Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got this old shell some time ago.
It is inert. Empty of powder.
It is 11 1/2" by 2 7/8" and weighs about 9 pounds approx.
It has painted on it Camp Custer Mich C.M.T.C. 1927.
The Fuze has this on it.
Model 1907 M Lot 9631-51-18 73-3-93-1 A.&.F. CO
The bottom has ridges like canelures on it.
The base is flat, solid, no threads, no holes.

So tell me all you Sherlock Holmes out there...
What do you think it is?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,555 Posts
It is a fired 75mm (or 3"). Without being able to examine it closer it's hard to say if it's Army or Navy. Also, the paint on the rotating band and the bourrelet seems to indicate that the yellow may not be original. The original paint color would tell what kind of projectile it was. Generally speaking, Shrapnel projectiles survive in one piece whereas others had an explosive charge which destroyed it. So, if I had to guess without more information to go on, I'd say it's Shrapnel.

But, it definitely is a fired 75mm or 3 inch projectile with a powder-train time fuze.

Ray
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,555 Posts
Captn

I'm sure that projectile was painted as a souvenir. Since you can ID it to a particular Camp and outfit it makes a neat collectible. I would leave it just as it is. Since Camp Custer MI is most likely an Infantry or Artillery camp the projectile is most likely Army which would make it a 75MM. (The Navy designation is 3").

Nice find

Ray
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,016 Posts
Thats a really good question. I've never seen one that I am 100% is original in color. Most that I've seen that look period were black-ish, almost bare metal. I'm pretty sure this would be the correct color, but I'm not sure enough to bet money. I've seen red ones, yellow ones, some kinda whitish in color. Some with stripes, some without.

Same with HE; I've seen those in yellow, grey, etc. When you are talking 100 yr old shells, even a repaint from the 30's looks pretty old at this point. I don't have books, I've just owned probably a dozen of them in different varieties over the years.
C
 

·
Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
Joined
·
99,339 Posts
I think that the ARMY, by WWII, was using the same olive drab body and yellow lettering for HE that remains the standard. AP Shot was black IIRC, not sure of the lettering.

I have my Dad's BLUEJACKET'S MANUAL (10th Ed, 1940) and it illustrates and provides color coding for NAVY projectiles of that period. Includes a fold-out color plate that shows a cut-away of a 3" Shrapnel round, just like Mr. Metaka's.

Codes as follows (p.525):
Black - armor piercing
Slate - common (BP burster at that point in time)
White - Shrapnel
Unpainted - Target Practice
Yellow - Explosive D burster
Red - Gas
Green - Anti-aircraft and bombardment
Rounds with tracer had a white band

Inside the front cover, Dad noted in red ink "July 23, 1942", which was his wedding day; then in black ink his name; "Seaman S/C V-6"; "U.S.N.R.A.B."; "Dallas, Texas"; and then, again in red ink, "Discharged: Nov 30, 1945". It is to be noted that that particular book will NOT be leaving my possession any time soon, though i suppose at some point I willl need to pass it to my nephew (Dad's grandson).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,896 Posts
In reference to the army terminology, a 75mm shell was used to refer to the low velocity 75L38 guns on early war Shermans. They also developed a high velocity anti-tank gun based on the Navy's 3' AA gun. This was referred to as a 76mm (76L54) to avoid confusion and was used on late war Shermans and M-10 Wolverine tank destroyers
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top