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I-16

I-16


Description

Assemblin I-16 fighter. Obviously somewhere in West Siberia or Ural mountains.


Recent comments
  • Juha (Fri 26 Oct 2012 03:16:49 PM EDT)
    Powerful motor anyway - and nickname RATA (spanish
    civil war)
  • Chevan (Sun 29 Apr 2012 01:04:07 AM EDT)
    It was't so hard to fly compared to more new speedy fighters, but its engine made a lot of troubles for pilot.
  • manteau (Sat 28 Apr 2012 08:08:18 PM EDT)
    One of the most difficult aircraft to fly. Even the most experienced pilots had trouble with it. Hence the nickname, "mule".
 

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Well stocked with water in the desert

Well stocked with water in the desert


Description

Afrika Korps soldiers with a Panzer 3 tank stocked with jerry cans full of water.
 

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On to the capital of the USSR

On to the capital of the USSR


Description

Tanks Pz.Kpfw. III (right) and semi-tracked tractors Sd.Kfz. 10 (left) of the 2nd Panzerdivison of the Wehrmacht, during the offensive on Moscow, USSR: October 1941.
 

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P-39s in Russia

P-39s in Russia


Description

Airacobras for russia, 'Lend and Lease'


Recent comments
  • Mike Geiger (Thu 01 Mar 2012 01:58:35 PM EST)
    show summary
    These are actually P-63 Kingcobras undergoing final inspections before being sent to Russia. Most of them were flown to Alaska where Russian pilots then flew them to Siberia. Many of the American ferry pilots were WASP'S. This picture was taken at Bell's Wheatfield plant in Niagara Falls, New York. Initial deliveries of P-63's were in October of 1943. About 2,400 were sent to the Russians by the end of the war.
  • pionier07 (Thu 01 Mar 2012 12:27:39 PM EST)
    For Russia :)
  • pionier07 (Thu 01 Mar 2012 12:18:24 PM EST)
    show summary
    Thanks for info. These men do not look soviets. They have soviets markings. In finland there is in an aviation museum a P-39 Q which had US markings and the US white star was painted over with a red star. Otherwise it was an american backround. The aircraft's number was painted by hand in the nose. I do not know if some P-39 were delivered through Iran. Many obviously were flown via Siberia. (?)
  • iginocoggi (Thu 01 Mar 2012 10:33:15 AM EST)
    This photo, doubtless beautiful, was taken in USA before the ferry to USSR. VS
 

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The P39 mentioned above by pionier07 is in the Finnish Anti Aircraft Museum. If I remember correctly it was pulled out of a marsh, and is in great shape. Looks like you could fuel it and fly it. Much bigger plane than I thought it would be and as pionier07 said, still had English writing on the fuselage. John
 

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Frozen wastes ...

Frozen wastes ...


Description

Soviet ski troops in winter camo advance across a snowy plain before Moscow, Soviet counteroffensive, December-January 1941. The tank (?BT-5) seems to be towing a Soviet Maxim machinegun. Brrr - I feel cold, just looking at it ... Best regards, JR.




Recent comments
  • John Rutledge (Fri 02 Mar 2012 01:17:46 PM EST)
    You are probably right, leccy. One other thing I noticed is that the drive wheel is on the large side for a BT. I must have a look at the T-26. Have a nice weekend. JR.
  • leccy (Wed 29 Feb 2012 02:32:48 PM EST)
    show summary
    The rear deck looks a little short for a BT series I would guess a T26 especially when couple with the angle of the top of the hull.

    BT series trackguards were typically level or sloped down at the front while the T26 sloped down from the front to the rear of the vehicle.
 

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Vast steppe...

Vast steppe...


Description

The Soviet Union, exact location and date unfortunately unknown. Still an oppressive image...




Recent comments
  • Chevan (Sat 08 Sep 2012 07:44:52 AM EDT)
    Bet this tank will be batle-ready by spring again:)
  • Nickdfresh (Sun 26 Feb 2012 10:59:54 AM EST)
    Paul, I thank you much for the link...
  • paul (Sat 25 Feb 2012 02:29:32 AM EST)
    show summary
    From


    Everything you need to know about the T34 mechanics including the drawing of the oil system. The oil was stored in 2 radiators/tanks and was drained from there.

