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Medal of Honor.

Medal of Honor.


Description

Lieutenant Audie Murphy, studio portrait, wearing the Medal of Honor. Murphy is credited with being the most highly decorated US combat soldier of WW2. Apart from the Medal of Honor, he was awarded two Silver Stars, Distinguished Service Cross, two Bronze Stars, three Purple Hearts, both French and Belgian Croix de Guerre, and was inducted into the French Legion d'Honneur. Just the highlights.

Coming from a poor, sharecropping background in Texas, Audie Murphy really found his metier in the Army, and in the war. He was an extremely formidable individual fighter as well as an effective junior officer, showing on occasions courage bordering on berserker fearlessness - not something I would say about many. Postwar, he suffered severe depression and other mental problems, almost certainly contributed to by post-traumatic stress disorder. Nonetheless, he battled these problems with typical determination, and developed a successful Hollywood career, notably in war movies and Westerns. He died in an aeroplane crash in 1971, and was honoured with burial at Arlington National Cemetery, with full military honours. Best regards, JR.


Recent comments
  • Hammer (Sun 23 Jun 2013 07:37:16 PM EDT)
    Raised near Greenville, Tx & yes his family was typical of those blackland farmers....poor.
 

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Battle of the Bulge

Battle of the Bulge


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A rifleman, a machine gunner and tanks of the 4th Armored fight to hold open the corridor to Bastogne against counterattacking Germans. A tanker said that the corridor was "so narrow you can spit across it.'
 

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Boobytrap

Boobytrap


Description

An American soldier lies dead beside the villagewater pump, killed by a German booby trap set in the pump in a French village on the Cherbourg Peninsula, on June 18, 1944. (AP Photo/Peter Carroll)
 

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Snow camo

Snow camo


Description

During the Battle of the Bulge (Dec 1944), allied soldiers decorated their helmets with lace curtains, after realizing it provided excellent camouflage in the snow.




Recent comments
  • GarM1and (Thu 05 Dec 2013 08:24:04 PM EST)
    show summary
    I know an old WW2 vet who fought during the Battle of the Bulge. He said the Belgian locals gave the American troops the white sheets off their beds to use as snow camo. He also said that the German SS in their white snow uniforms were darn near impossible to see, he said it was like trying to aim at a ghost.
 

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Mortar hit

Mortar hit


Description

Infantrymen move along a road through Beffe, Belgium, which the jeep at right was hit by a German mortar shell,Belgium January 5, 1945
 

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2nd ID move up

2nd ID move up


Description

Infantrymen of the 2nd Division move up towards Krinkelt, Belgium. The orange circles painted on the back of their snow capes are for identification. January 31, 1945(rudeerude)
 

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Mildred Dalton " Angel of Corregidor"

Mildred Dalton


Description

Mildred Dalton was one of 66 Army nurses taken captivity by the Japanese after the American's final outpost on the island of Corregidor fell in May 1942.


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  • ThunderboltFan (Mon 11 Mar 2013 01:27:53 AM EDT)
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    Here is an extract from the NY Times article, 10 March 2013:
    A total of 66 Army nurses were taken into captivity by the Japanese after the Americans’ final outpost, on the island of Corregidor, fell in May 1942. They spent most of the war under guard at Japan’s Santo Tomas internment camp for foreign nationals in Manila, where they faced near-starvation and were ravaged by disease and malnutrition while treating nearly 4,000 men, women and children.

    When Mrs. Mildred Dalton Manning died on Friday in Hopewell, N.J., aged 98, she was the last survivor of the Army and Navy nurses who had been captured by the Japanese in the Philippines.....
 

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Lt. Gen. Buckner

Lt. Gen. Buckner


Description

Lieutenant-General Simon Bolivar Buckner (1886-1945) right, commander of U.S. Tenth Army on Okinawa. - On June 18 he was at a forward observation post when he was hit in the chest by a fragment of shrapnel thrown up by a Japanese shell explosion. He died shortly afterwards. He was buried in Okinawa, but four years after the war his body was transported to the family grave in Kentucky.


