11:12:35 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Hello Everyone

Mark here, this is my first post on this forum.

As for the driving force that got me into the Lee Enfield Rifle? A couple years after I got out of the Service I ended up moved to Homer, Alaska, where I decided it might be a good idea to have a rifle with a bit more power than my single shot Stevens-Savage Model 15B .22 Rifle...LOL. At first I was thinking about trying to find a Mauser 98K, but had thought about the Lee Enfield Rifle also at the time. In the end I went with the Lee Enfield. Both of my parents are/(were, my Mother is dead) of English ancestry, both were second generation born in the U.S., so being of English heritage made me lean towards the Lee Enfield.

In 2000 after the PDF checks were sent I drove up to Anchorage where I found a "sporterized" No.4 Mk.I* for $100 at Turpin Guns. A few months I had looking as close as possible as it would have in 1942. I had a great time "restoring" that rifle. Looking forward to finding a few more down the road.
Thank you
Mark
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Marlon
Starting Member

Australia
3 Posts

Posted - 05/18/2007 : 11:44:57 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Stories of ANZAC's dying at Gallipoli, The Lighthorse charging Beesheba, my Great uncle lying in wait of the Japanese in Papua New Guinea with a SMLE and 7 rounds on him. That's two more next to the bloke lying next to him because he's a better shot. One of Dad's mates blowing his toe off with a .303 blank. Kangaroo shooting as a kid with disposable Lithgow SMLE's. And finally, target shooting - because there are some things the Enfield can do that a Mauser can't.
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bootkinder
Gunboards Super Premium Member

USA
512 Posts

Posted - 05/31/2007 : 03:59:48 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I first saw the business end of a No 1 MkIII in a picture of the Beatles HELP album,(seed planted). I always noticed said rifle in various TV shows of the '60s and finally ran across one in a pawn shop of fifty dollars. The first time I shot a gallon of water and the whole thing seemed to completely vaporize I was sold. I was young and stupid and sold two but now am building up a matching rec/barrel combo (BSA 1912 NSW). This one will not be sold. No.1 Mk.III is the only real Enfield to me, all others don't matter. Well, except maybe a Savage.
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lucky dog
Gunboards Premium Member

USA
162 Posts

Posted - 06/01/2007 : 5:54:22 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Here is what started it for me. This was a Christmas present to my father from my mother in 1961. She bought it and a box of ammo at a hardware store in Charleston, West Virginia for $19.00. Dad gave it to me for Christmas 40 years later. The two groove bore is pristine and shoots as good as it looks.


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Sparky944
Gunboards Member

USA
49 Posts

Posted - 06/02/2007 : 10:35:14 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I picked a No4 up at a gunshop for under $100 back in the early 80s. Thought it looked neat and was about the only thing in the shop I could afford. Now, over 20 years later, I'm finally getting around to tinkering with it and finding out what I really have.
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Dr. Johnny Fever
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member

USA
2065 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2007 : 03:28:03 AM Show Profile Visit Dr. Johnny Fever's Homepage Reply with Quote
I was gradually drawn to them on account of my interest in British Imperial and Commonwealth military history. Previously I had thought them ungainly and unattractive rifles, but over time came to see their unique and unusual features as marks of character, and those reflective of another time.

On a personal level, they represent a connection to our family's heritage and history, one that I wanted to be able to look at and hold in my hands.

Having finally shot my Longbranch a week or so ago and having been very pleasantly surprised by the lack of excessive recoil and the comfortable ergonomics of the Enfield, I find that I am now more than hooked on them.

I wonder what will happen next...
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Dalko110
Gunboards Member

USA
76 Posts

Posted - 06/06/2007 : 12:19:25 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I bought a beat-up but VERY accurate No. 5 Mk. I for only $250, all matching. I liked it, noticing how smooth the action was, how nice it felt...and I knew I had to have more. So I got a No. 4 Mk. I. Still loved the action. Then an L59A1 trainer because it was the only thing they'd trade me. Fun! Then I got a 2A1, cheaper to shoot. And a P-14. And now two SMLE's (1918 BSA, 1943 Lithgow). And I'm hooked!
-JW
 

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Ostrogoth
Gunboards Member

USA
10 Posts

Posted - 06/19/2007 : 01:15:01 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
I picked up my first Enfield---a 1943 ROF(F) No. 4, Mk 1---a couple of years ago as part of a basic World War II rifle collection. I was very happy with it, and gradually found myself wanting an SMLE. But I couldn't find one for a decent price. Finally, at a gun show earlier this year, I found a 1917 BSA No. I, Mk III* in great shape (but mismatched bolt) for $125. I bought it and it has become one of my favorite pieces.
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Enduro400
Starting Member

