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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Mostly pics from the "Soviet Army Museum". Shown are some obscure Nazi & Russian militaria. SW

1) Not a "Bolo" ( bolshevik) but that sure looks like a Steyr M.95 behind it
2) Panzer grenadier "Viking" gear - so the caption sez
3) Gestapo & SS militaria. The SS brass knucks amaze me - they didn't miss a trick!
4) Alledgedly Hitler's scorched jacket
5) Lend-lease partisan equipment. Slenced Sten and "M-2" radio
6) Uncle Joe's presentation grade Shpagin. What a stock!
7) USS Langley?
8) N Korean prisoners?
9) Movie prop?
10) Just a pic of the rocket launcher in action
 

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#9 I have a feeling it's not a prop, just somebodies, "Hey wouldn't it be cool if...?" That said, the graininess and focus of the tank look different from the rest of the picture.
#1 is indeed an M95, as I sit here typing this I have almost that exact viewpoint of my own across the room, which is somehow a little spooky. Unfortunately, my view ISN'T obscured by a broom handle Mauser.
 

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#7 you are correct.

Found a copy online with this caption:

" USS Langley (CV-1) underway off San Diego, California, 1928, with Vought VE-7 aircraft on her flight deck. USS Somers (DD-301) is in the background. "
 

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#8- Check out the men walking the ridge. L-R, Browning Bar, Thompson smg, Garand with blade bayonet. Looks more WW II/occupied Japan to me, than Korea, but I could be wrong. I've seen that pic before- probably in an old Life magazine.

-Flat Springs
 

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#9 is certainly a miniature A7V, but beyond that - wouldn't care to speculate.

Anybody but me know what the significance of the name "Somers" as applied to a naval vessel of the United States is? (Hint - it has been used more than once, and the famous one wasn't DD-301).
 

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#9 is certainly a miniature A7V, but beynd that - wouldn't care to speculate.

Anybody bit me know what the significance of the name "Somers" as applied to a naval vessel of the United States is? (Hint - it has been used more than once, and the famous one wasn't DD-301).
Wasn't that the sloop of war where the son of the SecNav was found guilty of attempted mutiny and subsequently hanged?
 

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Wasn't that the sloop of war where the son of the SecNav was found guilty of attempted mutiny and subsequently hanged?
Yep, that's it. Next question - what connection did that incident (or the parties involved) have to the War of Northern Aggression and the Indian Wars? Hint - "Bad Hand".
 

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Was the commander, Alexander MacKenzie, kin to Ranald MacKenzie?

Other connections:
- Major driver for the establishment of the Naval Academy
- Basis for a Hermann Melville story.
 

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The CO of the USS Somers was Alexander S. Mackenzie. The "S" stands for Slidell. John Slidell, a CSA diplomat, was his uncle. His brother was Gen. Ranald S. Mackenzie, who served in the Civil War and the following Indian Wars. Nicknamed "Bad Hand" because of an injury during an assault on Petersburg.
Hope I remembered my history correctly!!
 

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And John Slidell was one of the principals in the Trent Affair, another landmark in our maritime past. It's amazing how incestuous our history is when you look behind the curtains.
 

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The CO of the USS Somers was Alexander S. Mackenzie. The "S" stands for Slidell. John Slidell, a CSA diplomat, was his uncle. His brother was Gen. Ranald S. Mackenzie, who served in the Civil War and the following Indian Wars. Nicknamed "Bad Hand" because of an injury during an assault on Petersburg.
Hope I remembered my history correctly!!
No, Ranald Slidell Mackenzie was Alexander's son. Beyond the relationship, you did fine. Ranald died a suicide (in New York), allegedly driven mad by unremitting pain from his War of Northern Aggression injuries. Other explanations of a less honorable nature have been suggested, but there isn't any evidence to back those up (other than somewhat circumstantial speculations). With the exception of George Custer, he was the youngest general officer in the Union Army, and unlike Custer, was a brilliant student at West Point (graduated near the top of his class, commissioned an engineer as was once the custom for the cream of the graduating class). Post-war wound up in the Cavalree, and broke the Comanches by an extraordinarily well-planned and conducted (and brutal) winter campaign.
 

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Holy smokes! Look at that PPsh! I love it! I wish mine was that beutiful. WHat kind of wood is that? Artic Birch? Atlantic Firearms(where I bought mine) said mine was artic birch too, but it doesn't look anything like that.
 
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