    ENGINE LUBRICATION SYSTEM
    For the lubrication of the engine, "Avia" Oil MK and M3 is used in the summer and M3L in the winter.

    The lubrication system (Plate 17) consists of two oil radiator tanks 3, oil pump 1, oil filter 2, pressure gauge 13, two thermometers 11 and 12, and a compensating tank 9. In the latest models, oil tanks are not in the form of radiators (i.e. without cooling fins), and the change-over cock is not fitted.

    Construction of Lubrication System The oil radiator tanks These are situated in the engine compartment at the sides. Their inner surfaces (facing the engine) are fitted with laminated fins (or radiator sections) where possible. The full capacity of each tank is 57 litres. The minimum possible quantity of oil is 10 -15 litres. A dipstick is provided and is inserted in the filler plug in the oil tank. In the bottom part of the tank there is an oil filter. At the base of the filter there is a threaded drain plug 7. To remove the oil from the tank this plug should be unscrewed two or three turns - it is not necessary to unscrew it completely - and the oil will flow from the opening. The inside of the plug is adapted to take a hose for draining the oil into a vessel. The filler has a mesh filter. The top of the tank has a change-over cock the handle of which has three positions:

    1. Forwards (towards the front of the vehicle) - oil can be forced directly by the pump through the cock into the tank. 2. Backwards - radiator on. The oil is cooled to air temperature as it flows through the radiator fins and it passes into the oil tank to be taken up again into the engine. 3. To the side - the tank and radiator are shut off.

    When the engine is running the handles of the change-over cocks 5 (Plate 17) of both tanks (those which have radiators) must either be in the position "HA BAKN" (to tank) or "HA PADNATOR" (to radiator), it is forbidden to leave the handle pointing to the side.

    The junction tube 10 serves to connect both tanks to the crankcase and also to drain off oil and foam when the tanks are overfull.

    The oil pump which is fixed to the crankcase bottom half serves to force oil under pressure to the engine and to scavenge the used oil.



  • Nickdfresh (Fri 24 Feb 2012 07:51:52 AM EST)
    Thanks for the link Ostuf.

    After reading it, the T-34's engine contained almost 16 US gallons (60 litres) of motor oil! With that much, I doubt it needed changing very often if topped off...
  • Nickdfresh (Fri 24 Feb 2012 07:24:54 AM EST)
    show summary
    It is quite plausible that a number of T-34's were built without oil drain plugs, not only for the reasons listed by ThunderboltFan. A plug could probably be drilled and tapped easily at a rear machine shop if need be. Though I imagine it would have been out of sheer desperation and was in no way standard on the first, or later, T-34s as changing oil is much easier and cheaper than changing an engine!

    I'm guessing adding diesel or kerosene to oil were standard practices for especially cold starts. Probably not great for the long term viability of the engine. In any case, I've read or heard that the Germans more or less accidentally found the excellent cold-flow and cranking properties on synthetic motor oil and fuels on the Eastern Front. I imagine if Soviet operators of vehicles and AFV's might have prized German synthetic oils if captured in quantity....
  • ThunderboltFan (Fri 24 Feb 2012 02:19:54 AM EST)
    show summary
    I don't know if draining engine oil was an option. I was once told that T-34s being used post-war had to have oil-drain plugs installed because they were manufactured without one. The rationale was that by the time a tank needed its oil changed, it would probably have been destroyed or otherwise worn out anyway so why bother? Mind you, the person who told me this is a bit of a duster so I can't confirm it as fact.
 

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All That Remains...

All That Remains...


Description

...of a T-34/76, Soviet Union, 23rd of Sept, 1943.
(Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-220-0630-02A)
 

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russian front

russian front


Description

Pe-2 in action




Recent comments
  • ThunderboltFan (Wed 15 Feb 2012 11:15:39 PM EST)
    Note the open doors of the small bomb-bay in the rear of the engine nacelle.
 

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The Remains of a T-34

The Remains of a T-34


Description

Obviously it suffered a massive, catastrophic internal explosion from ammo and fuel cooking off. Location is somewhere on the Eastern Front during the "Summer of 1943" (Kursk?), I'll delete this if it is a duplicate upload.
 

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Devastation

Devastation


Description

A group of T-34 hit by artillery. One is on fire while the other suffers total destruction. The turret in the air is from a T34/76. Eastern Front 1944.
 