USA
6 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2007 : 03:18:04 AM Show Profile Reply with Quote
Ever regret taking your hand off a gun for sale just because you see the guy next to you take a look at it? For $100 I couldn't pass up the #4 mk1 Maltby that sparked my Enfield hoarding. After that, I had to have a snub nosed MK3, which belongs to probably the most unique and fascinating rifles designs. The Brits made so many mods to every variation, every example I find is different and its amazing Ill never stop learning more about these guns. Now Im hooked on rare parts for my no1 mk1*** SMLE which is the new crown favorite.
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Amore
Starting Member

Denmark
7 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2007 : 2:36:04 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
For me the SMLE is the one and true historical rifle. Ever since I was a kid I wanted to have one of my own. The wish have come true. I have just bought a 1943 No.1 mark III dispersal rifle in a fair condition. I'm using it for historical shooting (competition). And yes, it's true. When you buy your first Enfield you might as well buy a larger safe for those to come. I'm now looking for an early No. 1 with volley sights. After that i want.......
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RamblerReb
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40 Posts

Posted - 07/22/2007 : 6:40:52 PM Show Profile Reply with Quote
My first Enfield was a 1943 Maltby that wouldn't hit the proverbial bull in the butt with a bass fiddle. She has been sold. My next was my favorite, Eleanor, a 1913 Enfield RSAF Mk III. At the same show, I picked up a No 4 Mk 1/2 that drives tacks. It has been a downward spiral of spending the rent money on Enfields and ammo ever since. I love them sinfully.
Authority is the aqua regia of golden character.
 

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First Enfield

Back about 1971 or so there was a WW1 movie in theaters named "Zepplin". In it a British Sergeant demonstrates an incendiary round by holding up and describing a Lee-Enfield MkIII and procedes to fire one shot at a hydrogen filled balloon demonstrating that they would be using this against the Zeppelin threat. Well, my Dad, a U.S. Air Forces veteran from WW2 thought of this when he saw a beat up Enfield in a local gun shop. For $40 he got a 1918 Enfield MkIII*that had a beat up stock. He lovingly refinished the stock and enjoyed shooting it with surplus stuff we picked up at misc. gun and surplus stores. Within a few years we had a No.MkIII, three No.MkIII*'s and a Long Branch No.4 MkI*. We belonged to a small gun club that had military rifle shoots and it wasn't long before we switched to .30-06's for the matches but the Enfields were fun and had character. They certainly had more markings than U.S. firearms! All those inspectors marks! I have a BSA 1916 MkIII* with a crisp "Oster Gendarmarie" stamp and 15 different British inspectors stamps on the barrel! I have never seen two No.I's alike. Each has its own personality.
 

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The purchase of a sporterized MK4 from a buddy back in 76.
Paid 25 big ones for it so I could go deer hunting.
Didnt get the deer but I did get the urge.
Still got that old sporter plus 2 #5 carbines and a 1942 marked Australian.
Like them over my 16 and 1860 Springfield
 

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Well, I bought a #5 MkI Jungle Carbine from a military surplus store in about 1988 and it's been down hill ever since...:)
 

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Call of Duty 1,A Bridge Too Far,and a few History channel shows about the british army and european rifles. got a Long Branch no.4 MK1* from my local dealer a few years back been 200% satisfied, lol, ever since (never really looked back, lol) it was my 1st high-powered rifle and it's lasted me well so far, lol
 

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Kind of a convoluted way but....

I had been listening to the G. Gordon Liddy radio show circa 1994 and he pretty much sung the praises of the Garand to the point where I went and got one. Long story short, it was one of the biggest pieces of dung imaginable and I sold it off at a gun show. At the selfsame show, a friend bought a No 4 Mk I. I liked it so much when I got my own C&R FFL sometime later, a different friend gave me one as a graduation present and it was my first Bound Book Entry. He later helped me get a Birmingham Small Heath Dispersal Rifle.

When a bunch of No 5 Jungle carbines hit the market, I got one, also picked up a Pattern 14 in the meantime and bought a WWI No I Mk III* to restore for a friend. Also bought a No 2 Mk IV trainer back to life and regret trading it off to this day.
 

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Found one in a pawn shop that was a parker hale sporter. Was able to trade it straight up for a Hi-point 9mm compact with 2 extra clips. I thought I came out ahead then when I went to the range and took out the x on the first shot I knew I won on that one and that I was hooked.
 

