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Soviet trench shields

Soviet trench  shields


Description

Soviet soldiers in trench with shields protecting from bullets and frags

@Carn



Recent comments
  • leccy (Thu 02 Feb 2012 01:18:30 PM EST)
    Most of the time I have seen these being used they were incorporated into defensive works as embrasures or firing loops embedded in the parapet.
    Very rarely have I seen them in use in the open like this.
  • Carn (Thu 02 Feb 2012 11:34:17 AM EST)
    I find it interesting that the man with the LMG ( on the right side of the picture) dont have such a shield
  • John Rutledge (Thu 02 Feb 2012 10:51:37 AM EST)
    Yes, a somewhat flawed concept, I should have thought. Unless, that is, you had so many riflemen that you really didn't care how many got their heads blown off by snipers ... Best regards, JR.
  • hyder (Thu 02 Feb 2012 10:46:09 AM EST)
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    My grandfather told about the time he encountered similar shields in the Winter war. Basically he said they were death traps. Whenever one was propped up it drew fire from everyone who could see it. And the man behind the shield had to elevate his head and upper body to be able to aim with his rifle. These guys made perfect targets for the fire coming from an angle since the shield only really covered the front.
 

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Captured mortar

Captured mortar


Description

German heavy siege mortar captured by Soviet soldiers. Vicinity of Leningrad, January 1943


Recent comments
  • DieGrosseSchlag (Wed 01 Feb 2012 03:26:58 AM EST)
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    Czech 305mm. mozdir vz. 16 mortar. The German designation was 30.5cm. Mrs. (t). It was originally produced in 1916 and kept in service with the Czech and Yugoslav armies. It was transported in two loads. Six of these heavy mortars were used during the German siege of Leningrad 1941-44. Shell weight: 289 kg. Rate of fire: one round every five minutes.
 

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Soviets in North Korea

Soviets in North Korea


Description

Soviet armoured forces partially occupying North Korea, August 1945.
 

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Heavy load

Heavy load


Description

Russian 280mm Br-5 Mortar Mod. 1939 ,tractor towed howitzer.
 

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Captured Royal Tiger

Captured Royal Tiger


Description

American soldiers on a captured German Royal (or King) Tiger tank.
It was lost or abandoned by the Germans on December 15, 1944, the day before the start of the Ardennes offensive (Battle of the Bulge). The tank was repaired by the American 129th battle repair battalion and put to use against the former owners.
 

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Street cleaning, Moscow.

Street cleaning, Moscow.


Description

Street cleaning detail washes away the detritus left by a mass parade of German prisioners through Moscow, ?1944. Best regards, JR.


Recent comments
  • unknownsoldier (Mon 28 Nov 2011 05:02:32 PM EST)
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    the story went that they gave the prisoners a greasy meal before the parade - and their stomachs werent up to it. They spent the parade vomiting and shitting - which the Russians used to show how theyre 'dirty invaders' - not sure who had the last laugh on this incident though - im sure the nazis, masters of propoganda, could find positives in germans shitting in the streets of moscow.
 

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Paratroopers droping fron Tupolev TB-3

Paratroopers droping fron Tupolev TB-3


Description

Soviet paratroopers droping from a tupolev TB-3


Recent comments
  • larry41 (Mon 01 Aug 2011 08:29:21 PM EDT)
    Modeler, I was thinking the same thing. Also, the pilot would have to correct for the shifting center of gravity as they climbed out the fuselage and went out over the wing and jumped/slid. What a mixed up way to get rid of your passengers.
  • MODELER2010 (Mon 01 Aug 2011 08:24:29 PM EDT)
    Seems all of them piled on the wing would cause handleing problems...
  • miguel_ortego (Mon 01 Aug 2011 05:27:34 PM EDT)
    But what about having a NKVD officer with a gun shouting you: " Jump comrade!" I'd jump!
  • miguel_ortego (Mon 01 Aug 2011 05:25:56 PM EDT)
    You bet! ELK
  • Evillittlekenny (Mon 01 Aug 2011 02:44:46 PM EDT)
    I bet this way of jumping required soem extra nerves...
 

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Evacuation of wounded by air

Evacuation of wounded by air


Description

Air Evacuation was one of the means to transfer patients from Fifth US Army Hospitals to fixed PBS medical installations in Caserta, Naples, and Rome. The aircraft were operated by the 802d + 807th Medical Air Evacuation Transport Squadrons (MAETS).
 

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US Army hospital in England

US Army hospital in England


Description


A view of the ward of the 2nd US Army Evacuation Hospital in Diddington, UK; June 3, 1943.
 

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US Army nurse

US Army nurse


Description

An American nurse stands outside the tent of the 44th Evacuation Hospital near the village of La Cambe in Normandy after her shift ends; North-western France, June-July 1944.
 

