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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The pic file is filling up again - time to post. SW

1) What make motorcycles?
2) The slightly blurred image hints it may not have been posed
3) Smoke & mirrors
4) ditto
5) dam buster
6 through 9) experimental as captioned. #9 looks like a trap door rifle.
 

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#3 and #4 have me confused, guess that means they work.....LOL!
#6 is a helpful picture.
#7 That would NOT be fun to wear in the trenches...
#8 Ian Hogg once said that Italy's own armament industry was their worst enemy in WW2. Looks like that was true even further back...
#9 If that had ever been fielded, there would be a line of veterans outside the inventors house, holding hammers and eager to demonstrate the drawbacks of encasing your head in sheetmetal. And is that a 1873 Springfield on his shoulder?
 

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The pic file is filling up again - time to post. SW

1) What make motorcycles?
2) The slightly blurred image hints it may not have been posed
3) Smoke & mirrors
4) ditto
5) dam buster
6 through 9) experimental as captioned. #9 looks like a trap door rifle.
1) No idea, but Japanese
2) Looks like real combat footage to me. Also looks like there is a flamethrower involved
3 & 4) Some of the fakes used to deceive the Germans about where the actual concentration for Overlord was, i think
5) nailed that - one of Barnes Wallis's rotating bombs on a Lancaster
6-9) The American helmets 1A and 2A are clear ancestors of the steel pots we all knew and loathed from WWII through and beyond Vietnam
 

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Some of those helmets look like they belong on the Death Star. :D
 

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1) 3 & 4) Some of the fakes used to deceive the Germans about where the actual concentration for Overlord was, i think
Looks like the desert to me. That model of Stuart would have been pretty rare by Overlord, and I've seen similar pictures (with Crusaders) dated back to El Alemain and earlier.
 

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Pic #5 is an Upkeep weapon fitted to AJ-G flown by Wing Commander Guy Gibson on the Dams raid. The aircraft was restored to standard Lancaster configuration and survived the war but was scrapped at a Maintenance Unit.
 

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#9 looks like a lot Ned Kelly. Maybe it's a Snider. ;-)
 

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I want to know if any of those dummy tanks were ever sold as surplus. Love to get one!
 

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#1 looks possibly to be a rikou copy/version of the harley .They had a license to build harleys prior to WWII,and that picture looks sort of early ,maybe china incident..JMHO
 

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#9 is the "Brewster Body Armor" it weighed 40+ pounds, made of nickle steel and would stop Lewis Gun bullets. It was designed by the same company that later designed and built the Brewster Buffalo!!!

Oneshooter
Livin in Texas
 

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I've heard of the dummy tanks used for the overlord diversion (and I agree that pic looks african) but the tank disguised as a truck? GENIUS!
 

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:confused:
 

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Shouldn't they be wearing cowboy hats?
 

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Where is that thing? And what the f**k is it? Looks like it might be in a Russian museum, but what and where?
Klingon Bird of Prey.
 

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Where is that thing? And what the f**k is it? Looks like it might be in a Russian museum, but what and where?

Ask, and ye shall receive . . .

Bartini Beriev VVA-14

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VVA-14


VVA-14M1P without wings or engines at the Monino museum, RussiaRoleAmphibious ASW aircraftNational originSoviet UnionManufacturerBerievDesigned byRobert BartiniFirst flight1972StatusRetiredNumber built2 PrototypesThe Bartini Beriev VVA-14 Vertikal`no-Vzletayuschaya Amphibia (vertical take-off amphibious aircraft) was developed in the Soviet Union during the 1970s. Designed to be able to take-off from the water and fly at high speed over long distances, It was to make true flights at high altitude, but also have the capability of 'flying' efficiently just above the sea surface, using ground effect. The VVA-14 was designed by Robert Bartini in answer to a perceived requirement to destroy United States Navy Polaris missile submarines.

[edit] Development

Bartini, in collaboration with the Beriev Design Bureau intended to develop the prototype VVA-14 in three phases. The VVA-14M1 was to be an aerodynamics and technology test-bed, initially with rigid pontoons on the ends of the central wing section, and later with these replaced by inflatable pontoons. The VVA-14M2 was to be more advanced, with two starting engines to blast into the cavity under the wing to give lift and later with a battery of lift engines to give VTOL capability, and with fly-by-wire flight controls. The VVA-14M3 would see the VTOL vehicle fully equipped with armament and with the Burevestnik computerised ASW (anti-submarine warfare) system, Bor-1 MAD (magnetic anomaly detector) and other operational equipment.

[edit] History

After extensive research, including the development of the small prototype Be-1 wing in ground effect aircraft, the first VVA-14 prototype was completed in 1972. Its first flight was from a conventional runway on 4th September 1972.
In 1974 the inflatable pontoons were installed, though their operation caused many problems. Flotation and water taxi tests followed, culminating in the start of flight testing of the amphibious aircraft on 11th June 1975.
The inflatable pontoons were later replaced by rigid pontoons, whilst the fuselage was lengthened and the starting engines added. This incarnation was given the designation VVA-14M1P. However, the bureau tasked with supplying the intended battery of 12 RD-36-35PR lift engines did not deliver, and this made VTOL testing impossible.
After Bartini's death in 1974, the project slowed and eventually drew to a close, the aircraft having conducted 107 flights, with a total flight time of 103 hours. The only remaining VVA-14, No. 19172, was retired to the Russian Federation Central Air Force Museum, Monino in 1987. The aircraft still resides at the museum in a dismantled state, where it carries the number '10687' and 'Aeroflot'.
 

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Thank yoiu, sir. I thought it looked Soviet.
 
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