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I dropped this question at another forum, so I thought I'd ask here too. I have a Winchester Defender 1300 shotgun that I am thinking about covering with a new finish. I am after something flat looking in finish and durable. It is currently blued, and shows every little ding and nick...I use this as a home defense gun and would like to have a more durable finish for this one.

Any suggestions on products, even do-it-yourself would be entertained. Any pics of your guns?

thanks for any help in advance! Dave
 

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Brownells ALUMA-HYDE® II. Takes what seems like forever to dry. Very durable. I have used it on a couple of AK's.
http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=1117/Product/ALUMA_HYDE_reg__II

I have also used Krylon spray paint. Very simple and any wear spots can be touched up fast. Holds up good. You will see krylon on alot of AR's including those in military usage.
Google it. Take a look at my web page the M44 has Krylon.
 

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Most of the commercial finishes are variations on the epoxy or polymer finishes. These are offered by a number of re-finisher services and come in many colors and levels of gloss.

For do-it-at-home, most are variations on epoxy paints, ranging from Brownell's Aluma-Hyde I and II to Lauer Duracoat.
Some require baking in a kitchen oven, some are air hardening. The air hardening types are usually hard enough to handle lightly in 24 hours, can be used in a day or so, but reach full hardness in 2 to 3 weeks.
Some of these are very tough, durable finishes.
How well they look and stand up depends on how good a job you do in cleaning the metal and applying the finish.
Most of these work best on metal that's been bead blasted to give the finish a "tooth" to bond to.

Here's some finishes for doing the job at home:

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/cid=0/k=alumahyde/t=P/ksubmit=y/Products/All/search=alumahyde
Alumahyde I is baked in the oven II is air hardening. You can get it in a spray can or as a liquid for air brush. Airbrush application works best and looks neater. This is a one part product.

http://www.lauerweaponry.com/
Lauer Duracoat is one of the very best. It's a two-part product that has to be mixed and has to be sprayed with an airbrush. Lauer sells a cheap airbrush set to do the job. Duracoat is air hardening and comes in almost any color and level of gloss you could want.
It's an extremely tough finish, and removal usually requires bead blasting it off.

For professional gun coatings here's some refinishing services. They all do a very good job and the finishes are tough and durable. They'll almost always bead blast the old finish off to give the surface a good base for adhesion.
Many offer a number of gun finishes, from bluing to hard chrome to the "paint" type epoxy or polymer finishes. Check out the sites to see everything they offer.

http://www.fordsguns.com/

http://www.apwcogan.com/
(Probably the best gun finisher in business).

http://www.robarguns.com/

There are no doubt more, but these are the best and most reliable.
 

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Depending on your level of impatience, either Duracoat or AlumaHyde will give you a durable finish.

Bake the Duracoat and have a quickly available finish.

Or spray on the Brownell's finish and let it sit unmolested for about a month to fully cure. Resist the temptation to handle it any sooner, or fit poarts together just to see what they will look like when the finish id fully cured.

I like the variety of AlumaHyde finishes. The gray Park does a great job for refinishing beat & worn Viet Nam era AR mags, and the matte black is great for finishing stainless barrels when you want to eliminate that s/s glare.
 
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