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I keep running into milsurps that have been deactivated by welding the chamber closed and other mischief. I am now convinced that the welding heat not only damages the chamber but changes the heat treat of other parts not directed subjected to the actually weld. Been attempting to convert an early k98 mauser to a full size .22 "trainer" by reaming out the barrel. The welding hardened the barrel so much even a carbide bit couldn't cut it. Finally had to "heat treat the barrel to soften the weld metal so the pilot drill could get through it. Even then I had to use a boring bar to recenter the chamber end as the weld still forced the bit slightly off center. Even the receiver ring seems way too hard even though it appears perfect in every way. Just a heads up if you ever have to deal with similar situation.
 

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Oh, man.

That brings back memories. I never did trust a receiver ring for full pressure loads after such doin's. Sure turned out a lot of .22 Hornet, .25-20 and .32-20 on such actions, though. Mausers were the worst. Especially the M.93s.:cool:
 

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I've seen many deactivated/demilitarized military rifles by putting some "drops" of an "electric welding rod" in the chamber. I've seen them restored and shot but I never had the guts to shoot them myself. Why? I care about my eyes and my fingers. I think it is an unwise thing to do. Changing to a milder caliber is something else.
 

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If you are changing the barrel you can get the receiver recarborized (heat treated). A lot of gunsmihs have it done as a prerequisite.

Rad
 

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If you are changing the barrel you can get the receiver recarborized (heat treated). A lot of gunsmihs have it done as a prerequisite.

Rad
Very, very dangerous. A little too hard and it'll become brittle and liable to blow a la early number 03 Springfields. This heat treating used to be popular with older gunsmiths who thought that most any milsurp was "too soft" but thankfully most wont try today for fear of lawsuits.
Modern practice is to leave the receiver fairly soft and just surface harden the bearing surfaces. This makes it much more resistant to fatigue and overpressures.
 

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jjk308

Modern practice is to leave the receiver fairly soft and just surface harden the bearing surfaces. This makes it much more resistant to fatigue and overpressures.
That is what the recarborization process is, sort of a case harding. There are a couple of heattreaters that do this.

Rad
 
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