Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,678 Posts
Fantastic pictures thanks for posting!
Jim
Yes... A Grand Old Lady like the TEXAS should not be forgotten.

Been aboard TEXAS many times... Always went to see Her when in the Houston area.
 

·
Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
Joined
·
100,574 Posts
Probably in Measure 12 (Modified). Texas is a handsome ship (not to mention historic), and it upsets me (GREATLY) that the State of Texas has not and is not taking proper care of her.
 

·
Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
Joined
·
100,574 Posts
What a great idea to turn the ship to calm the sea. Well thought out.
Standard method to create a slick on the lee side of the vessel to allow easier recovery of a float plane (or a boat). Dates back, at least, to the earliest days of steam propulsion. Clever brutes, those mariners...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
847 Posts
Notice the M1903 rifles the marines had. At this time the Marines drew their small arms from the army. Not enough M1 Garands available to arm the marines. That is why when the Army came to the 'canal the biggest problem they had was keeping the Garands . Set one down to get chow, when you came back it was gone, and a 1903 was in its place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,240 Posts
A good friend of mine, the late Chuck Karwan, disputed the above statement. His research showed that MacArthur offered the USMC the M1 Garand before Guadalcanal , but the leadership of the USMC turned him down, electing to keep the Springfield. The Marines on the ground made their own decisions in favor of the M1. John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Texas_(BB-35)#1988.E2.80.931990_dry_dock_period

Check Wikipedia at the above link to see what the Texas has gone through and apparently a new dry dock operation is nearly finished.

I did not that the "repairs" made didn't seem to last very long. Well, 20 years, but the original welder's seams lasted what, 80 years?

I visited her 55 years ago and it was the thrill of my 12 year lifetime....and still ranks up there.

RBH
 

·
Diamond Member
Joined
·
4,293 Posts
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Texas_(BB-35)#1988.E2.80.931990_dry_dock_period

Check Wikipedia at the above link to see what the Texas has gone through and apparently a new dry dock operation is nearly finished.

I did not that the "repairs" made didn't seem to last very long. Well, 20 years, but the original welder's seams lasted what, 80 years?

I visited her 55 years ago and it was the thrill of my 12 year lifetime....and still ranks up there.

RBH
Well, no, as far as anyone knows, that dry berthing project has not yet commenced. She was closed for a short time to visitors last fall due to worries over continuing leaks.

The last time she was in drydock was 1990. The original plates and welds didn't last 80 years. During her time as an active vessel, she was regularly in and out of drydock for repair and replacement. Then she sat for forty plus years with nothing done, and almost didn't make the drydock when they took her in '90, from what I've heard. No ship does well in the water when it sits for decades without major hull maintenance.
 

·
Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
Joined
·
100,574 Posts


She was removed from her "permanent mooring" a few years ago and the hull at least was repaired. I don't know if they've done anything else.

RBH
They did a fair amount besides exterior hull in the dry-dock period. Tore off the concrete and repaired weather decks and put down new, treated pine (decks were apparently originally pine or spruce rather then teak; of course we had no source of teak, had to buy it overseas from British Empire). Problem is - not much afterwards and there has been in the decades since a good deal of deterioration, leading to flooding and such.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,240 Posts
I went thru the USS North Carolina in Wilmington (?) and it was very interesting, especially looking at the Fire Control Center. It was an entire room with switches and wheels around the outside and intricate calculating machines in the inside of the room. A Retired Navy Captain told us he had trained on that system and it was as accurate as a computer based one, but required a lot of practice. In the engine room, in just one corner (about 8' by 8') there were something like 13 valves (?) operated by round handles like for a outdoor faucet but larger, that were painted red, plus a lot of other ones. Learning that sequence of what valve did what must have required a lot of training, and hate to think of being down their during an engagement. Supposedly in one of its first engagements, they got a message asking if they were on fire? They were not, just putting out so many rounds from their guns, that the smoke made it look like it was on fire. We went down into the bowels of the ship at the stern and 2 hours later came back up to the deck, and had only covered about 2/3 of the ship. Great tour with former crew members to explain things. Sounds like they should do the same for the Texas. John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,786 Posts
I went thru the USS North Carolina in Wilmington (?) and it was very interesting, especially looking at the Fire Control Center. It was an entire room with switches and wheels around the outside and intricate calculating machines in the inside of the room. A Retired Navy Captain told us he had trained on that system and it was as accurate as a computer based one, but required a lot of practice. In the engine room, in just one corner (about 8' by 8') there were something like 13 valves (?) operated by round handles like for a outdoor faucet but larger, that were painted red, plus a lot of other ones. Learning that sequence of what valve did what must have required a lot of training, and hate to think of being down their during an engagement. Supposedly in one of its first engagements, they got a message asking if they were on fire? They were not, just putting out so many rounds from their guns, that the smoke made it look like it was on fire. We went down into the bowels of the ship at the stern and 2 hours later came back up to the deck, and had only covered about 2/3 of the ship. Great tour with former crew members to explain things. Sounds like they should do the same for the Texas. John
I was on a destroyer built in the '60's and we had both the analog fire control computer (that took up an entire compartment and didn't work) and an even more complicated engineering plant. Before you are qualified to stand watch on them you are required to trace all the pipes and know what every valve does. Once you figure out the system it's much easier to figure out what any particular valve does because the valves were color-coded: white was steam, red was firemain, blue was fresh water, green was salt water, yellow was fuel (I think), purple lubricant. We even had "Black Water" (where the brown trout swam).
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top