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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All. FYI this is my first post on any form for anything ever so please excuse my lack of forum ettiquete. My question is will an unissued 91/30 have any innate accuracy benefits to a used M39? I understand the M39 has a better barrel and craftsmanship etc. But should an unissued 91/30 with a good bore shoot just as accurately? Or are the accuracy differences night and day? I only need either to be accurate enough for hunting purposes. Thanks in advance! -Paul
 

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M39 hands down better. Too many differences to enumerate. Better trigger, better sights, free floating barrel, extreme attention to detail in design and assembly. One of the best bolt action rifles ever built. Nothing wrong with the 91/30. I own five. But they are just in a different class that the M39
 

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Paulie: I assume you mean an unused 91/30 refurb? Should be a lot less expensive than an M39 and could shoot very well. I must be very unlucky as I've owned an inaccurate M39. On the other hand I have a $200 refurbed upgraded Dragoon that shoots very well with any ammo. Bottom line is it will be down to the actual condition of the particular rifle you buy.

Ruprecht
 

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Chcusnr,

Just asking here, but are you saying there is no way to tune a 91/30 to equal an M39 in accuracy? For arguments sake, lets limit the distance to 100-150yds.
 

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There is no question that Finnish Mosin variants have some design advantages over a basic Soviet 91/30. However, in my experience, the accuracy advantage is incremental, not the slam dunk of internet lore.The right Soviet 91/30 (of which there is a ready supply) is a close to 1 MOA rifle with good ammo, and if going against a Finnish variant in less-than-ideal condition, will outshoot it.
 

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Welcome to the forum!

Boy, tough one to answer - Either can be very accurate, either can not be accurate. I guess it depends upon the rifle - Too bad when we look at a rifle to buy, we can't shoot it first!


If economy is important, buy a 91-30 with a spectacular bore & I would wager it will be plenty accurate for hunting.

Pahtu.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wow, Thank you everyone for the prompt and informed replies. What a cool forum. I suppose considering I could afford the M39 (Albeit a few hundred more than the 91/30) that should the M39 not be a solid shooter even after a thorough inspection, cleaning, and finding what type of ammo she prefers to eat. Either I am not doing my part as well as I believe or it will never be accurate after nothing seems to work haha. Then later possibly try a nice 91/30 refurb or another M39 in "collectors condition" until I find one that shoots well. Nothing against either variation of rifle, but in this economy I'm looking for the best bang for my buck from the classic weapons I so love.
 

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M-39s are trendy and fashionable around here. 91/30s are just old, ordinary, dependable, plodding, work horses that will get the job done. Generally at a fraction of the cost of a spiffy, highly touted M-39.

I have one 91/30 that will put three shots into the same ragged hole.

Just my humble opinion of course.:)
 

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Welcome aboard!

As others have noted, bore condition on each and ammo have an impact for certain. I would agree that the M39 is generally better built.

But in terms of direct comparison, I have compared a PU sniper 91/30 with a crisp shiny bore to several m39s, same ammo, head to head. The PU was every bit as consistent as the best m39 I have, which is in comparable condition.

So I would say, in terms of saving money, look for an ex PU with a shiny bore. Or better yet, be patient and grab a deal on that and a m39, conduct your own trials, and report back!


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The biggest concern would be the "unissued 91/30" claim. Not saying they don't exist but a truly unissued 91/30 is a rare bird most of us will never see. I do see lots of sellers claim this when referring to some of the arsenal refurbished 91/30s that have been imported over the last few years.

Having said that; you can find 91/30s with very nice bores; some sellers will provide pics of the bore. Still no guarantee on accuracy but a good place to start.

I recently bought a 91/30 with a sniper bolt for a couple of reasons; one it had a legit sniper bolt, two the bore looked spectacular and three the price was right. When I received it the trigger pull was probably 3 pounds as worked over by the Yugoslavians. I thought great bore, great trigger equals tack driver!

Unfortunately on the first outing the rifle was shooting at least a foot to the right at 70yds and I couldn't drift the front site far enough to correct it at all! Looks like the barrel may have a slight bend in it! Sometimes like cars you just get a lemon but it doesn't happen that often. Good Luck and let us know what you pick up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My apologies. By "Unissued" I believe what was meant was great condition refurb lol. But considering the talk of the Finnish MNs from other forum members, does anyone know why for instance a SAKO rifle will be loads more expensive than a VKT? Are there any advantages one over the other besides collectability? Or is a Finnish rifle a whole 'nother ballpark of quality no matter which manufacturer?
 

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Like all rifles, there are lemons among the m/39s as well. My B barrel, built in the late 1970s, is one of them. It came with tilted front sight, roughly reamed chamber, mysterious (still unsolved) extraction/ejection problem and bad accuracy. I straightened the front sight, polished the chamber and tried to improve bedding. Still it fails to shoot better than 3-4" at 100m bench no matter what.

Should have kept that rifle in the collection as a sample of the post-war m/39s. Now that it is altered it has no value as a collectible.
 

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Don't discount the clunky old Russian guns, ever, the good ones will shoot very well.