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T-100

T-100


Description

The T-100 was designed by a team led by N. Barykov at the Bolshevik Works Experimental Design Mechanical Section (OKMO), in Leningrad. Very few T-100s were built

@Carn


Recent comments
  • larry41 (Fri 03 Feb 2012 12:59:53 PM EST)
    Only one T 100 was produced with the design rejected. However, it's competitor, the SMK design while also rejected, a modified version of the SMK, the KV 1 was accepted and over 5000 made.larry41
 

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Big Brother

Big Brother


Description

T-35 an T-27 on parade 1930s

@Carn


Recent comments
  • John Rutledge (Thu 02 Feb 2012 11:04:04 AM EST)
    show summary
    Five-turetted monster; I think this was the only superheavy "breakthrough tank" of the interwar period to achieve combat status (more or less). Clumsy, slow and difficult to command, and mechanically incapable of shifting its 45-metric tonne weight reliably, The T-35 was, no doubt, an impressive parade vehicle between 1935 and 1939. Attempts to use in in combat in defence of Moscow in 1941 were, however, almost completely unsuccessful; the vast majority were lost due to mechanical breakdown, with transmission malfunctions to the fore. Best regards, J
 

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SU-1

SU-1


Description

Soviet SU-1 76 mm assault gun

@Carn


Recent comments
  • Evillittlekenny (Sun 25 Nov 2012 06:03:08 AM EST)
    Based on the T-26, only one was fully built and tested.
 

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BT-5 Rocket Launcher

BT-5 Rocket Launcher


Description

BT-5 Rocket Launcher prototype 1935

@Carn


Recent comments
  • patrick.lorent (Mon 29 Oct 2012 02:15:37 PM EDT)
    No problem Stara,my mistake :)
  • Nickdfresh (Mon 29 Oct 2012 02:05:26 PM EDT)
    show summary
    As far as effectiveness, while two rockets are certainly better than none in most cases, these really wouldn't get the fire concentration that Katjushas were/are known for. That's what made them so terrifying. And dedicating large numbers of tanks to compensate for this would probably greatly hinder their effectiveness and tactical deployment. In the end, I guess I'm saying that this is sort of a waste--probably why they never were produced...
  • Stara (Mon 29 Oct 2012 01:56:57 PM EDT)
    show summary
    Surry=Sorry

    And before anyone asks: Yes, the 132 mm rocket is the same as "Katjusha" rocket. This tank (second variant) would have carried 2 Katjusha rockets and a standard Katjusha truck carried 14-28 rockets. Let's talk about effectiveness...
 

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BT-5 Rocket Launcher

BT-5 Rocket Launcher


Description

BT-5 Rocket Launcher prototype 1935

@Carn


Recent comments
  • patrick.lorent (Mon 29 Oct 2012 02:15:37 PM EDT)
    No problem Stara,my mistake :)

  • Nickdfresh (Mon 29 Oct 2012 02:05:26 PM EDT)
    show summary
    As far as effectiveness, while two rockets are certainly better than none in most cases, these really wouldn't get the fire concentration that Katjushas were/are known for. That's what made them so terrifying. And dedicating large numbers of tanks to compensate for this would probably greatly hinder their effectiveness and tactical deployment. In the end, I guess I'm saying that this is sort of a waste--probably why they never were produced...

  • Stara (Mon 29 Oct 2012 01:56:57 PM EDT)
    show summary
    Surry=Sorry

    And before anyone asks: Yes, the 132 mm rocket is the same as "Katjusha" rocket. This tank (second variant) would have carried 2 Katjusha rockets and a standard Katjusha truck carried 14-28 rockets. Let's talk about effectiveness...
Well, if you want rockets on tanks, consider the T-34 (designation for the launcher assembly to be mounted on M4 Sherman, not the excellent tank developed and fielded by the Soviet beasts), used in limited numbers by US Army in WWII. 60 4.5" rockets (T34 Calliope - Wikipedia), which would likely be helpful. Or maybe just terrifying...
 

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KV1 prototype

KV1 prototype


Description

First KV tank prototype (U-0) before sending to Moscow. September 1939. Two cannons are installed in turret: 76mm L-11 and 45mm. In December 1939 before sending U-0 to 20th Heavy Tank Brigade 45mm cannon was removed.
 
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