Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Howdy folks! I could use some help here.

Picked this revolver up today from my LGS. Looks to be a late WWII Commercial Webley IV, but I'm not an expert on these things by any means, and the markings dont tell me much. They dont say Webley or Enfield anywhere.

Any british revolver experts around that can tell me a little more about this piece?

(This is in fact an Enfield No2Mk1 revolver. I was very off in my identification. Thanks for the correction and information!)

3809322

3809323

3809324

3809325
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
882 Posts
Enfield no. 2 Mark 1** military revolver; its manufacture date is shown on the barrel rib. It was sold out of military service so also bears Birmingham commercial proofs. An “L” in the private view mark in front of the holster guide corresponds with 1960. You might enjoy the book Stamps and Skennerton, .380 Enfield No. 2 Revolver, which costs less than a box of cartridges.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I clearly misidentified this revolver, which goes to show how little I know about them. Thank you all for the clarification! I paid about $350 for this guy, so thankfully I didnt overpay much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
Identical twin to the one I picked up a couple of years ago. The guy I got it from had no interest in it whatsoever and sold it to me for $150 with the original British web belt and holster along with a handful of US commercial ammo. Mine shows a manufacture date of 1949.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
Chambered for the 380/200 cartridge which shares a case with the 38S&W round. Commercial 38S&W ammo will work just fine but won't shoot to point of aim because of bullet weight difference. 38S&W commercial is mostly loaded with a 148 grain bullet and moderate charges because of the number of turn-of-the-20th century revolvers still around in this caliber. 380/200 started with a 200 grain lead bullet later replaced with a 174 grain jacketed projectile. If you reload there are molds for 200 grain bullets which work nicely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I was looking at Gunbroker pricing (for a commercial webley with bobbed spur) and I figured anywhere from $3-400 was a decent price, so I made him an offer of $350 and everyone was happy.

Im glad I was still on the money even when misidentifying it ha.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
They're called tankers because of some myth surrounding the hammer catching on hatches and holsters.

The reality is that's its a manufacturing simplification that has nothing related to tanks.

Theres no documented connection to tankers, tank crews, or the like, that Ive been able to find in my research the last week ha.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
The book I referenced in your other post comments at length that the hammer bob (and accompanying lightening of the trigger pull) was indeed in response to a request of the Royal Tank Corps - which was the largest user of pistols for common soldiers in the British Army.
Apparently the complaint originated with the initial trials with 20 No. 2 Mk. 1s (with hammer spur) in 1930, but the alteration was only approved and implemented in 1939.

See pages 45 & 46 - also 49-51, which contain the text of the change orders involved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
Note that the initial change did not simplify production - it consisted of bobbing the hammer, replacing the hammer spring with a lighter one, and installing improved grips that allowed a firmer hold and better control during trigger pull for DAO firing (with the hammer spur it was a SA/DA revolver, and firing drill emphasized SA as the preferred mode). That was the No. 2 Mk. 1*.

Later, the safety stop and machining for it were deleted in order to simplify production - that was the No. 2 Mk. 1**.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Actually there was a complete change around 1939 in doctrine on the use of the pistol. Standing shooting single action aimed shots was out and two quick shots "by sense of direction" came in. In other words DA and instinctive aiming. It was (finally?) recognised that the revolver was a last ditch up-close weapon.

Peter
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top