Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, my name is Devvin. I have come across this pistol upon doing an estate clean out. Since then I really never had interest in selling the gun but times have come down and been fairly hard. I have sent and had numerous people look at the gun and someone wrote me back and said "Martini-Henry action, or better yet, inspired by a Martini-Henry action of the MkIv pattern? (or most closely resembles a MkIV). It is most likely what we call a “Khyber Pass” gun, made in Afghanistan with copied British broad arrow Victorian era markings and Anglo lettering" He then went on and recommended let some of the guys on here take a look if none the less just so you all could get a look because to him it was something he hadn't seen and said it was unique that maybe someone could tell me more about it. Thanks again for all the looks and please feel free to write me on here or at [email protected] Again Thanks and I look forward to speaking with you, Devvin.
 

Attachments

·
Platinum Bullet Member
Joined
·
4,612 Posts
An interesting conversation piece perhaps...don't ever try to shoot it. I don't see any British markings on it other than the typical profusion of marks applied under the maxim of "if one backwards WD stamp looks official, 15 of 'em must look that much more so". It's possible that it was carved out of an actual MkIV Martini, but I tend to doubt it. These are starting to show up fairly regularly these days.

Might be some limited interest from those looking to add a piece of the tribal gunmakers' art to their collection, but the ones I've seen for sale tend to stay that way for quite a while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
843 Posts
What you've got is more of a work of tribal art than anything else. It is a gun, of course. But as noted above, shooting it probably isn't worth the risk. The trick with tribal art -- like Native American or African tribal art, for example -- is usually getting someone trusted by the collector community to authenticate it. I don't know what kind of market may exist for, say, Afghan or Pakistani tribal art. I suspect it's not a hot market right now. But I may be wrong about that. I suspect the better question is where the market is going and when it may mature into a market that's nicely profitable for those folks who've acquired, authenticated, and kept that art. I really hate to see you get discouraged by the thumbs-down on the question of value you're getting here. From your posting, I gather you're among the great many Americans slogging through some real hard times right now. Take a look at the auction houses that handle art, artifacts, and high end antiques. You can contact many, if not all, of those big name auction houses with photos and info for consideration. You may get no more than a yes or no from them, but it won't cost you anything to try them. Again -- that's a very cool hand crafted weapon and if not today -- then some day -- it may have a value on par with similar works of tribal art in the form of weapons from Africa. Best of luck to you. Chin up, as the Brits say. We will make this better. Maybe not all better. Maybe not fast. But things will get better.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,034 Posts
Tribal Art!!! Never heard them called that before. This one is Local and crudly made. There are indeed some very fancy made pieces, but this isn't one of those.

It's a Khyber Pass piece, made for sale to tourist in the Bazaars.

This one has some signs of being made from an original MH, or at least some original parts. The front receiver ring has been cut down and the rear receiver has been under cut. This one would be very unsafe to fire. It's a .303. There is no way to tell how old it is. The markings are random bogus markings.

Here's the deal, people think these things are special and just can't believe they aren't anything special. Accordingly when they are offered on Gunborker, they seem to go for outrageous amounts. Take advantage of that and offer it on Gunbroker. It will have to be transfer outside your state via an FFL as it can not be documented as antique.

I would start bidding at $100 and see where bidding goes. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you everyone for the continuous post and comments. As I said I'm really not that well informed on stuff like this so I've sought out the help of people like you all who know a little more about it than myself. This has been some of this best information I've attained so far. I really appreciate it and keep it coming. I may end up trying the gun broker thing myself. I just wish I had got to speak with the previous owner and got some history on it before they passed away. Thanks again, Devvin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
409 Posts
I would call a $100 bid very generous. Every time someone overpays -- or even just pays at all -- for this tribal stuff, it just encourages more offerings. No offense, Devvin, no one's blaming you. However, I personally would not contemplate paying over $50.

Coggansfield
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,266 Posts
Think of it as the pet rock of gun collecting. Pet rocks sold like crazy...but were just a paperweight. Never let the public's insane desire to spend their money stop one from allowing them.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top