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samurai armor

samurai armor


Description

japanese army officer using samurai armor,used only during exercises (probably)


Recent comments
  • Jorge (Sun 24 Oct 2010 05:03:49 AM EDT)
    He looks like Don Quijote de la Mancha LOL
    Saludos Jorge
  • Mike Geiger (Sat 23 Oct 2010 02:45:44 PM EDT)
    show summary
    Many years ago before e-mail, I had a Samurai type sword. I talked to a collector in Chicago about it. He told me to remove the handle and wipe the rust off with a kleenex and that there would be Japanese script on the tang (the part the handle slides onto) and to trace the script. I did this and sent it to him and he was able to date it by the color of the rust and the inscription on the handle which he said was the sword makers name. If I remember correctly, the sword was only about 100 years old. I sold him the sword because I was young and had a family to feed but I've regretted it ever since.
  • Ealdwita (Sat 23 Oct 2010 12:48:51 PM EDT)
    show summary
    This is a very interesting photo! The armour is a mid-19th.Century style known as Nanban-gusoku. It's possible that it's a family heirloom and he's proudly showing it off. The really interesting part is the sword! It's not a 'samurai-shaped' shin-gunto or katana which would be expected, but a kyo-gunto with the knuckle guard removed. I'm familiar with a similar example that belonged to a Lt. Kawachi who surrendered it in Johor Baru, Malaysia in FebruRY 1946. He maintained that it had been made by a woman (Kunishige) between 1781-1800. Dating the photo from the age of the car in the background and the officer's rank, I'm sure it's not the same weapon.
 

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japanese imperial navy

japanese imperial navy


Description

japanese battleship crew during exercises


Recent comments
  • Taigaro (Fri 05 Mar 2010 03:11:03 AM EST)
    they are traininig "JUKENJUTSU" juken=rifle with bayonet, jutsu=war. They have an armour called "BOGU" similar at the KENDO with a protection for shoulder and a "MOKUJU" represent a rifle but entirely wood and finally a "KUTE" hand protection as a glove.
 

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hanghai


shanghai



Description

soldier using bulletproof vest for protection (1932)


Recent comments

  • John Rutledge (Tue 18 Nov 2014 05:50:17 AM EST)
    show summary
    Interesting. The "bulletproof vest" is part of an armoured suit used by pioneers involved in bomb disposal. These suits - which were commonly used in WW1 - gave a degree of protection in the event of the bomb going off - but were a very heavy encumbrance, and must have made the delicate process of defusing a charge more difficult. Unusual to see a breastplate of this kind used like this. Best regards, JR.
 

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carriers


carriers



Description

photo taken inside a japanese dive bomber of the akagi carrier


Recent comments

  • FlasherTM (Thu 26 Apr 2012 04:13:14 AM EDT)
    Akagi carried 21 Zeroes, 21 Vals & 21 Kates as her fighting Wing at Midway. There were also other packaged Planes in storage aboard to be used from Midway's Airbase after it's capture!
  • pionier07 (Sun 18 Mar 2012 03:23:28 AM EDT)
    Nice picture.
  • FlasherTM (Sun 18 Mar 2012 01:01:12 AM EDT)
    1942-04 Akagi in the Indian Ocean.
  • Ardee (Tue 09 Jun 2009 02:06:16 PM EDT)
    The same might be said about Midway ... where the Akagi was sunk.
  • Huijgens (Tue 09 Jun 2009 05:23:29 AM EDT)
    Many of the planes that attacked Pearl Harbor took off from this ship.
 

