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I'm here... and would have said almost exactly what TP has already said. Mid-19th century Germany or central europe. I confess I've never liked these overly ornate, heavy-featured target rifles so what I know about them is just what I've picked up in passing. The rear sight is a type common on Swiss rifles, but that means almost nothing. It could have been copied almost anywhere.

I should add... its a reasonably high quality combination hunting/target rifle. The adjustable tang sight was for target work and you are lucky to have it. The sight on the barrel was for hunting. One of the mistakes we moderns often make is to confuse quality with decoration. In the mid-19th century the services of very good engravers was relatively cheap. The stepped lockplate and "bun nut" retaining the hammer speaks more to the quality of the rifle than the engraving does... though NONE of these rifles were inexpensive in the sense that "farmer quality" American rifles were at the same time. The fact that it is not signed at all suggests to me it is the product of one of the major arms making centers and that it was intended to be sold elsewhere, perhaps made in Suhl and intended for sale in Bohemia (this is just a guess!) where a local dealer or "maker" would put his name on it. This didn't always happen, so there are unmarked rifles about. Much of Eastern and central Europe had wealthy land-owning gentry but very little industrial capacity in the mid-19th century.
 

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I totally agree that it looks VERY Germanic. However as the OP has not found any proof marks on that I would have expected to have found under the Prussian and AH rules, it is not possible, so far, to determine its originating country.

tac
At least according to Greener, proof wasn't compulsory in Germany until 1892 and was still optional in Austria-Hungary at that date. This rifle clearly predates 1892. Interestingly (and confirming what Greener says about the subject) the 1885 edition of Greener makes no mention at all of German or Austrian proof... Of course, this rifle also predates the unification of Germany. If any of the independent German states had a compulsory proof law, I've yet to hear of it.
Again (in the spirit of conjecture, for that is all that is possible in a situation like this) it may be that, if made for the wholesale market, neither the maker or the reseller wanted it proved as, if it was going to a different country, this would just advertise that it was not the product of whoever was selling it. Proof marks are very useful when present, but their absence often does not tell us much. For instance, in the early 19th century Anglo-American gun trade British proofs were commonplace but as time went on, say by the middle of the century, they tended to be stamped on the bottom of the barrel rather than being visible. I suspect this was because the re-sellers did not want to advertise where the parts were made though I think that very few buyers understood the proofs at all. I have a really splendid tapered octagonal barrel engraved "Lane & Reed Boston" on the top flat with B'ham proofs underneath. It dates from about 1850. I've also had dozens of Lane & Reed militia muskets, all British made, dating from before 1832 and most of those had the B'ham proofs clearly visible.
 
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