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Discussion Starter #1
Gents,

I've had this SVT about 15 years. It is all stamped matching excepting an un numbered magazine, not forced matched. Oddly, there is no arsenal mark on the Nock's form. It does look rubbed but not ground. Any ideas what arsenal and year this could be? Any ideas why its like this? No evidence of Finn ownership I can find. The sling is what was on it when I bought it.

TIA,
VG 0[1] (2).jpg 0[1].jpg 0[3].jpg 0[2].jpg 0[1].jpg 0[2].jpg
 

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It looks to me like it was ground off...possibly due to rust that is still noticeable on the sides...someone here may be able to give you an idea due to the serial#.
 

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Factory 314 in Tula, 1941. Finn capture.
Can you post pictures of all serials? Trigger guard, stock, bolt, bolt carrier.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, I'll post more photos later today. Thanks for the initial assessment. How, in the absence of markings, were you able to determine the factory, year, and Finnish capture?
 

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Factory can be identified by font used. Year by receiver features and serial prefix. Finnish provenance by knowing other rifles with "SA" in the same range.
 

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I don't think you can draw that sort of conclusion.
I think judging by single fact that prefix belongs to know range - it's a guess. Judging by the several facts that confirm each other (stock finish, rifle finish, sling, marking, typical modifications) - yes, you can.
 

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I think judging by single fact that prefix belongs to know range - it's a guess. Judging by the several facts that confirm each other (stock finish, rifle finish, sling, marking, typical modifications) - yes, you can.
Stock and rifle finish are not proof of anything. Finnish imports are usually well worn with sanded and oiled stocks but so what? There are not enough pics to judge that fully anyway. Sling could have been added at any time and I don't see any modifications. Assuming this is a factory matching rifle, that would also be very unusual for a Finnish rifle.

This could be a Finnish rifle but I don't see anything to suggest that in these photos.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the great comments and insight. The weather amongst other things got in my way of getting more and better photos which I will do tomorrow. This is all stamped matching but I'll let the pics speak for themselves. If the Nocks is truly ground, why in the world would anybody do that? It certainly cannot have been an attempt to conceal the rifles "identity" as the serial number is untouched. I found this in a pawn shop, the owner had it tagged as a Russian rifle and knew nothing beyond that. I figured at $285 USD out the door it was a pretty good deal even 15 years ago.
 

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Viking guy, it is possible that your rifle is a no maker mark rifle. Some SVT 40 rifles never got the date and factory stamp on top the receiver. They are uncommon and very cool. Look forward to seeing better pictures.
 

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Viking guy, it is possible that your rifle is a no maker mark rifle. Some SVT 40 rifles never got the date and factory stamp on top the receiver. They are uncommon and very cool. Look forward to seeing better pictures.
Matt, "no make" would still have acceptance markings on top, in this case everything was ground off.
 

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@Viking Guy check two things in your rifle - gas valve for "2" position (Finnish treat) and bottom of stock wrist for repair depot markings (German treat).
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Okay, more photos. Bolt, carrier, trigger guard, stock wrist, gas valve, and a better photo of Nocks with crud cleaned off, really doesn't look ground to me because the depth at which arsenal stamps are made would necessitate pretty aggressive grinding in my opinion. Also, the only marks I can find on the magazine. So, interested in more thoughts on the rifle and thanks for your interest.
 

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Well, I can see that carrier, bolt and trigger guard are matching but it doesn't help identification. Picture of the wrist are is too small to see anything and I assume you haven't spotted any German markings there. Gas valve possible "2" marking could have been in place of "1.1", the original lowest setting IIRC. Is "1.1" still present?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thank you for the reply, I was afraid the thread had fizzled out. Yes, 1.1 still is present and there are no markings on the wrist. Also, there are no definitive markings on the stock however, there is possibly a "3" on the left side butt, very faint. The serial number does have a 3 in it. As I understand it, a sanded stock is indicative of Finnish ownership at some point? I did shoot this rifle after I first purchased it and it functioned flawlessly, but have not since. I would welcome opinions as to whether I should continue to shoot it or is it enough of a collectible piece I should leave well enough alone. I remain curious as to why anyone would remove the arsenal marks, if in fact they did. When looking at the rifle, not at my lousy photography, it honestly does not look to have been ground and even the surface color matches the rest of the rifle. Using ground Arisakas as a model, which are admittedly very crudely ground, the ground portion down to the raw metal most always has rust or traces of rust. This exhibits none of those characteristics. Being not well versed in SVTs, I'm most certainly at a loss. Looking forward to more info. BTW, I've got the blobs too on my laptop but when viewing on my android there are no blobs.
 

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Top of receiver was certainly ground. "No make" rifles are known, but all rifles have QA and acceptance markings. Yours is clear, no such receiver could have ended up on the rifle.
Now about identification.
The more I look at other rifles with close serials the more I understand I don't have an answer with reasonably high probability
Basically you assess number of features and try to match known pattern. And while there are some features that might be pointing to Finnish provenance, there's no definite indications like "SA" or "2" on gas valve. I know about 4 rifles close to this one with "SA" marking and about 5 rifles that like yours "might be" and one of them also has markings scrubbed. And there's one trainer in this group. So what does it mean? Could have been that all those rifles were captured and only few of them went for repair or inventory of Finnish army, while other found they ways to home? Or maybe one group was captured by Finns, while other by another army (German, Hungarian, Italian, you name it). Maybe second subgroup has seen post war service in Poland and thus training rifle? Or maybe all of them were captured by German army but supplied to Finland. I think @RyanE posted while ago about inventory transfer from Germany to Finland, with types of firearms and numbers.

Until this group or subgroup of rifles is positively identified (and I don't see how we can do it in the nearest future) noone can tell you for sure. It's definitely not high-end collectible rifle, as stock is messed up and as I understand not matching? But it's not a Soviet refurb either, most common type of rifle available in North America. I would say forget about identifying (the story), just consider what you have (the rifle).
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for your insights. I'll take your advice and accept I've not found a lost da Vinci but rather somewhat of a garden variety though representative SVT-40 and just enjoy it for what it is. Appreciate all your time and efforts
 
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