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Young German patients

Young German patients


Description

Young German soldiers are treated for their wounds by members of the US Army's 59th Evacuation Hospital. The photograph is believed to have been taken during the unit’s operations in France; 1944.
 

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T-34 obr 1941, Late Version

T-34 obr 1941, Late Version


Description

In 1941 Stalin took a gamble and moved his main T-34 plant in Kharkov to Nizhni Tagil in the Ural Mountains, effectively halting tank development while the new factory was set up and other plants were brought online. The focus on tank development was temporary taken off development and concentrated on making the T-34 quicker and easier to build.
The T-34 obr 1941 (late) is the result of simplifying the construction of the T-34, from the comparatively complex construction of the 1940 and 41 models.

Like the 1941 model the later version was armed with the F-34 76.2mm gun, and had a welded or cast single hatch turret. It did start to take on a few features that are seen in the later obr 1942 and 85mm models like the armoured hull machine gun cover and the PTK-5 periscope.
 

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ChKZ T-34 obr 1942

ChKZ T-34 obr 1942


Description

Produced by Factory No.100 at Chelyabinsk (ChKZ)

The Urals became a centre of tank production after the evacuation of the Kharkov, and parts of the Leningrad, production, and later from Stalingrad. The new tank factories were set up to take advantage of a vast tractor works built in the 1930s during collectivisation.
Equipment from the tank factory at Kirov was merged with that from Leningrad. The Ural-Kirov Tank Factory in Chelyabinsk was set-up by the People’s Commissariat for the Tank Industry to produce T-34s.

The Kharkov Locomotive Factory were moved to the Uralmashzavod (Ural Machine Building Plant) in the Urals and merged with the Nishni Tagil auto factory. The whole complex of factories around Chelybinsk became known later as Tankograd.

One of the pieces of equipment inherited from the existing industry was a huge 5,000-ton forge-press. So rather than cast or weld the new 1942 model hexagonal T-34 turret, the Chelyabinsk factory (ChKZ) simply stamped them out from the heated metal plate.

Some pressed Turrets were also used on T-34s from the Uralmash Factory at Nishni Tagil. A total 2670 of these dropforged turrets were made.


Recent comments
  • Chevan (Wed 17 Aug 2011 03:50:12 AM EDT)
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    The T-34 actualy had a THREE types of turrets - welded( the first developed in mass production), the molten and stamped. The stamped was pressed from a single 45-mm armored plate.Althought it was mre thin then the melted turret - it turned to be more strong against AT fire.
  • leccy (Sat 16 Jul 2011 12:35:22 PM EDT)
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    Never heard of drop forged turrets before on these. Looks a little odd and reminds me alot of the soviet helmets.

    How did the armour thickness compare to welded or cast types. If done in a single pressing it would thin quite alot the further down the formers went in the press.
 

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Drinking

Drinking


Description

Soviet POW's drinking water from a frozen creek,no date given
 

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Vyborg–Petrozavodsk Offensive begin 1944

Vyborg–Petrozavodsk Offensive begin 1944


Description

At the Karelian Isthmus front there were on average 120 Red Army artillery pieces for every kilometer, with up to 220 artillery pieces per kilometer on the breakthrough sector at Battle of Valkeasaari. In addition to heavy coastal artillery of the Leningrad area and the guns of the capital ships of the Baltic Fleet (Oktyabrskaya Revoluciya, Kirov, Maxim Gorky) Stavka had also assigned heavy siege artillery (280 to 305 mm) to support of the attack.




Recent comments
  • leccy (Thu 23 Jun 2011 12:26:42 PM EDT)
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    By 1944 the original KV1 had been superceeded by the KV1s and the limited number of KV85's built. The original version had a cast turret with rounded rear sides, the armour was later increased with bolt on extra armour giving the turret a very angular boxy shape.
  • Evillittlekenny (Thu 23 Jun 2011 11:02:23 AM EDT)
    Maybe another reason was their by this time weak 76mm gun? The Germans fielded more heavily armoured units than the Finns, so maybe they were used because of this more on the Northern Front than on the others?
  • John Rutledge (Thu 23 Jun 2011 10:53:53 AM EDT)
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    Yes, ELK - now I can see the second man. And yes, I think you are right about the KV-1 identification; boxy turret, rear-firing turret machine-gun, and so on. I think KV-1s were always somewhat more common on the Northern Front, if only because there ...
  • Evillittlekenny (Thu 23 Jun 2011 09:55:33 AM EDT)
    I see two soldiers. The tanks look a bit like KV-1.
  • John Rutledge (Thu 23 Jun 2011 09:39:05 AM EDT)
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    Free-flight rocket artillery; "Stalin Organs". There seems to be a soldier sheltering behind a bush in the mid-foreground; well back and in cover was the best place to be when these things were fired. Any idea what the identity of the AFVs might be ? I cannot make it out with this resolution. Good 'photo, anyway. Thanks, JR.
 
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