Recent comments
  • Mike Geiger (Sun 23 Jun 2013 08:44:30 PM EDT)
    It was his father, not his grandfather who was a Confederate Lt. General. Simon Bolivar Buckner Sr. IIRC his father was in his early sixties when Jr. was born.
  • Hammer (Sun 23 Jun 2013 07:56:11 PM EDT)
    His Grand Father was a Confederate Officer
 

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I do not remember what year it was but I was on Okinawa from Dec 1961 to Oct 1965, and sometime during that period, some dependent boy found LTG Buckner's dog tags, and they were on display in the museum next to the Sukiran PX. John
 

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Medal of Honor.

Medal of Honor.


Description

Lieutenant Audie Murphy, studio portrait, wearing the Medal of Honor. Murphy is credited with being the most highly decorated US combat soldier of WW2. Apart from the Medal of Honor, he was awarded two Silver Stars, Distinguished Service Cross, two Bronze Stars, three Purple Hearts, both French and Belgian Croix de Guerre, and was inducted into the French Legion d'Honneur. Just the highlights.

Coming from a poor, sharecropping background in Texas, Audie Murphy really found his metier in the Army, and in the war. He was an extremely formidable individual fighter as well as an effective junior officer, showing on occasions courage bordering on berserker fearlessness - not something I would say about many. Postwar, he suffered severe depression and other mental problems, almost certainly contributed to by post-traumatic stress disorder. Nonetheless, he battled these problems with typical determination, and developed a successful Hollywood career, notably in war movies and Westerns. He died in an aeroplane crash in 1971, and was honoured with burial at Arlington National Cemetery, with full military honours. Best regards, JR.


Recent comments
  • Hammer (Sun 23 Jun 2013 07:37:16 PM EDT)
    Raised near Greenville, Tx & yes his family was typical of those blackland farmers....poor.
Apparently LT Murphey wasn't all that well liked as a unit commander. Almost insanely brave and took his men to places they didn't really want to go that much. He came home badly injured, physically which he pretty well recovered from, and emotionally which I doubt he ever completely recovered from. Not least because the problems of PTSD were not recognized nor understood. And not least because Major (as he became) Murphey didn't understand - or probably want to understand - them.

He should have been retained on active duty, had his education completed and sent to a good college (maybe Texas A&M, they had a lot of vets completing interrupted educations in those days) via Bootstrap and made good use of his talents and leadership abilities. He'd have made a pretty good infantry battalion commander in Korea...
 

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Friendly fire incident

Friendly fire incident


Description

American position, accidentally bombed by their own planes.

In preparation for Operation "Cobra" July 24, 1944 from 11.15 to 11.30 , B-17 and B-26 bombers of the 8th Air Force United States "carpet" bombed German positions on a front width of 6.5 km. A part of the bombs hit the U.S. positions - "friendly fire" killed 111 and injured 490 U.S. soldiers from the 30th Infantry Div. Venue District - St. Lo between Montreuil-sur-Lozon and Hébécrevon (Lower Normandy).
Time taken: 24/07/1944





Recent comments
  • Nickdfresh (Fri 08 Feb 2013 07:54:43 AM EST)
    show summary
    I guess Gen. McNair's death was rather graphic as he was dismembered and unrecognizable.

    At the risk of sounding a bit cold, it was no great loss - and perhaps even an all too rare bit of poetic justice. I don't think he was a terribly effective administrator, and was perhaps a case of the Army shuffling a senior officer into a planning position because he wasn't known as a particularly effective commander nor dynamic thinker. A lot of the criticisms levied at the U.S. Army ground forces in WWII had McNair's finger prints all over them. Not least of the which was his dogmatic adherence to The Tank Destroyer Doctrine, despite receiving a large amount of criticism of it from those actually fighting in the field. He more than anyone else hindered American tank development and delayed deployment of the M26 Pershing by at least six months, and possibly prevented it from being ready for the Normandy invasion. And while not solely responsible for it, the disastrous U.S. Army replacement system he oversaw was a near catastrophic failure and severally hindered combat effectiveness in the field...
  • Mike Geiger (Thu 07 Feb 2013 08:12:03 PM EST)
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    Lt General Lesley J. McNair. McNair commanded the Army Ground Forces in the continental U.S. McNair was there as an observer and also was being used as a decoy commander. Trying to make the Germans think that a new Army Group was being established under McNair. He was the highest ranking Army officer to be killed in action in WWII.
  • lee r christensen (Thu 07 Feb 2013 06:03:59 PM EST)
    And one Lt General!
 

