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I'm not talking about sporterizing now or recently. I'm talking about the rifles that were sporterized back in the 20's, 30's, and 40's, mabey even early 50's. The kind that were done with fairly high quality. If they were scoped they usually had a fixed 2 or 4 power steel tube scope.

I recently had a weakness for a sporterized 30-40 Krag with a very old Williams scope mount and very old weaver fixed 4 power scope, nice wood, with worn blueing. I got it for $100 and was happy.

I have a couple buddies that have older sporterized rifles. One is a Mk1#3 enfield and the other is a 1903 springfield. Both were done along time ago and were done very nice.

It is frustrating to me when I see a rifle that this has been done to, but after a few minutes I try to appriciate how well it was done if it was done a long time ago.

I don't know if these types of rifles have any collectability but I still have a weak spot for rifles like this krag. I've got plenty of regular hunting rifles and don't really need any sporterized military rifles though.

What do you fellas think about rifles that fit this bill?

MikeP
 

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I have a cut-down Krag rifle which I purchased many years ago and was the second milsurp I ever owned. This one was done in the manner of the Bannerman's or at least similar although I have no provenance for this. I like it for what it is and I believe that many of these sporterized specimens retain at least an air of desireability or collectability. Best wishes. Dave
 

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seen some real classics

krags with flush mags:cool:, Springfield's engraved:), Mauser's light as 5 lbs:D, express sights, peep sights, German scopes, claw mounts sculptured barrels, etc. with fit/finish/checkering :cool:. owned a few. sold them all :eek:.
i didn't cut them up but, they have a place in time that's acceptable as a part of history that is just as inportant as the purists keeping them org.:eek:<><dk
 

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I have a few nicely-done pre WW2 Mosin sporters; all are Remingtons. One is certainly a commercial rework, complete with a Lyman #36 rear sight and commercial stock, one is similar but an amateur job, but also with aperture sights on the cocking piece. A third seems to be done in the style of the 1927-28 National Rifleman MN article, is a dead ringer for the rifle in the article, and is in brand new condition; clearly an un-issued Remington was used. A fourth rifle is one of the converted .30-06 Bannermans, and shows the poorest workmanship of the bunch.
ANY of them surpass the more modern post-import "bubba" guns I've seen lately, if you like that kinda thing, and certainly are more attractive than the plastic stockers out there.
Fajen used to make a great looking sporter stock for the MN.

Also, well, times were different before WW2. The nation was not interested in any more international conflicts, money was non-existent, and many more people lived rural lifestyles than today. Commercial sporting rifles were extremely expensive for the average hunter. The abundant WW1 surplus rifles were not considered collectible by most shooters--but were seen as cheap tools to put meat on the table. This was a big deal during the depression.
It's not fair to judge the actions of depression-era hunters against today's huge surplus and relatively inexpensive commercial sporting gun market. We see these as collectibles now, 90-100 years after the war, but in 1929 they were not so much.
 
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