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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello and thanks for the interest.

Recently I purchased a Webley mark 6. It's a nice piece, however when I got it home I found that with little effort I can turn the cylinder while the gun is in the closed position and the barrel not down in the loading position.

Is this normal for this revolver or should the cylinder be unmovable? What would be the cause if it's not supposed to turn?????

Any opinions??

Dan
 

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This is not normal to a Webley, for the cylinder is locked into battery by the cylinder stop (a bump on the rear of the trigger) and the trigger stop. The cylinder does not spin at battery, as that would misalign the cylinder and barrel. Sounds as if your trigger stop is badly worn, missing its spring or assembled wrong. Once the cylinder is in battery, the lock-up may be a little sloppy, but, like a Colt revolver, the pawl (hand) usually tightens it up before the firing pin hits the primer.
 

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There is only a small projection that keeps it from turning, if it requires any force, it is ok.

But don't do that, you will make it worse!
 

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This is not normal to a Webley, for the cylinder is locked into battery by the cylinder stop (a bump on the rear of the trigger) and the trigger stop. The cylinder does not spin at battery, as that would misalign the cylinder and barrel. Sounds as if your trigger stop is badly worn, missing its spring or assembled wrong. Once the cylinder is in battery, the lock-up may be a little sloppy, but, like a Colt revolver, the pawl (hand) usually tightens it up before the firing pin hits the primer.
Ward is correct in saying that your trigger stop is at fault, but misleading in the comment about the lock-up. When the action is at rest (uncocked) the bump on the rear of the trigger is down in the frame and all that stops the cylinder rotating is the spring loaded trigger stop. The rectangular slots in the cylinder are wider than the trigger stop so there is some rotational slop; this is of no consequence. When the trigger is pulled to the rear the bump on it rises up and enters the grooves around the rear periphery of the cylinder. It is then, as Ward says, that the pawl pushes the cylinder around until the bump is hard up against the end of the groove. There should then be no, or at most very little, rotational movement possible. The "wobbly Webley" saying originates with people who do not understand that some slop when uncocked is not a fault, as it would be with an American action revolver with a cylinder bolt, eg a S&W.

What frequently happens is that the trigger stop fails to fully retract when the action is at rest (usually due to dirt), and a drag line results as the cylinder turns. Idiot owners then file the stop down in situ and the result is just what you have Dan.

I suggest that you look closely at the top of the trigger stop. If it is flat (front to rear) rather than slightly curved then it has been filed. If OK then strip and clean the revolver and all should be well.

Peter
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Many thanks to all who have come to my aid. It appears as if the trigger stop in the problem. I have looked at it closely. I really can't tell if it is just worn or if some one has filed it. The front half of the trigger stop, towards the muzzle, has no finish on it. The rear half of the stop has finish on it.

A couple more questions. Do any of you know where I can get another trigger? Is it a difficult project to replace the trigger, or if I find a trigger should I take it to a gunsmith?? I'll probably never shoot the gun, but want one that works as it should.

Thanks again. Dan
 

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The trigger stop is a separate piece and so a new trigger is not required. If the top of the stop is flat and parallel to the body then it has been filed. If the top is slightly convex when seen from the side then it is original. Given that it still has some finish then it is probably original. I can give you the original instructions on how to adjust the stop, but first strip the trigger out of the revolver and ensure that the stop is clean and free to move when pushed up and down.

Peter
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Peter

Ok, So the trigger stop is not part of the trigger. So I don't need a trigger. Iam so afraid to start taking it apart as with my luck parts will go flying out and I'll not see how they go back together. But I shall try.

In order to remove the trigger will I have to remove the trigger guard first, and then the screw on the left side directly above the trigger? Will the trigger come out easily or is it spring loaded and come flying out? If the trigger comes out nicely without issues. Does this allow me to access the trigger stop to see if it is clean and moves???/

Dan
 

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Not quite that simple Dan, but nothing will fly out! To remove the trigger you must remove most of the action bits and pieces. Take off the stock plates (grips) and ease the mainspring out; you can do this without using pliers, but they may help. Then remove the mainspring auxillary ("lever, spring, main") which is the lever that the mainspring rested on. Now remove the trigger guard and then the trigger pivot screw. Pull the trigger down and it will come out with the pawl attached. Excluding the little flat spring (which is retained by a screw) on the trigger which controls the stop, the mainspring is the only spring in the action. By resting on the auxillary the mainspring also acts as the trigger return spring.

Putting it back together can be a bit of a fiddle, but there is really nothing to it. I can refit the mainspring without using pliers, but usually have to have several trys at getting the hook on the spring to catch the stirup on the hammer. Now a S&W action is not so straightforward!

Peter
 

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I would not mess with it; it is not broken; especially if you "never may shoot it".
Cleaning and lube may just make it a little better.
 
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