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Ardennes 1945

Ardennes 1945


Description

Soldiers of the 75th Infantry Division,inspecting an abandoned German Kubelwagen Type 82 , formerly owned by the 2nd SS Panzer Division "Das Reich", in Beffe, Belgium. In the background, an American tank M4A3 (76) W Sherman.Time taken: 07/01/1945



Recent comments
  • flamethrowerguy (Thu 21 Mar 2013 09:31:18 AM EDT)
    Obviously the Central European way to write a date, hence this would be January 7, 1945.
 

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Along a high mountain road

Along a high mountain road


Description

Italian Campaign, likely late Autumn 1944: an American truck load of medical men stopped, likely because breakdown (the bonnet is open), along a high mountain road on the Northern Apennines during the approach to the Gothic Line. In the background is a Medical Battalion Collecting Station where wounded men from the front are given aid. Victor Sierra


Recent comments
  • patrick.lorent (Wed 16 Jan 2013 01:28:04 PM EST)
    show summary
    Production of the hard-bodied, double-walled WC-54 ambulance began in 1942 and ended in April 1944. At that time it was replaced by the WC-64 K.D., a "knock-down" version with wood composite walls that folded for trans-ocean shipping and a soft-top cab. A total of nearly 30,000 ambulances were acquired by the military before the end of the war. These vehicles saw action in every theater of the war, were used by allies under the Lend-Lease program, and many were converted into radio vehicles. The vehicle could carry four wounded on stretchers or six sitting on padded benches and two corpsmen rode in the front cab.

  • John Rutledge (Mon 14 Jan 2013 07:34:46 AM EST)
    Good point, TbF - the most unlikely photos can generate interesting exchanges In Here ... JR.
  • ThunderboltFan (Mon 14 Jan 2013 12:09:52 AM EST)
    From the wet patch next to the front wheel, it appears the problem is a burst radiator hose or other coolant problem rather than a vapour lock.
  • John Rutledge (Thu 10 Jan 2013 05:18:40 AM EST)
    show summary
    @Nickdfresh - the small number of "64s" was certainly a consideration. I think only about 3,000 of thes late-war vehicles were produced, and I could not give you a number as to how many might have made it to Europe (not very many, I imagine). Best regards, JR.
  • Nickdfresh (Wed 09 Jan 2013 05:46:24 PM EST)
    show summary
    JR, I think a WC54 is the most likely candidate for this ambulance, although a WC53 is certainly possible and they both look similar from a distance. I would doubt it is a WC64 based on the small number built and that being done in the last year of the war...
  • John Rutledge (Wed 09 Jan 2013 10:12:48 AM EST)
    show summary
    Thanks to your help, my friends, and with a little more digging, I have concluded that the vehicle down the hill is a Dodge WC64-type ambulance, or a preliminary variant of the Dodge 53/54 intorduced in late-1944. The WC64 was introduced early in 1945. By contrast with the WC53 in particular, the WC64 had the new, canvas-topped "military" cab which can just about be made out here, along with the drop-down awnings at the sides (very clear here). If this is actually a WC64 (rather than a late-1944 WC53/54 precursor), it might explain why the lads in the truck on the hill look so relaxed. The actual WC64 only came on stream in January, 1945; unlikely that many would have been deployed in Italy before March, 1945, by which time Luftwaffe action against US vehicles on twisty mountain roads would have been less likely. Thanks again, JR.
  • John Rutledge (Wed 09 Jan 2013 08:31:28 AM EST)
    leer - I think we are referring to the same vehicle in slightly different ways. Interesting about the vapor lock business. Thanks, JR.
  • lee r christensen (Tue 08 Jan 2013 06:45:54 PM EST)
    show summary
    Un less my old eyes are fooling me this is your standard U S Army 2 and 1/2 ton 6 x 6. Btry C 28th Inf Div a direct support 105 howitzer btry had at leasst 8 of them. Four of them towed our howitzers, mess truck, motor truck and 2 - 3 ammo trucks. They were prone to vapor lock and my guess that is what is ailing the one in the photo. But what a great view.
  • patrick.lorent (Tue 08 Jan 2013 04:52:17 PM EST)
    I think you are correct about the ambulance Jr.I'll post a photo and a site with many more photos of conversions of the WC54.Don't know how to include a photo in a comment.
  • Nickdfresh (Tue 08 Jan 2013 04:43:59 PM EST)
    I'm guessing here as it's difficult to see, but by the canopy-like slope over the passenger compartment and slightly elongated hood (or bonnet) - it looks like a Dodge WC54 Ambulance to me, JR. ..
 