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1968 in high school needed a deer rifle got one in a Sporterized jungle carbine for 25 dollars at the local pawn shop (golden state?) along with 300 rnds of WWII ball thrown in. A box of Remington soft points cost me $10.00.

I shot that gun over 2000 times with the WWII ammo (at $20.00 a thousand, note all went off) and learned to shoot at 200 yards offhand with it.

The rifle was a cut down (16 1/4" barrel) #4 not a jungle #5. it had a Williams foolproof and a ramp front sight with an ivory bead. I shot 6-7 deer in NH with that rifle then gave it to my Brother in-law who had no gun on the inherited family farm other than his .410 bolt action he inherited with the farm from his father.

That particular Enfield went on to dispatch several beef creatures and hogs, let alone another 15-20 deer. It was past when he departed at 57 years of age to his youngest son where it is now doing service as a plinking and home protection rifle.

Other Enfield’s (50+) passed through my hands in the late 60’s early 70’s at unbelievable prices of 15-20 dollars. Some won in poker games as a $10 dollar poker chip. Sorry to see those days are gone.

The latest Enfield I own is an Aussie in un-issued condition and it is the most expensive one I have ever purchased. It is way too nice to shoot so I am again looking for a good shooter in the $75 .00 range. The quest is all the fun.
 

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I had just gotten my C&R FFL. Navy Arms had No.4's for $60 and a case of 1000 or 1200 WW2 surplus for about $30 (got what I paid for). Got a Longbranch 1945 with pitted bore and okay wood. It became a labor of love to bring it back.
 

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What got me into Enfields? Two things (1) Edgar Rice Burroughs "Tarzan the Terrible", Tarzan's son tracks Dad across Africa to the rescue with his "Enfield". and (2) Lawrence of Arabia.
 

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I read an article in Fighting Firearms on my lunch break one day and this article ( I think by Chuck Karwan) states that the Enfield was the best bolt action battle rifle ever fielded in combat. Big 5 sold them for $115 so I bought my first #4MKII Enfield a few years later . I shoot Mauser rifle more but I take my Enfield out from time to time. I think the main reason is because there are more 8 mm Mauser surplus than .303 :eek:
 

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I was looking on GB for a Gew98. Had my money all set aside for it and everything. When I did a search for "1916", this beautiful, matching No.1 Mk III came up. Poof went the Mauser money and shortly after, my SMLE arrived. THEN I found out what a pain it was to find surplus. So... I got a reloading kit. Now I reload for all sorts of stuff. My SMLE, T99 Arisaka, and the Mausers too. My SMLE is still one of my favorite rifles.
 

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People & Books...

I never had any regard for SMLEs until, many years ago, I read Frank de Haas's book "Bolt Action Rifles." In this, de Haas laid out a very solid argument for why the SMLE was such a good battle rifle. This fit in with my love of history and the story of the British Army in the first weeks of WW1, especially the Retreat from Mons and Le Cateau.

During the last few years, I've worked closely with a number of people from Southern India and Sri Lanka, and interest in them and their cultures and history made me think about those AIM Ishapores that were being offered. When the opportunity for an Ishapore 2A at a good price turned up, I begged my Wife successfully.

I gotta confess, I love the thing.
 

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When I was growing up (still haven't, but older now), my father picked up a sporterized No1 Mk3, later a Jungle Carbine. He gave me the No1 Mk3, I bought a sporterized No4 Mk1. Both were too modified for restoration, so I traded the No1 Mk3 for a Ruger 10-22.
After I started tuning the No4 Mk1, I found a No4 Mk1/3(F)FTR that was to become a project (it's barrel would go to the No4 Mk1, and get a target barrel in it's place), then picked up a No4 Mk2 fresh out of the wrap with 300 rounds of ammo and reloading dies.

Eventually there will be a .22 trainer, and a .410 next to the others. :D
 

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I got into Enfields because they were inexpensive. In the early Sixties, they could be bought in surplus stores for $10 and ammo was $7/100 in clips and bandoleers. With cast bullets, it was even cheaper to shoot.

Mine was a SMLE No. 1 Mk III* S/N D3006. It was stolen in 1972 from my parents house while I was overseas.

The Enfield was a good service rifle. The only bad feature was the rim on the cartridge. This occasionally caused jams if the magazine was not carefully loaded.

PED
 

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The AIM 2A $99 specials. I hesitated (this is a bad thing!) and when I found out
that they were "gone" I ordered one from FF&F (Todd). It's coming. I like the looks.
Besides, it's old military stuff, I love it!

Paul
 
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