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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently picked up an un-rebuilt 1937 Tula Nagant from a gun shop in York PA. It does not have the rectangle with the line through it and has dark wood grips. It is a Century Arms import and came with a post war holster and cleaning rod. I was just wondering what the rarity and value are for this particular piece. Any input would be appreciated.Thanks.
 

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Can't say for sure, without seeing it. However, just being a Century import it is very likely that your revolver IS a rebuilt & refinished example. Plenty of them went through the postwar rebuild without getting the mark. Even if it is original matching and a high percentage of original blue, it's value is greatly deminished with the import mark. All orginal Nagants with the highest values are the Czarist era ones (generally pre 1918) and to a lesser extent the WWII dated ones. In between. values are lower. If it is, in fact a post war rebuilt/refinished (one, the other, or both) it's value just isn't going to be any different than current wholesale, or maybe half again that for someone who isn't licensed.
 

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Can you post pictures? Please try to show the area on the right side of the frame and the face of the cylinder. That should help show if it has been rebuilt.
Joe
 

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The pics aren't enough to tell much. However, I can seen that the grips are probably original (or replaced with correct ones!). They aren't refurb material.
Does the number on the face of the cylinder match the number match the number on the frame of the gun? Does it have stamps on the ones that don't have numbers like the one here?
View attachment 141726

The AC mark on the frame should could like one of these and there should be no other marks in this area.
View attachment 141727 View attachment 141728

Does the number on the inside of the side plate match the number on the frame?

BTW try again on the pictures. Do it outside if you can so you get lots of light. If there is a zoom feature on your camera, get further back then use the zoom. If there is a macro feature use that as well. From what I can see so far, it doesn't look to be refurbed.
Joe
 

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Mkid, we're glad you are trying & hope you keep it up 'til you can make a really good presentation. The photography thing is not easy to master, but, as you can see from jleiper's posts, the results are well worth it. At the very least, your revolver is cool just because of the grips!
Here is an article by our friend, Ted, with some basic photog tips.
http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinPhoto.htm
You might also do a google search to find information about using your particular camera.
Now, if you'll excuse me, I have a brand new Nikon D60 and I have no clue how to operate the dang thang! Several hundred guns are screaming to be shared with all you guys. This is one of those times I wish my internet would go down, so I'd get off my butt & go do something constructive! Milsurpkid, I'll race you to better our photog skills?! :)
 

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you bring up a point I've been meaning to ask about imports/refurb's...

How likely is it that a new collector is going to be able to find decent and/or sought after guns through importers? Would we be better off focusing on private collections?

I don't seem to be able to stumble on these kinds of deals...and most of the estate or private sales I've seen seem to have the run of the mill collections or are priced way out of my league...what's the trick too finding these deals (I know, I know...just got done reading the , "...never tell your friend before you close the deal...thread.
 

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you bring up a point I've been meaning to ask about imports/refurb's...

How likely is it that a new collector is going to be able to find decent and/or sought after guns through importers? Would we be better off focusing on private collections?

I don't seem to be able to stumble on these kinds of deals...and most of the estate or private sales I've seen seem to have the run of the mill collections or are priced way out of my league...what's the trick too finding these deals (I know, I know...just got done reading the , "...never tell your friend before you close the deal...thread.
Your chances of finding rare guns at the importers are directly proportional to number of people you know who work for the importer and owe you favors. The problem of finding good refurb guns is that even a 1942 dated Tula is likely pretty trashed by the refurb.

The real trick is that you have to be patient and you have to expect to spend twice what you would for refurbs. I know it sounds expensive, but it just means only buying half as many good guns as you would have bought refurb guns. Unless it's a rare date, try to get original guns. Take original guns with mismatched cylinders if you have too. Remember that the cylinders on the refurbs are almost 100% forced matched anyway. In fact, when I hear that a refurb is all matched, I kind of chuckle. New grips, new barrel, new front sight, new cylinder, belt sanded, but all matching!

Recently I managed to get a 1928 dated gun with an armorers replacement cylinder at a recent show for $200. No import marks, just an SA! I also found a matched non-import 1945 Tula for a bit over $200. The other guys who wanted it wouldn't pay more than they would for a refurb, so now its mine. There are an amazing number of variations in the 1942-45 period!

Good hunting!
Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I finally got around to taking the side plate off. It does match the number on the frame and cylinder. Also, the only other marking besides the one JLIEPER pictured on the right side of the frame is an upside down 2 just above the other marking. Also the cylinder does match the frame and has stamps where there are no numbers.
 

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I finally got around to taking the side plate off. It does match the number on the frame and cylinder. Also, the only other marking besides the one JLIEPER pictured on the right side of the frame is an upside down 2 just above the other marking. Also the cylinder does match the frame and has stamps where there are no numbers.
Sounds like you got a pretty original piece. I would love to see a picture of the mark you describe as an upside down 2. BTW which mark was it, the one I pictured on the right or the left?
Thanks,
Joe
 

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Recently I managed to get a 1928 dated gun with an armorers replacement cylinder at a recent show for $200. No import marks, just an SA! I also found a matched non-import 1945 Tula for a bit over $200. The other guys who wanted it wouldn't pay more than they would for a refurb, so now its mine. There are an amazing number of variations in the 1942-45 period!

Wish I was that lucky, sounds like a couple of good deals.
 

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Thanks, Joe...

Your chances of finding rare guns at the importers are directly proportional to number of people you know who work for the importer and owe you favors. The problem of finding good refurb guns is that even a 1942 dated Tula is likely pretty trashed by the refurb.

The real trick is that you have to be patient and you have to expect to spend twice what you would for refurbs. I know it sounds expensive, but it just means only buying half as many good guns as you would have bought refurb guns. Unless it's a rare date, try to get original guns. Take original guns with mismatched cylinders if you have too. Remember that the cylinders on the refurbs are almost 100% forced matched anyway. In fact, when I hear that a refurb is all matched, I kind of chuckle. New grips, new barrel, new front sight, new cylinder, belt sanded, but all matching!

Recently I managed to get a 1928 dated gun with an armorers replacement cylinder at a recent show for $200. No import marks, just an SA! I also found a matched non-import 1945 Tula for a bit over $200. The other guys who wanted it wouldn't pay more than they would for a refurb, so now its mine. There are an amazing number of variations in the 1942-45 period!

Good hunting!
Joe
 
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