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Battle of the Bulge

Battle of the Bulge


Description

A paratrooper of the 82nd Airborne Division leads a column of German prisoners past a disabled Stug IV in the Ardennes during the Battle of the Bulge.(rudeerude)
 

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A clear warning

A clear warning


Description

Italian campaign, Anzio front, 1944, an American truck, a dusty road, a sign with a well clear warning: «Slow, dust brings shell fire». The enemy is always in ambush and also a dust’s cloud can became a good reference for a sniper. Victor Sierra
 

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#8574 we had a hard bodied ex-ambulance in the UK bought as surplus post war. In 1947, crawling along in a blizzard up a long incline - vapour lock. Fortunately it was at the top of the ridge, so with help from patrons of a nearby pub, beers all round, we had about 2 miles of downhill which managed to get her going.
 

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Capt. Robert “Bobbie” E. Brown

Capt. Robert “Bobbie” E. Brown


Description

One of the hardest fights the Allies had in Europe was outside Aachen, Germany, the Battle of Crucifix Hill. The crucifix is still there, now a monument to the battle. Brown was placed in charge of Company C, with about 120 men, assigned to take the hill or die trying. The entire American force on the hill was a full regiment of about 500. They were facing an equal number of well entrenched Germans. If the hill was not taken, the Allies could not encircle Aachen. The Germans could pour down artillery on the entire town.

There were at least 43 pillboxes and bunkers, bristling with machine guns and plenty of men. Company C was assigned pillboxes 17, 18, 19, 20, 26, 29, and 30. The worst of these was 20, with a 360 degree turret on top armed with an 88 mm cannon. The walls were 6 feet of steel reinforced concrete.

After crawling 150 yards under heavy enemy fire to 18 and blowing it up with a satchel charge, Brown crawled again through heavy enemy fire, 35 yards to 19, and several mortar rounds landed around him, knocking him down. He got back up, climbed on top of the bunker and dropped a bangalore torpedo through a hole in the roof. This blew a larger hole, into which he dropped a satchel, and destroyed the emplacement.

20, however, had 45 men and 6 machine guns aimed out around it. When he returned for more demolition, his sergeant told him, “There’s bullet holes in your canteen.” He had been hit in the hip and was bleeding profusely. He crawled down a communications trench 20 yards from 19 to 20, and saw a German entering a steel door in the side. Brown was an ex-boxer, and knocked this man out with one swing, through him inside, and then threw 2 in satchel charges, and ran.

20 exploded so violently that flames flew out the top and caught a tree on fire. Brown personally led his men on a path of destruction through the rest of their assignments, and after an hour of tooth-and-nail fighting, Crucifix Hill was reduced to smoking rubble.

Brown shot himself in 1971, plagued ever since the war with bad memories and pain from his wounds.


Recent comments
  • Mike Geiger (Thu 06 Mar 2014 06:06:40 PM EST)
    He is a Medal of Honor recipient.
  • mack roberts (Thu 06 Mar 2014 05:26:12 PM EST)
    all of that should have got him a moh.
  • Hammer (Sun 23 Jun 2013 08:40:14 PM EDT)
    A REAL American hero that never escaped his physical & mental demons.
    May God give him rest & Peace.
 
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