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giant rifle

giant rifle



Description

japanese soldier with a strange rifle captured from the chinese called ´´gingal``


Recent comments
  • John Rutledge (Mon 04 Jan 2010 05:58:22 AM EST)
    show summary
    "Rifle", I think, is the wrong word. I think what we are looking at here is a "wall gun" - a very long smoothbore musket, used pretty extensively, in China among other places, between the early 17th century and the early 19th century - probably later than that in China. Thanks to the long barrel, these things were more accurate than standard smoothbore muskets but - for the same reason - were impossible to use simply from the shoulder; they were usually mounted, or at least rested, on a wall for firing (hence the name) or sometimes fitted with a tripod. Early examples are of matchlock type. I cannot quite make out whether this was a matchlock or a flintlock. The lock appears a bit elaborate for a matchlock; I suspect that this is a 19th century flintlock example (although an earlier matchlock, with flintlock conversion, is a possibility). This is certainly the sort of thing the Japanese might have come across in China - although I doubt whether even the Chinese armies of the time would have ventured firing one at them - even the most inadequate "modern" rifle would have been more effective - and safer. As regards Japan itself, such weapons would have been known there, but only to a limited extent. Between the early 17th century and the mid-19th, guns were effectively banned in Japan, except for a limited number of hunting and ornamental models. I gather that the latter category included some ornamental wall guns, used to adorn Japanese castles. I have never seen one of these - but a beautiful little matchlock pistol, carrying the mark of the Tokugawa clan, that I saw a few years ago in Amsterdam would give some idea of what the Japanese regarded as "ornamental" in a gun; beautiful, but pretty useless. I think that a Japanese soldier coming across this ruggedly practical (if totally obsolete) weapon in China would see it as a strange novelty !
 

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Polish navy deflagrated an Tall Boy close to the island of Usedom (Ger)
The "Tallboy" weighs 5340 kilos, is 6.35 meters long and carries 2400 kilos of highly explosive material. The site in the Swine was cordoned off within a radius of 2.5 kilometers and was monitored by video cameras.
It seems to me that it wasn't a deflagration but a veritable detonation.
 

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battleship


battleship



Description

japanese battleship hyuga


Recent comments

  • Aurelian Teglas (Tue 30 Jun 2015 01:00:05 PM EDT)
    Half battleship half carrier. Strange breed of warship. :)
  • Rey (Tue 30 Jun 2015 04:45:16 AM EDT)
    That Is IJN ISe remodel.. From Hyuga class.
  • FlasherTM (Sun 18 Mar 2012 01:03:20 AM EDT)
    1943 Hyuga on trials after her conversion.
 

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japanese paratrooper

japanese paratrooper


Description

japanese paratrooper caring the ashes of his fallen comrad
 

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japanese tank

japanese tank


Description

japanese heavy tank 1945


Recent comments
  • John Rutledge (Fri 16 May 2014 07:29:48 AM EDT)
    Sorry - re. my previous comment, the final paragraph should refer to "Chi-To" rather than "Chi Ho". Typo ... JR.
  • John Rutledge (Fri 16 May 2014 07:27:27 AM EDT)
    show summary
    Interesting photo. A number of Japanese tanks, self-propelled guns and howitzers share a similar body profile, but the long-barreled Type 5 75mm gun identifies this with reasonable certainty as a Type 4 Chi-To Medium Tank. This vehicle went into development in 1943, and may be seen as a response to US tanks (principally the M4 Sherman) that had proved themselves superior to any armour deployed by Japan at the time. This vehicle weighed 30 tonnes, had 75mm frontal armour and, as mentioned, carried the powerful Type 5 75mm cannon, as well as two 7.7 mm machine guns. Had it arrived in 1943, it might have posed difficulties for the average Sherman. However development was slowed to a crawl by technical difficulties and, increasingly, by the effects of ever-heavier US bombing of the Japanese homeland. As a result, only two completed early production examples (and a number of part-completed) were produced in 1945. Further production of 25 tanks per month was envisaged, but never realized.

    The Type 4 Chi-Ho, along with other related Japanese "medium" tanks and self-propelled artillery, was earmarked for the defence of the Japanese homeland against the expected Allied seaborne invasion. Projected further production was curtailed by the cessation of hostilities which did not involve a seaborne invasion ... Best regards, JR.
 