My son bought a 44' Izhvesk ex-PU with his own saved up money. All said and done it cost him a $189.00 from the pawn shop. It's a beat up, ugly looking gun. You'd never believe it was a good shooter just by looking at it. He used an old saw horse for a "shooting bench" and sat in a lawn chair when he shot this target.

From the same set up, saw horse, lawn chair, fifty yards, the SAMCO imported, ex-Yugoslavian Army, Soviet built 44' restored PU put three shots of 148gr FMJ Tulammo into the same ragged hole.

So Paulie, I think if you're on a tight budget, a 43' or 44' ex-PU would be the way to go.

If, however, you are a collector with an eye on a return investment, then waiting until you find a quality M-39 or other Finn variant would be the way to go.
 

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Would think the average 91/30 or M39 would be fine for hunting at close ranges. But the only real way to see how you are going to get a long with any rifles is to shoot it in the conditions you plan on using it. I know people who can really shoot well off of sandbags on a bench with a nice roof over their heads. They talk about accuracy. But if your actually going to use the rifle in the field you will have to {as you mentioned} try it out with different ammo and then apply it to your skills as a hunter/shooter. Very few people on the internet want to tackle the concept of what constitutes accuracy. To have an accurate rifle and have no marksmanship skills won't help the novice shooter who never had training or practice shooting anywhere than off a bench. Again either should do you well for close range hunting purposes. I love hearing folks using these for hunting. Fun to collect, fun to shoot and fun to get game with a clunker like the MN rifle. Like farming with equipment from the 1950s, takes a little longer and break downs more often but in a twisted kind of way, cool. Regards, John.
 

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My apologies. By "Unissued" I believe what was meant was great condition refurb lol. But considering the talk of the Finnish MNs from other forum members, does anyone know why for instance a SAKO rifle will be loads more expensive than a VKT? Are there any advantages one over the other besides collectability? Or is a Finnish rifle a whole 'nother ballpark of quality no matter which manufacturer?
Finn rifles will vary model to model, not just overall when compared to Russians, so it really depends which 2 you want to compare. Certainly a 91/30 is a different animal than a M39. But the Finns made 91/30s as well.

Check out this link for one nice write up on the M39. The main page has more interesting stuff on other models too.

http://www.mosinnagant.net/finland/finnish_mosin_nagantm39.asp

For the M39, they were all built to the same specs, whether Sako or VKT. People really seem to gravitate toward and demand Sako's more in general for some reason, and that can drive the price difference. And then there are the SkY contract Sako's...and the late date, and the...well, just check out the link!


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Would think the average 91/30 or M39 would be fine for hunting at close ranges. But the only real way to see how you are going to get a long with any rifles is to shoot it in the conditions you plan on using it. I know people who can really shoot well off of sandbags on a bench with a nice roof over their heads. They talk about accuracy. But if your actually going to use the rifle in the field you will have to {as you mentioned} try it out with different ammo and then apply it to your skills as a hunter/shooter. Very few people on the internet want to tackle the concept of what constitutes accuracy. To have an accurate rifle and have no marksmanship skills won't help the novice shooter who never had training or practice shooting anywhere than off a bench. Again either should do you well for close range hunting purposes. I love hearing folks using these for hunting. Fun to collect, fun to shoot and fun to get game with a clunker like the MN rifle. Like farming with equipment from the 1950s, takes a little longer and break downs more often but in a twisted kind of way, cool. Regards, John.
Yes, very valid points.
When my son and I are hunting, we like to hike in to a "good spot" we've previously scouted, then sit and wait.
But the game animals don't very often cooperate with the way we plan things. Sometimes you'll encounter your game animal on the trail on the way in or out.
Then you have to be able to drop to a knee, or lean against a nearby tree to steady-up to make a good shot.
So my son practices shooting from a kneeling position. My knees aren't so great, so I try to use a tree, boulder, fence post, or forget it.
The three shots on the lower left my son took with his '44 ex-PU from a kneeling position at fifty yards (iron sights).
 

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The old reliable 91/30 well shoot minute of paper plate any day of the week. It will put venison in tbe pot. If you practice shooting under hunting conditions the old reliable will do every thing you require of it. The problem is that once these Russian beauties get their hooks in you you are done.
 

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Chcusnr,

Just asking here, but are you saying there is no way to tune a 91/30 to equal an M39 in accuracy? For arguments sake, lets limit the distance to 100-150yds.
Too many variables to make a blanket statement, but the "tuning" has already been done on the M-39, so you would be starting out behind the game.

That said, I am no expert and all of my rifles are capable of better shooting than I am.
 

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I suppose considering I could afford the M39 (Albeit a few hundred more than the 91/30)
A quality M39 should not be a few hundred more, in my opinion. If a nice refurb M91/30 goes for approximately $250, you should be able to find a quality M39 in the ballpark of $450. Both types of rifle can do the job. A M91/30 would be lighter if you do a lot of walking. FWIW, I happen to deer hunt with a Century made M91/30 sniper, based off of a Finn marked 1937 Tula.

 
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