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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guys.

What is the significance of Matching Numbers on a VZ-24. I get that a matched bolt means that you're probably not going to see head spacing issues. But is there other significance? What about the receiver markings. Why is a Lion Crest more desirable then say, a simple 1934 marking or a scrubbed receiver?
 

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matching numbers on the bolt and receiver indicates that the bolt is the original supplied with the rifle (unless it's a re-numbered bolt). since a matching numbers piece is much less common than M/Med examples,collectors pay more. in the case of the Czech VZ24 rifles,most work fine with M/Med bolts,as long as the M/Med bolt is also of VZ24 mfg. sooooo,in the end what the situation creates is a huge difference in value between similar items,simply caused by an example of collector demand. the rifles with all matching #s are sought by collectors because they are more desirable and thus better investments,with the greatest chance to increase in value as well. the Vz24s that have the Lion crest are sought simply because its a really noticeable mark,and again,not as available as others. what we're seeing here is market demand in the collector situation. all the vz24 rifles are of equal quality,functionally.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
matching numbers on the bolt and receiver indicates that the bolt is the original supplied with the rifle (unless it's a re-numbered bolt). since a matching numbers piece is much less common than M/Med examples,collectors pay more. in the case of the Czech VZ24 rifles,most work fine with M/Med bolts,as long as the M/Med bolt is also of VZ24 mfg. sooooo,in the end what the situation creates is a huge difference in value between similar items,simply caused by an example of collector demand. the rifles with all matching #s are sought by collectors because they are more desirable and thus better investments,with the greatest chance to increase in value as well. the Vz24s that have the Lion crest are sought simply because its a really noticeable mark,and again,not as available as others. what we're seeing here is market demand in the collector situation. all the vz24 rifles are of equal quality,functionally.
Thanks for the awesome feedback. Is there a way to check to see if the bolt has been "re-numbered"? Also how common is it to have a bolt that matches the receiver, but a barrel that is not original?
 

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very seldom will you see matched receiver and bolt with a re-barrel;most pieces that have been re-barreled will have also gone through a complete arsenal rework at the same time as the re-barrel process. this is usually called the "scrubbed" process. regarding re-numbered bolts;this takes you into the minefield of faked turds. you have to be extremely diligent and experienced with what you are dealing. usually,the number appearance,"the font" can be verified to be the same on the receiver and bolt. BUT, some fakers are very good at this type of work. the good ones can make alot of profit at this process. i don't have much interest in expensive matching numbered pieces because i'm not an experienced collector and feel unsure about being able to recognize a high quality faked re-numbered item. you could easily buy a 4 or 5 thousand dollar item and later find out that it's a turd worth less than half what you paid for it. OUCH!!!!! faked,re-numbered items in the collector firearms group is more common than most people realize.sadly,it's usually the newest people to the hobby that get badly burnt.it's not hard to realize why this happens. a good faker can take a 4 or 5 hundred dollar piece and sell it for a thousand or twelve hundred after re-numbering. $500 profit for a couple hours work?? pretty good wages. so anyone buying firearms as collectors items needs to be careful and hesitant and research enough to be sure what you are looking at and considering buying hasn't been "doctered". the latin term for this is caveat emptor,"buyer beware"
 

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You are saying that all renumbered parts are fake? Not so, in fact they are a minority if not rare. These riles had arts renumbered at overhaul, especially by the Germans & Romanians. Just try and hand stamp those hardened parts some time!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Frosty and lornedavis for the information.

I got to take a really close look today and the whole thing is matching. Stock (though beat up with a broken front band spring), barrel, receiver and bolt all share matching numbers. Don't know if it's all fake or not but for $300.00 it's not a huge loss if it's counterfeit. Also found a new marking, it says something in a triangle about Nicaragua.

Really interesting piece.
 

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$300 is a steal for a matching Nicaraguan VZ24. You get the steal of the week award!
 

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if Bill says its so,then it is!!
If the OP posts photos showing it is both Nicaraguan and matching, then it is. No photos and it never happened.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
lol. Ha ha. Thanks guys you're making me feel bettter and better about this acquisition every day!

I've got her torn apart right now to start the decosmo operations but I'll get her back together and snap a few pics tonight.

Its got a broken front band spring. Any of you have any experience in fixing this type of problem? Im
having a hard time getting the thing out
 

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Take a small diameter steel punch and put it in the hole on the opposite side of the stock from the front band spring. You should be able to tap the spring out enough to get a grip on it and pull it out.

The pin part of the band spring that goes through the stock may be severely rusted. It that is the case you will need to get under the remaining part of the band spring and pry upward. Once the spring is out, run a punch or stiff wire through the hole going through the stock to clean it out. Go from the left side to the right. Try not to enlarge the hole or the new band spring will be loose (but still held in place by the front band).

Numrich Gun Parts, Springfield Sporters, SARCO, and maybe Liberty Tree Collectors should have band springs.

The best photos are made outside in open shade or under overcast - with a medium shade neutral background.
 

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Yours looks good enough to me. Photos of the bolt, receiver, and stock serial numbers would support the 'matching' claim.

A photo of the crest area on the top of the receiver ring would be interesting. Some were blank and some had sloppy concentric circles added, I think, in Nicaragua.

The 1937 contract was for only 1,000 rifles. Good find!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yours looks good enough to me. Photos of the bolt, receiver, and stock serial numbers would support the 'matching' claim.

A photo of the crest area on the top of the receiver ring would be interesting. Some were blank and some had sloppy concentric circles added, I think, in Nicaragua.

The 1937 contract was for only 1,000 rifles. Good find!
Thanks for the comments and positive remarks!

Whenever I've seen photos of people's firearms, whether in forums, classifieds, etc. they always leave out or blur their serial numbers. I've always wondered why, but have followed suit in an abundance of caution. Anyone know why this seems to be common practice?

On another note, I followed your advice and also used a little PB Blaster and managed to get my broken front band spring off. New one is on the way. I've also noticed that it's missing one of the capture/lock screws in the trigger guard. I cant seem to find anyone that has any VZ 24 replacements in stock. Any of you fine folks know where I might source one?
 

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that's a really good example of a scarce VZ24. the best part about it is that nothing has been cleaned incorrectly. if you are new into the milsurp field of collecting,do not make the common error of sanding the wood stock. also,if you are a new collector,it will take a few years for you to realize how lucky you are to stumble upon a rare item like this.cheers.
 

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Thanks for the comments and positive remarks!

Whenever I've seen photos of people's firearms, whether in forums, classifieds, etc. they always leave out or blur their serial numbers. I've always wondered why, but have followed suit in an abundance of caution. Anyone know why this seems to be common practice?

On another note, I followed your advice and also used a little PB Blaster and managed to get my broken front band spring off. New one is on the way. I've also noticed that it's missing one of the capture/lock screws in the trigger guard. I cant seem to find anyone that has any VZ 24 replacements in stock. Any of you fine folks know where I might source one?
Serial numbers are not "always" hidden. Some people cover or blur the serial numbers in photos. Why? Because they are paranoid? Because they saw others doing it? I have a very large quantity of photos on Gunboards (see my signature) and I have never seen the need to hide a serial number. Quite the opposite; serial numbers are very often useful to help determine the history of a gun. You don't normally see serial numbers hidden on online auctions either.

Serial numbers are often faked. Photos show that.

VZ24 lock screws are the same as Mauser G98, K98k, etc. The usual sources (see post #12) may have them or may have reproduction screws. FN and Yugo lock screws are different.
 
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