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Tokyo Rose mug shot

Tokyo Rose mug shot


Description

Iva Toguri aka. "Tokyo Rose" mug shot of the Japanese\American at Sugamo prison March 46(rudeerude)


Recent comments
  • John Rutledge (Mon 21 May 2012 05:20:14 AM EDT)
    show summary
    Not that it at all excuses the FBI for committing a dreadful crime of perjury that commmitted an innocent person to prision, but I think that the US authorities must have been under a lot of pressure to punish "Tokyo Rose" after the war. One problem in doing so, I understand, is that there were, in fact, more than one "Tokyo Roses". How many ladies from this poisonous flower-bed were in fact prosecuted in the end I do not know; it is sad to think that an innocent person might have been caught up in the confusion. Best regards, JR.
  • Grenadier Guard (Sun 20 May 2012 04:24:03 PM EDT)
    Her honor was restored when the association of American veterans of WWII presented her a special award in 2006. She died in the same year at 90.
  • Pablo (Fri 25 Mar 2011 10:59:46 PM EDT)
    show summary
    In 1976, investigative reporters in the U.S. discovered that FBI agents had suborned perjury against Ms. D'Aquino by two prosecution witnesses in order to obtain a conviction. It turned out that during the war she had risked her life smuggling food to Allied prisoners of war being held in Japan, and had never said anything to harm U.S. interests on the broadcasts she was forced to make.

    As a result, President Gerald Ford issued her a full and complete pardon in 1977, restoring her rights of U.S. citizenship.
  • The Colonel (Sat 13 Jun 2009 03:28:09 PM EDT)
    Iva Toguri D'Aquino, the Japanese-American convicted of treason in 1949 for broadcasting propaganda from Japan to US troops during WW2 as the seductive but sinister 'TOKYO ROSE', died on Tuesday September 26 2006 in Chicago. She was 90 years of age.
  • Timespanr (Sat 13 Jun 2009 02:54:06 PM EDT)
    show summary
    This sick person, broad cast news, music etc to American service men & women serving in Asia during WWII. In hopes of having some defections or creating some disaffection in the ranks.
    Where is she today, Living somewhere in the Chicago area last I heard of her.
    Trecherious, Trader and Turn coat to the US
 

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battleship


battleship



Description

japanese battleship hyuga


Recent comments

  • Aurelian Teglas (Tue 30 Jun 2015 01:00:05 PM EDT)
    Half battleship half carrier. Strange breed of warship. :)
  • Rey (Tue 30 Jun 2015 04:45:16 AM EDT)
    That Is IJN ISe remodel.. From Hyuga class.
  • FlasherTM (Sun 18 Mar 2012 01:03:20 AM EDT)
    1943 Hyuga on trials after her conversion.
Ise and Hyuga were built as battleships, with six twin turrets mounting 14" rifles. During WWII during the severe shortage of aviation ships caused by CV losses to USN, they were converted to sort of carriers by removing aft pair of main battery turrets and fitting a flight deck and catapults (launching and handling only: The ship's air group was intended to consist of a dozen each Yokosuka D4Y Suisei dive bombers - Allied reporting name "Judy" -, modified for catapult launching, and Aichi E16A reconnaissance aircraft - Allied reporting name "Paul". The former had to land either on a conventional carrier or on land bases, whereas the E16A could be hoisted back aboard using a crane, after landing on the water near the ship). Ship never had an air group embarked, since planes and pilots were too short in supply by the time she was converted.

Be interesting to build models in as-launched and as-converted and sit them side-by-side. Be from not terribly expensive (around $50 for a 1/700 scale kit) to a lot more than I'd care to spend (around $300 for a Fujimi 1:350 kit) for the project.
 

