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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here are a couple pictures from the Overlord Museum in Colleville-sur-Mer France that I thought might be of interest to the armor crowd here. Being a World of Tanks player I was thrilled at the opportunity to get up close to some actual tanks for the first time during a quick trip to France.

Here is an M4 with some dings from rifle fire on the side. There seems to be a number of variants of the M4, different manufacturers and different cast vs. welded components.There is one inside the museum as well that was a different model.

M10 tank destroyer. The sign said these were sort of ok tank destroyers, but they could be made relatively quickly. This is the Wolverine in WOT.



There was no sign for this one, a self propelled gun of some type. Maybe someone here recognizes it. The Overlord Museum is well done with some really interesting stuff inside. Worth a stop if you are in the neighborhood.
 

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I had a tank come crashing into my position from the rear at JRTC once. Never mind that it was a simulated defense in a safe training environment with no danger, and the tank itself was only a small one; there was something viscerally, deeply scary knowing that thing was "coming after me." For a moment or two there, all I felt like doing was sprinting into the Louisiana woods.

I can't imagine how terrified I'd feel going up against one for real if I was dismounted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Day 2 of actual tank viewing was at the Musée des Blindés in Saumur. An incredible museum of restored tanks and a bunch awaiting restoration in the parking lot. A few highlights:


M41 Bulldog, nemesis of the heavies in WOT.

This looks like a T72 that has seen better days.

An AMX13.



While the WWII era collection was robust, there were relatively few Soviet tanks from that timeframe. Presumably not a lot of them left. A SU-100 and broken KV-1 were neat to see.


There were a number of displays of battle damaged tanks, some scarred without penetrating hits and others badly damaged. Note the projectile lodged in the armor.
 

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Last one in the second batch is a Jagpanzer 4 Alkett. Basically a panzer 4 hull with the superstructure of a Jagpanzer 4 bolted on top of it. It was taller than a regular Jpz 4 but they were desperate and had the parts lying around so...
 

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Last one in the second batch is a Jagpanzer 4 Alkett. Basically a panzer 4 hull with the superstructure of a Jagpanzer 4 bolted on top of it. It was taller than a regular Jpz 4 but they were desperate and had the parts lying around so...
Wouldn't have wanted to have been inside that one when it got decommissioned.
 

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SPG isn't an M7. It's a Sexton. British 25 PDR vice 105mm howitzer and no pulpit. Also note muzzle brake.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sexton_(artillery)

Most British-built SPG that were mobile field artillery were named after ecclesiastical persons.

See - A British self-propelled gun armed with the Ordnance QF 25-pounder in design from 1941 was nicknamed "Bishop" as its appearance was said to resemble a bishop's mitre. A replacement, the US 105 mm Howitzer Motor Carriage M7, was called "the Priest" by the British, as part of its superstructure was said to resemble a priest's pulpit. Following this line of names, a 1942 self-propelled gun armed with the QF 6 pounder was named "Deacon", and a 1943 carrier weapon with the QF 25-pounder was called "Sexton".

The last 105mm SPG in British service was the "Abbot", but its bigger successor, the 155mm AS90, doesn't have a name.

The one and only SP 17pdr anti-tank gun, "Archer", was based on the Valentine tank chassis, and was, AFAIK, the only SP gun of any form that drove with the main armament pointing backwards.

tac
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Most British-built SPG that were mobile field artillery were named after ecclesiastical persons.

See - A British self-propelled gun armed with the Ordnance QF 25-pounder in design from 1941 was nicknamed "Bishop" as its appearance was said to resemble a bishop's mitre. A replacement, the US 105 mm Howitzer Motor Carriage M7, was called "the Priest" by the British, as part of its superstructure was said to resemble a priest's pulpit. Following this line of names, a 1942 self-propelled gun armed with the QF 6 pounder was named "Deacon", and a 1943 carrier weapon with the QF 25-pounder was called "Sexton".

The last 105mm SPG in British service was the "Abbot", but its bigger successor, the 155mm AS90, doesn't have a name.

The one and only SP 17pdr anti-tank gun, "Archer", was based on the Valentine tank chassis, and was, AFAIK, the only SP gun of any form that drove with the main armament pointing backwards.

tac
Great information, thanks for the ID and explanation!
 
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