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I am trying to figure the origin of this gun, photos here:
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v26/manowar/Perc1866/
The side plate has a small bird crest and '866', assumably for 1866.
The gun has many marking, unusual on a percussion gun.
Every metal part is stamped with a letter B and two weird characters, one looks like a Greek Sigma, the other maybe a Tau, it looks like a bent arrow. Possibly even Hebrew characters?
The barrel has a hammer-like mark, which I have seen on Belgian and English guns.
It has a unit marking 80.6.18
Unusual features:
It has an adjustable military type rear sight, not usually on a percussion gun. The trigger guard tang is very long going towards the butt, and the rear swivel is mounted on this tang.
Thank you in advance for any help ID-ing this gun.
 

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Very nice! You have an Austrian M1862 Lorenz rifle musket, .54 cal. They made two versions of the Lorenz, one was the M1854 and this one, the M1862, the chief difference being the shape of the lockplate, the had the bolster set into the forward, flat-topped section of the plate and the second was very similar in shape to the British P53 lock as can be seen here. The Lorenz, especially the M1854 was heavily imported to this country and was used by both sides in the American Civil War. The leaf rear sight is not terribly common on either model of the Lorenz, many, if not most, had a simple block rear sight.

The Lorenz armed Austro-Hungarian troops had their heads handed to them by the breach loader armed Prussians in 1866 during the Austro-Prussian War, also known as the Seven Weeks War. After that experience, the Austrians began converting their Lorenz rifle muskets to breach loaders. Most of the late dated Lorenz were converted, yours with the late date is unusual to find in percussion. The Lorenz was a very sturdy, well made rifle musket and is quite popular with collectors today. Congratulations on a nice find.
 

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Yes, A Lorenz..The Later breech-loading conversion, with same sights , furniture etc, was the Wanzl (Rimfire, cal .55).

Typical Austrian Lock plate date, and Double Eagle acceptance/Property mark.
Even the Buttplate Unit ID is in the same style as the Wanzl(s) I have.

Assembly of Lock into complete rifle may have taken place in either 1866 or even later (67 or 68).

Nice one.
Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.
 

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May have been Reproofed at Liege when Surplussed out...It has also the Austrian Acceptance proofs as well. The Lock-maker's name is usually either on the outer or inner surface of the Lock plate.

Even though at the time, Guns were "Lock-Stock and Barrel," but with the individual parts still coming from different contractors. So the barrel could still be "Liege made", whilst the rest is "Austrian (or even "Gardone" (Austrian Lombardy).

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.
 

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Thank you for the excellent replies. I should have recognized it, but the Belgian proof and the "Greek letters" threw me off. I guess these should be gothic numbers, not letters.
The "Greek letters" are either Assembly or Inspector's Markings and were identifiable within that context at the time of manufacture but now are likely impossible to definitely identify.
 
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