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giant rifle

giant rifle



Description

japanese soldier with a strange rifle captured from the chinese called ´´gingal``


Recent comments
  • John Rutledge (Mon 04 Jan 2010 05:58:22 AM EST)
    show summary
    "Rifle", I think, is the wrong word. I think what we are looking at here is a "wall gun" - a very long smoothbore musket, used pretty extensively, in China among other places, between the early 17th century and the early 19th century - probably later than that in China. Thanks to the long barrel, these things were more accurate than standard smoothbore muskets but - for the same reason - were impossible to use simply from the shoulder; they were usually mounted, or at least rested, on a wall for firing (hence the name) or sometimes fitted with a tripod. Early examples are of matchlock type. I cannot quite make out whether this was a matchlock or a flintlock. The lock appears a bit elaborate for a matchlock; I suspect that this is a 19th century flintlock example (although an earlier matchlock, with flintlock conversion, is a possibility). This is certainly the sort of thing the Japanese might have come across in China - although I doubt whether even the Chinese armies of the time would have ventured firing one at them - even the most inadequate "modern" rifle would have been more effective - and safer. As regards Japan itself, such weapons would have been known there, but only to a limited extent. Between the early 17th century and the mid-19th, guns were effectively banned in Japan, except for a limited number of hunting and ornamental models. I gather that the latter category included some ornamental wall guns, used to adorn Japanese castles. I have never seen one of these - but a beautiful little matchlock pistol, carrying the mark of the Tokugawa clan, that I saw a few years ago in Amsterdam would give some idea of what the Japanese regarded as "ornamental" in a gun; beautiful, but pretty useless. I think that a Japanese soldier coming across this ruggedly practical (if totally obsolete) weapon in China would see it as a strange novelty !
Jingals were manufactured up to the end of the 19th century and the newest were bolt guns using .65 and .75 caliber gatling gun ammo. They were used in the field, with one soldier holding the barrel on their shoulder and another firing it. But their basic intended use was as wall guns in fortifications. Europeans had similar as well, from amusettes even to the present with .50 caliber rifles.
 

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Hail of Flak

Hail of Flak


Description

Japanese torpedo bomber flying through hail of anti aircraft flak during an attack on the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown CV-10(rudeerude)
 

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Jap Notice to Thai's (click for translation)

Jap Notice to Thai's (click for translation)


Description

This is a poster (In Thai) to inform the Thai citizens about the occupation of their country by Japan......

'Announcement
For Thai people, the reason why we land in Thailand is by a friendship treaty and to defend both of our countries. Therefore our nations will prosper in friendship and respect for each other.
We come to prevent your country from invasion by UK and USA so that your country can retain its freedom and honour.
Thai people have been working hard to create a new regulation in Great Asia and expel the European Forces.
As I am a Japanese Commander now, may I state again that you must watch over these things correctly so you must support the Japanese Army in its objectives.
1. Japanese army will retain the property of Thais who disobey orders and work against us.
2. Thai people should trust and support Japanese army. Be satisfied in your job, there is nothing to fear.
3. If anyone ruin the railway, the road and bridge for example you will be punished hard because it means you resist our army.
4. Railway officers and path communication workers who co-operate will be rewarded.
Luang Pibulsonggram the Thai Prime Minister gives his backing to this action. Hopefully Thai people will trust his announcement.
Japanese Army Commander'
 

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Battleship Haruna after air attack

Battleship Haruna after air attack


Description

Battleship Haruna after air attack. Kure, summer 1945


Recent comments
  • FlasherTM (Tue 18 Feb 2014 08:26:41 PM EST)
    1945-10-08 Battleship Haruna sunk in shallows at Kure.
 

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Battleship Haruna under air attack

Battleship Haruna under air attack


Description

Battleship Haruna (class Kongo) under air attack. Kure, July 28, 1945.


Recent comments
  • Jazzman (Fri 28 Nov 2008 10:54:03 PM EST)
    Yeah, and look at the size of the explosions!!
  • downwithpeace (Wed 26 Nov 2008 03:27:48 PM EST)
    Really good photo, shows what a size those ships were.
 

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Japanese aircraft carrier Junyo

Japanese aircraft carrier Junyo


Description

Japanese aircraft carrier Junyo. Sasebo, August 1945


Recent comments
  • Laconia (Fri 21 Nov 2008 06:52:47 PM EST)
    I was just gonna point out that sub. It's too bad some of those japanese ships weren't kept after the war as historical artifects.
  • beesa (Fri 21 Nov 2008 09:58:54 AM EST)
    And what looks like 2 Sen Taka Sho submarines taking shelter.
 
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